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There are many spells in Yu-Gi-Oh that summon monsters. Some of the more common varieties are Fusion and Ritual summoning. These mechanics involve using a spell that, upon it's resolution, summons a monster.

My question is, am I allowed to chain a trap like Bottomless Trap Hole to a Fusion or Ritual summon (or any other spell that summons a monster on resolution?) I know you can use cards that specifically negate spells and traps that summon monsters like Solemn Warning, but am I able to use a card like Solemn Strike to negate the Fusion or Ritual summon, even though it only happens on resolution?

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Leaving an answer here because the answer by spaff is incorrect. Things actually get a bit more complicated

First of all, this has very little to do with spell speeds, as a summon itself does not have a spell speed. The spell used for summoning the monster does, and there's no problem negating this with a card like 'Magic Jammer' or 'Solemn Warning'.

Once the monster is summoned successfully, a window opens in which you can react to the summon with cards like 'Bottomless Trap Hole' or 'Torrential Tribute'. Note that this is not the same as chaining. These cards will start a new chain at that point.

Lastly, we have cards that negate a summon (e.g. 'Solemn Strike' or 'Black Horn of Heaven'). These cards cannot be use against other effects that would summon a monster (except if they specifically mention being able to negate that effect itself, such as 'Solemn Warning', which can do both)

So the kind of summon these cards can negate are called (in the case of a special summon, I'm ignoring normal or tribute summons here) inherent special summons. These are summons that do not form a chain when performed.

This includes Synchro, Xyz, Pendulum, and Link summons. They also include contact fusions (e.g. Gladiator Beast fusions) and monsters like 'Cyber Dragon' or 'Black Luster Soldier - Envoy of the Beginning'

  • Thanks for this! I wasn't quite sure of the truth, there was some dissent regarding the answer. This is closer to how I thought it was supposed to work. – OutOfCharacters Jul 24 '18 at 15:09
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In short, yes.

A trap like BTH is of speed 2, and a counter-trap like Solemn Strike is of speed 3. Both of these can be chained to the summoning of a monster. Quick play spells only reach a speed of 2, so regardless of the spell/monster effect used to achieve these Fusion/Ritual summons, both regular, continuous, and counter trap cards can be legally used in response.

As for your question on resolution, it wouldn't matter. Solemn strike negates the summon, so essentially, the card used to summon resolves, and then Solemn Strike prevents the monster from ever actually hitting the field. This is an attractive effect to a lot of players against certain decks because this prevents effects that happen when monsters are summoned, since the spell spell resolves, but the summoning does not.

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    Here's a followup question. What about quickplay spells/traps/quick effects that need a target, like Compulsory Evacuation Device? You would be unable to chain these to the Fusion/Ritual spell activation, since the monster isn't on the field to target when the Compulse is chained, correct? – OutOfCharacters Jul 10 '18 at 17:14
  • In this specific question about spells that summon monsters (e.g. ritual and fusion) solemn strike cannot be used – WhatsThePoint Jul 11 '18 at 7:45
  • Could you post a source on that? I don't want to get the ruling wrong in the future. – OutOfCharacters Jul 11 '18 at 15:13
  • @OutOfCharacters Correct, since it would be in a chain, you would have to wait until the card hits the field. However, a monster hitting the field does NOT start a chain, so your trap will be link 1. Here is a link for more useful information on what you're looking for. yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Summons_%26_Chains – spaff Jul 12 '18 at 12:59

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