8

My opponent played Pacifism on a creature on my side of the battlefield. Later, I wanted to exile the enchantment with Conclave Tribunal.

My opponent had the opinion that I was now the controller of Pacifism, so I couldn't exile this enchantment with Conclave Tribunal.

I assumed that I could because I thought he was the controller of Pacifism. Who is right here?

12

The controller of an aura is the player who cast it, not (necessarily) the controller of the permanent it enchants. A subsequent control changing effect, like Donate, can change this, but they're relatively rare.

So you're right, you can target Pacifism with Conclave Tribunal and exile it.

1

As Glorfindel pointed out, although pacifism is enchanted on a creature you control, your opponent controls it, and you can target it with Conclave Tribunal. If we look at another example, it becomes much more obvious how this interaction works.

Take mind control. It has two instructions:

  1. Enchant Creature, same as pacifism.

  2. You control enchanted creature.

Here, 'you' refers to the controller of the mind control. It would make very little sense if you controlled the enchantment when your creature was enchanted, since that would cause Mind Control to be almost useless. Instead, the controller of the mind control controls the creature. Similarly, if you were to give control of a mind control you control to another player, such as with Donate, they would also gain control of the creature it targets.

Apologies for using the word 'control' so many times.

  • 3
    All correct, but a card can be owned by one player and controlled by another; who controls a card can be changed by cards like Mind Control, the "owner" cannot be changed by any card or effect (at least since ANTE went away). So "your opponent owns it" in the first sentence is correct, but "your opponent both owns and controls it" would make more sense in this context. – BradC Aug 15 at 15:53
  • Thanks for the catch. I originally wrote 'owns' all over the place and realized that that's misleading in the context. – Aetherfox Aug 15 at 15:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.