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In Cribbage, what is the scoring rule in this example?

  • Player 1 plays a 4.
  • Player 2 plays a 3.
  • Player 3 plays a 5. (claims 3 points for 4,3,5 run)
  • Player 4 plays a 6. (now 4 more points for 4,3,5,6 run)
  • Player 1 plays a second 4 (here the debate)

He claims that he should get another 4 points (for 3,5,6,4) indicating by pointing at each card in reverse of the sequence of play (counterclockwise) 6,3,5,4 ending with his second 4).

I claim that he can't count the second run of four cards because they were not in the sequence of play (clockwise).

Who is right?

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    I don't understand what you're asking here; why is "3564" problematic, but "435" and "4356" are acceptable? None of those are in order, so I don't see how "the sequence of play" comes into question. – goldPseudo May 5 '19 at 13:58
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From the American Cribbage Congress Rules of Cribbage:

straight (or run), single: Sequence of three or more consecutive cards in any order during the play of the cards; for example, 3-5-6-7-4 (counts three when the 7 is played and counts five when the 4 is played)

When the second 4 is played by Player 1 the last 4 cards played are:

3, 5, 6, 4

This set of 4 consecutive cards clearly meets the definition above of:

... Sequence of three or more consecutive cards in any order during the play of the cards ....

Player 1 is entitled to score 4 for this run.

In regards to your claim above that:

... he can't count the second run of four cards because they were not in the sequence of play (clockwise).

Nowhere in the Rules is there a necessity to identify the qualifying cards for a score in a specified order. Your claim otherwise is entirely bogus.

The sequence counts solely by virtue of the required cards, having been played, meeting the criterion of being "Sequence of three or more consecutive cards in any order". Any such identification of qualifying cards is purely informative, and instructive, to assist beginners in learning the game.

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