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I am in dire need of assistance. My wife and son were engaged in a heated two player game of Candy Land, when suddenly tragedy struck. My son landed on a licorice space and per the rules of the game he loses his next turn. Then the unthinkable had occurred. My wife had also landed on a licorice space causing her to lose her next turn.

My sons next turn is now skipped but my wife is equally unable to take a turn, unable to draw a card initiating the next turn.

My wife and son now unable to continue the game are beginning to dematerialize from the mortal realm as they are beginning the gradual phase shift into eternal purgatory. After endless searching into the deepest arcana of the occult (the rules on the back of the box), I have yet to find an official transcription that can restore my wife and son back to our plane of existence so that they can end this Jumanji style nightmare and we can pick up the pieces of our lives and what is left.

Please help us resolve this ambiguity in the rules.

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  • 12
    If you're not in eternal purgatory, you're not playing Candyland.
    – Sneftel
    Dec 31 '20 at 15:00
  • 5
    This isn't Jumanji, there's no "In the jungle you must wait until the dice read 5 or 8" here - they each skip 1 turn, effectively your wife's skipped turn offset's your son's skipped turn and they continue in normal turn order equivalent to neither skipping any turns.
    – Andrew
    Dec 31 '20 at 19:34
  • 1
    Your family is trapped in the Hell of Never Ending Board Games between Monopoly With House Rules and Uno.
    – Schwern
    Dec 31 '20 at 21:32
  • 3
    @Schwern There are multiple levels of Board Game Hell. The final level is just a bunch of people that are constantly telling you about all of their Monopoly house rules and why they make the game better. Dec 31 '20 at 23:36
  • But this is how I feel with ALL board games
    – Strawberry
    Jan 3 at 0:33
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In games in general, if all players skip a turn, that is the equivalent as doing nothing. You fast forward through all skipped turns, and the game picks up as if none of those players had skipped a turn. The reason for this is that the turn still happens in a metaphysical sense, but ends as soon as it begins.

In this case, it goes like this:

  1. Your wife ends her turn. Turns remaining to be skipped: son 1, wife 1.
  2. It is your son's turn: that turn is skipped. Turns remaining to be skipped: son 0, wife 1.
  3. It is your wife's turn: that turn is skipped. Turns remaining to be skipped: son 0, wife 0.
  4. It is your son's turn.

Note that in games where players can miss multiple turns consecutively (this is likely not relevant to Candyland), you can only shortcut through the least number of pending skipped turns by any player. So if you have two players in a game, and player A would skip 3 turns and player B would skip 2 turns, this is the same as Player A skipping 1 turn.

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  • 4
    In practice it's even simpler than that. Each person only needs to remember their personal "turns to skip". Son lands on licorice, has to remember to skip next turn. Wife completes a turn. Son says "my turn? This is the one I skip". Wife completes a turn, Son, after having skipped one, now takes a normal turn. Dec 31 '20 at 19:12

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