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Me and my dad keep arguing where the Rooks and Bishops go.

What goes in the corners, the rooks or the bishops?

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    This question shouldn't be that hard to find through a simple search on the internet, check out en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rules_of_chess – Ola Ström Jan 1 at 14:11
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    In the future consider looking it up beforehand? If you can't find it then, we will be happy to help! But this question shouldn't be that difficult to find online. Out of curiosity, was your dad wrong or right? – CollinB Jan 1 at 16:20
  • It can be an interesting house rule to play with where you can alter the order of pieces on your back row during game setup. In Janggi this is explicitly allowed in the rules that knights and elephants may be transposed. This would, as alluded to elsewhere, otherwise just be a house rule and against the official rules for western chess. – JMoravitz Jan 2 at 20:32
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    This is a fine question (because it can form an on-site point of reference), but it would have been much, much better if you had looked into this and done more research first. Then you could have answered it yourself. – Pureferret Jan 3 at 12:02
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White square to the corner right, Queen on her colour, rooks in the corners, bishops beside the royalty.

You can remember this by recalling that bishops are equivalent to barons in the peerage, so "next to royalty" in importance, and superior to mere knights.

enter image description here

As the game migrated through Persia (or Iran if you prefer) the pieces now known as bishops were known as viziers - cabinet ministers if you will. Rooks were originally elephants and only became castles when the game arrived in Europe.

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You start with arranging the chess board right first. Coz that's very easy to confuse considering chess board is a square.

While the arrangement shared above is correct. One thing to note is place chess board in such a way that light square is always on the right hand bottom corner of each player.

Learn more about chess setup here.

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