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I'm wondering about quite an unusual resolution of March and Support orders. Let's say I have one footman on land A and one knight and one footman on land B. I assign a support order to the footman on land A and a march order on the knight and footman on land B. I decide to split my forces, and I order the footman from B to move to A (so I got two footmen on A now), and the knight from B to move to some land C that lies next to both A and B. There are enemy forces on C, so a battle ensues. My question is: can the footman I moved to A (on which there is a support order) still support the battle on C even though it came from the march order that started this attack? The total strength of my force will be:

  • one supporting footman from A + knight from B = 3 or
  • two supporting footmen from A + knight from B = 4?
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Option two would happen here, two supporting footmen from A + knight from B = 4.

From the rulebook:

Before resolving combat, all other non-combat movement from the area assign the March Order must be completed. - Rulebook pg 15

This means that the footman unit that is moving has to have completed it's march before combat is initiated. Then:

Supporting Combat Strength means the combined Combat Strength of all units in the supporting area. - Rulebook pg 17

From this, you cannot count certain units strength to add to combat, it must be all the units in the supporting area.

The order of marching/combat/supporting makes your second option the case.

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