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The other day we were playing the card game "Tute" using Spanish "naipes" and we were told there were some card combinations that score bonus points: gaining a King and a Knight, things like that.

Is there a list of all card combinations that score bonus points?

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In Tute, "las 20" or "las 40" can be called when you have 11 & 12 (caballo & rey) of the same suit, STILL IN YOUR hand after you took one trick. 40 is if you have the pair matching the current trump, 20 is for the other suits. Each 20 points are signalled by putting one card (two cards for las 40) upside down on your pile of collected cards perpendicular to the rest of the cards. If you want to call more than one set (e.g. you have more than one pairs of 11 & 12 matching the same suit) you need to take al least one trick for each call. Other players may ask the caller to show their matching cards, but it's considered bad etiquette since everyone should be paying attention and know if one of the cards has already been played.

These points are added to the rest of your hand at the end of the round. Other cards are worth:

  • Aces: 11 points
  • Threes: 10 points
  • Reyes (12s): 4 points
  • Caballos (11s): 3 points
  • Sotas (10s): 2 points

All other cards have no value.

In Tute Cabrero, the person taking the last trick takes 10 extra points (las 10 de última). Also, if someone manages to take all tricks in a round, it's considered they did Capote and automatically win the game, regardless of current score UNLESS they had also claimed "20" or "40" on that round, in which case they lose.

You can read more details in https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tute and https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tute_cabrero.

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  • This is a comment added by MarcoCiafa (he does not have enough reputation yet to post it): I was thought there is another situation called "Tute Cabrero" which is getting all 11's OR 12's and win a trick (while having them in your hand). It's very rare to see, especially if they play 4 or more people, but it does make you the winner of the entire game. – mcabreb Jan 7 at 10:41
  • This is a comment added by MarcoCiafa (he does not have enough reputation yet to post it): I would like to add a rule related to the "Capote" (didn't knew it had a name). If someone wins all tricks (at the end, he is the only one with cards), he would make everyone else lose the round UNLESS he had also claimed "20" or "40" on that round, in which case he loses. – mcabreb Jan 7 at 10:41
  • @mcabreb I added the clarification. – Fernando Margueirat Feb 18 at 20:25
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I don't know how to make this a comment of Fernando's post, so I'll just write it here.

I was taught there is another situation called "Tute Cabrero" which is getting all 11's OR 12's and win a trick (while having them in your hand). It's very rare to see, especially if they play 4 or more people, but it does make you the winner of the entire game.

I would like to add a rule related to the "Capote" (didn't knew it had a name). If someone wins all tricks (at the end, he is the only one with cards), he would make everyone else lose the round UNLESS he had also claimed "20" or "40" on that round, in which case he loses.

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  • Welcome to the site, and thanks for your contribution. To post a comment instead of an answer, you'll have to earn 50 reputation first through well-received question and answer posts. (This post may end up being deleted since it isn't really an answer to the original question.) – Benjamin Cosman Jan 6 at 22:19
  • Should I suggest an edit on Fernando's answer? Could someone copy my answer into a comment on Fernando's answer? I could write a complete answer in order to keep these extra rules, but it seems ridiculous that I write the same Fernando wrote with a few more lines... I don't know how to proced. It would be a shame that this new information gets lost and the game rules still being incomplete. – MarcoCiafa Jan 6 at 22:27
  • Thanks for your comment! I have added your answer as a comment below Fernando's answer so it does not get lost if your answer is deleted. – mcabreb Jan 7 at 10:41

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