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player A makes LACE as a horizontal line play. player B adds Y to make LACEY then puts E A vertically to make YEA down in the same play I claimed that was not legal as it is two turns in one. The other 3 players all disagreed and allowed the play

  • The answer below covers why this is a legal play. As a suggestion be on the look out for pluralising words. Sticking an 'S' on the end of a word whilst creating a new one going other direction is a good thing to look out for. – StartPlayer Jul 13 '18 at 8:44
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From the official rules on the Hasbro website:

3: [...] All letters played on a turn must be placed in one row across or down the board, to form at least one complete word. If, at the same time, they touch others letters in adjacent rows, those must also form complete words, crossword fashion, with all such letters. The player gets full credit for all words formed or modified on his or her turn.

4: New words may be formed by:

  • Adding one or more letters to a word or letters already on the board.

  • Placing a word at right angles to a word already on the board. The new word must use one of the letters already on the board or must add a letter to it. (See Turns 2, 3 and 4 below.)

  • Placing a complete word parallel to a word already played so that adjacent letters also form complete words. (See Turn 5 in the Scoring Examples section below.)

So player B was following the rules by playing the word YEA in a single row, and at the same time it adds the Y to the LACE already on the board, as per the second dot point above.

Player B will score points for both LACEY and YEA in this case.

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    Note than when scoring points for LACEY, any modifiers under the L, A, C, or E are not applied, as they are only applied once. – mmathis Jul 13 '18 at 13:24
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    Or more accurately, the bonuses only apply the turn you put the tile on top of them. If you played the Y on a double-letter, for example, it would be worth double points in both LACEY and YEA. – ConMan Jul 16 '18 at 0:09

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