Questions tagged [bidding]

Bidding is an auction mechanic common to a variety of board and card games where two or more players or teams compete for a right or privilege. Bidding is common in trick-taking card game such as bridge, and several other bidding examples are provided in the bidding wiki page.

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What is (Larry Cohen's) the “Law of Total Tricks” In Bridge?

Based on my (imperfect) understanding of the "law," it means that my partnership should bid up to the same level as the number of trumps. For instance, with four trumps over my partner's five card ...
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5answers
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Why are beginning to intermediate bridge players told to delay learning how to bid certain types of unusual hands?

When learning modern bidding (Standard American 5 card majors in my case), I noticed that the system's bidding techniques and common conventions described good ways of getting to a reasonable contract ...
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3answers
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What Is a “Reverse” In Bridge?

Partner opened one diamond. I responded 1 NT with the following hand. ♠Txxx ♥Axx ♦Txxx ♣Ax Partner then rebid two spades. I raised to four spades, reading my partner for 17 points or so. We went ...
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6answers
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In Bridge, Do You Count Defensive Points In the Opponents' Suit When Making a Takeout Double?

Left hand opponent opened 1 heart. Partner doubled for takeout. Right hand opponent passed. I "had to" bid 2 clubs with something like (S) xxx (H) xx (D) Jxxx (C) Jxxx. We were doubled for penalties, ...
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6answers
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In bridge, are there some 13 point hands that should not be opened?

Suppose you have: (s) Jx (h)KQxx (d) KJxx (c) Kxx. That's 13 points, by the usual count. But I can think of at least two things wrong with it. First, there are no aces, meaning that the hand has ...
35
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12answers
9k views

Why is the strong 1NT so prevalent in Bridge?

Bridge is widely considered to be the queen of card games on both sides of the Atlantic. However, there's one huge difference between the way that (most) Americans and (most) Britons play. In ...
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6answers
11k views

How should I teach someone new to spades how to bid?

Bidding in spades is one of the hardest mechanics to master. The gameplay comes with experience, but sometimes bidding just goes awry. I know how I bid and that I disagree with the way other people ...
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2answers
923 views

In bridge which bids need alerting?

When playing bridge which bids need to be pointed out/alerted?
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9answers
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How should hands that are EXTREMELY strong in one suit (10+ cards) be bid?

I'm a bit of a bridge noob, but I'm kind of puzzled about this. Say I have a hand that is ridiculously strong in one suit, say at least 10 cards with all 4 honors (I'll use spades for the example suit)...
5
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2answers
276 views

Is it right to refrain from making a takeout double in borderline situations?

In today's bridge column, this example was given: North opened with one diamond. East doubled with (s) Qxx (h)AQxx (d) x (c) ATxxx. This double technically met my 14 point requirement (12 for high ...
5
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3answers
175 views

Flexibility in Opening two in third seat with 8 points and seven card suit?

Is it against the rules to use your judgement as to whether to open two or three with a seven card suit? Instance was third seat opening with a seven card suit, two of the top five, and 8 points with ...
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2answers
225 views

Do “flat” hands devalue a 4-4 trump fit?

The advantage of a 4-4 trump fit is that you can ruff in either hand, and use the other one as the master hand. But if one or both partners have little ruffing value, then might that advantage be ...
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2answers
558 views

How does one evaluate a hand responding to a “strong” two clubs?

When opener bids a "strong" two club, responder bids two diamonds (waiting), and the opener rebids his suit, e.g. two spades, the responder is now the "captain" of the partnership. That's because s/he ...
2
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3answers
490 views

In bridge, do people go through cycles of under- and -over bidding?

In the board game Go, there are two basic styles, high and low. "High" is all the rage for about ten years, until people have forgotten how to play "low." Then "low" gets "rediscovered," and people ...
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4answers
240 views

Did I “really” have too many points for the following bid?

Not vulnerable versus vulnerable, I was sitting third position with the following hand: (s) KQx (h) --- (d) KJ9xxx (c) K8xx. (All x's are 7 or lower.) I opened 2D, a "weak two" after two passes. One ...
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3answers
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In bridge, how would you bid the “worst” 14 point hand?

You are playing 15-17 point no trumps, five card majors, four card diamond bids, and three card club bids listed on many convention cards. And you have an unusual 14 high card point 4-4-3-2 hand that ...
0
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1answer
143 views

In bridge, does it make sense to “shade” one's bidding standards with a part score?

For instance, most players today bid five card majors, because that's (probably) the best way to get to a major suit game of ten tricks. But suppose my team has a part score of 40. That means that ...