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With the reprint of LeyLine of Anticipation in Core Set 2020, the interaction with Teferi, Time Raveler came to mind and I couldn't figure out what is right.

If I have the Leyline and my opponent has Teferi, may I cast spells during my opponent's turn?

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    @Glorfindel, why people change link from scryfall to gatherer? The links of gatherer always send to a page with "Your search returned zero results; click here if you would like to refine it. Please check your search terms and try again." – David Alves Jun 19 at 16:42
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    Those are the official Magic the Gathering links... For some cards the autolink doesn't work (e.g. if there's an apostrophe in the name), but here they do. – Glorfindel Jun 19 at 16:45
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Leyline of Anticipation won't help you; you will only be able to cast spells on your turn, in your main phases, when the stack is empty.

307.5. If a spell, ability, or effect states that a player can do something only “any time they could cast a sorcery,” it means only that the player must have priority, it must be during the main phase of their turn, and the stack must be empty. The player doesn’t need to have a sorcery they could cast. Effects that would preclude that player from casting a spell or casting a sorcery don’t affect the player’s capability to perform that action (unless the action is actually casting a spell or casting a sorcery).

So "any time they could cast a sorcery" does not mean literally "is it possible to cast a sorcery under the current game conditions". Instead, it means "could they cast a sorcery under the default rules of the game".

Being able to cast spells as though they had flash doesn't help here, because flash simply means "You may play this card any time you could cast an instant." Due to Teferi's ability, your opponent's turn is not a time that you could cast an instant.

Unlike the rule that defines "any time you could cast a sorcery", there is no similar rule for flash that defines "any time you could cast an instant" as "any time you have priority". So instead, "any time you could cast an instant" is interpreted in the more literal sense; being determined by whether or not the current game state would allow you to cast an instant.

This is confirmed by a ruling on Teferi, Time Raveler:

If an effect allows opponents to cast spells any time they could cast an instant (for example, if your opponent also controls a Teferi, Time Raveler and activates his +1 loyalty ability), the restriction of Teferi’s first ability takes precedence over that permission.

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    Maybe I'm missing something, but how does this answer the question? You only give the definition of "any time they could cast a sorcery” but even knowing this definition I would say that the question still holds. one card says you can only cast during your main phase, when stack is empty and you have priority and the other card says you can cast whenever you can cast an instant. Why would one effect win over the other? – Ivo Beckers Jun 20 at 14:29
  • @IvoBeckers Interesting point... I was thinking about it only from the point of view of "if I can cast something as though it had flash, then does my opponent's turn count as a time that I could cast a sorcery?" Looking to see if there's another rule other than 101.2 I can add. – GendoIkari Jun 20 at 14:34
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    @IvoBeckers I think it's just in the definition of Flash: "You may play this card any time you could cast an instant." Due to Teferi's ability, your opponent's turn is not a time that you could cast an instant. – GendoIkari Jun 20 at 14:38
  • i think you're right :) – Ivo Beckers Jun 21 at 8:20
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No, you can't. In general in Magic, 'can't' beats 'can', and this is no exception. It's explicitly mentioned in the Rulings below the card in Gatherer:

If an effect allows opponents to cast spells any time they could cast an instant (for example, if your opponent also controls a Teferi, Time Raveler and activates his +1 loyalty ability), the restriction of Teferi’s first ability takes precedence over that permission.

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    I think the crux of the issue here isn't that "can't trumps can", but that the Leyline allows sorceries to be played at instant speed, and thus being restricted by an opponent's Teferi doesn't seem like a restriction. I remember questions about this going all the way back to equipments versus Vedalken Orrery. – Arthur Jun 19 at 14:58
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    Why does the layer/timestamp system not apply? – Acccumulation Jun 19 at 22:16
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    @Acccumulation “101.2. When a rule or effect allows or directs something to happen, and another effect states that it can’t happen, the “can’t” effect takes precedence.” That rule applies everywhere, including the interaction of continuous effects. – GendoIkari Jun 20 at 5:51
  • @GendoIkari but "can't" isn't actually mentioned here. – Ivo Beckers Jun 20 at 14:32
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    Now I'm curious why the templating uses "any time you could cast a sorcery", when it could just as easily use "any time you could play a land" or "any time you could cast a creature" or "any time you could cast an artifact" instead. – GendoIkari Jun 20 at 20:07
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Teferi wins, but IMHO, for a different reason. Leyline of Anticipation is giving all of your spells the Flash static ability.

702.8a Flash is a static ability that functions in any zone from which you could play the card it's on. “Flash” means “You may play this card any time you could cast an instant."

Look at Slimebind, or any other card with Flash. If your opponent has Teferi, you can still only cast Slimebind when you can cast a Sorcery. With Leyline, think of it as every spell you have in the game now has the word "Flash" written on it. Teferi isn't nullifying the word "Flash" on your spells. He is affecting when your spells can be cast.

  • I think the recent add-on to my answer is addressing this same point; at least if I'm reading it correctly. Teferi is changing the meaning of "when you can cast an instant". – GendoIkari Jun 20 at 20:05

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