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This description of the card game Boston has this list of the bids: enter image description here What does the "Point Value of Bid" column indicate? There is another table later that shows how many chips the bidder gets if they fulfill the bid, so that can't be it.

Also, why do so many bids have the same point value? Why does it go from 8 to 4 between Nine Levees and Little Misére on the Table, even though the latter is a higher ranked bid?

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  • Looking at the link you gave, its looks like it is redundant, I think that "Chips to each Opponent" table replace it. Another explanation could be that it is a multiplier for number of chips that the winner will get for meeting the bid. P.S: That description page could be written better.
    – Cohensius
    Sep 19 at 8:22
  • the only other mention of "point value" is this: After a pre-determined number of hands (usually set at 12) the player with the highest total point value in chips is declared the winner of the game.
    – Cohensius
    Sep 19 at 8:28
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Boston is a family of several trick-taking games. see [pagat] for details.

Reading the rules of Boston at whiteknucklecards, I think that the "Point value of bid" is the amount in chips that the players pay the soloist if she makes her contract.

Possible bids from lowest to highest tabled alongside their respective value in score: enter image description here

If the Soloist wins he receives the appropriate amount from each opponent; if not, he pays the appropriate to each opponent.

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  • I think this table shows the number of chips the bidder receives from the other players if they make their bid - ibb.co/3C22yvf - is there another explanation for that table? Sep 20 at 6:16
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    @davidvgalbraith, yes. I think the differences in the tables is due to different games/variants in the games-family of Boston
    – Cohensius
    Sep 20 at 8:08

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