8

Does Wizards make this information available? This would open some some really cool machine learning problem such as:

  • to try and predict which decks do better against which decks
  • automatic deck classification into archetypes

For example, for Pro Tour Ravnica, I've found the full match lists at: https://magic.wizards.com/en/events/coverage/ptgrn/tournament-results but I'd need to scrape it from the web.

The decks however, I can only see:

For Magic Online, it would be even more awesome if we could have full play by play data of tournaments: Is there a standard file format for Magic the Gathering games? to decide e.g. how much a turn one Black Lotus increases your win rate. Of course, this gets close to privacy problems, so likely not possible.

https://www.mtggoldfish.com/articles/wizards-data-insanity from 2017 mentions that Wizards has controlled this kind of data more and more so I'm not very hopeful.

3

I went and checked all the published data on wizards website and confirmed what you saw with your example and the following is all that is published.

now this doesn't prevent you from ocring the frame by frame of the live matches to get all played cards [ with something like Googles vision api ] and then making your data set for which cards played in a match most often caused the deck to win. Unfortunately this is the only current way , I could find, to get win data for all decks in the tournament outside of the top 8

In response to your second question there is no established format by wizards for this information as they don't publish a public api for there data.

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-1

Wizards of the Coast does not make this data available to the public.

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  • 1
    This is true as far as I know, but your answer would be better with sources. I know they have posted publicly about why they don't publish MTGO results anymore, but I'm not sure about Pro Tour matches. – VolleyJosh Jan 24 '19 at 23:17
  • The brevity of this answer may make it better suited as a comment. – Neil Meyer Jun 5 '19 at 10:27
  • @NeilMeyer The brevity of your comment may make it not useful. – xordon Jun 6 '19 at 20:57
  • This is the correct and only answer to the question asked. Regarding "citation needed", it is not reasonable to ask for proof of the nonexistence of something. The converse is easily proved and has yet to be shown to be true. Simple logic says that since there is no evidence that there is a public source of data, therefore, it is reasonable to believe there isn't. – xordon Jun 6 '19 at 21:06

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