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For instance, Player 1 has Dragonmaster Outcast on their battlefield, which has the ability: At the beginning of your upkeep, if you control six or more lands, create a 5/5 red Dragon creature token with flying. If Player 1 fails to create the token creature during their turn, can they create it during the Player 2's turn (and block an attacker with it), or create two token creatures on their next turn? I love playing this game, but the fights my 11-year-old son and I get into sometimes are nuts!

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    We could use some more information about this situation. In this case is it your son that is forgetting to create the token? Are you doing anything to help him remember and improve his game play? As was mentioned in an answer as this is a family game you can do a lot of things to fix the problem. – Joe W Jun 3 at 2:31
  • Yes, it is my son. He has spent a LOT of money on powerful cards and has a dragon deck that I've been trying to beat with cards that I had or that cost less than $3. So, no; he's KILLING me 80% of the time in very short games--I don't think he needs my help. We wondered what the rules were, but ultimately I would like to teach him to give opponents a chance to play instead of wiping them off the board in as few turns as possible ! XD (Squinty-eye open-mouth laughing face) – Maple Owl Jun 3 at 2:36
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    Well if he is forgetting to do required steps at times it sure sounds like he does. Sure it won't matter in a casual game but repeated mistakes like that in a tournament game could end up giving him a loss. Also not sure why you think he needs to give opponents a "chance" when you are playing with a deck that lacks power. – Joe W Jun 3 at 12:31
  • Yes DenisS, it does! Thanks! – Maple Owl Jun 4 at 1:33
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In a competitive situation, this is a "missed trigger"; as soon as you realise it has happened, you should call for a judge who will resolve the situation - what they will do well depend on the level of play: the resolution in low-level play (e.g. FNM at your local store) will likely be different from that at a Pro Tour, where both players could be subject to penalties.

In a casual game among your own family, do whatever gives you the most fun.

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    Or, depending on the son's age, whatever gives the son the most fun. In this case, having spent "a lot of money" on a dragon deck, he might be old enough for some harshness, but you never know. – Arthur Jun 3 at 5:47
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    @Arthur "you" is meant to be interpreted as plural in that sentence! – Philip Kendall Jun 3 at 7:11
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    In competitive REL games both players are expected to keep accurate game states. Letting your opponent miss a trigger for an advantage will get you a pretty serious sanction and also make you loose all the respect anyone may have for you. – Neil Meyer Jun 3 at 19:27
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    Also the implications of a may trigger is I think also relevant here. – Neil Meyer Jun 3 at 19:30
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    @NeilMeyer 1) we're not really talking about competitive REL here, we're talking about a kitchen table game 2) there is no "may" trigger here, the Dragonmaster Outcast trigger is mandatory. – Philip Kendall Jun 3 at 20:10

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