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Questions tagged [bridge]

A 4 player trick-taking card game where opposing partners try to either take the number of tricks they bid or prevent their opponents from doing so. When asking questions on bidding or play, please specify scoring system (Rubber, Matchpoints, IMPS, ec.), Dealer, vulnerability for both sides, full auction to the point of inquiry, and as complete a description of the visible hands as you can, including spot cards instead of x's.

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Is there a good casual online place to practice/learn bridge?

I know that Pogo.com (which powers Yahoo Games) has a long running online bridge game and that there are a handful of places for serious tournament/MasterPoint level bridge players online (though most ...
Shannon John Clark's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
4k views

Why is the King of Spades the best opening lead with this hand?

Well, you pick up this hand: K Q J 10 9 x x x K x x x x The opponents bid 1 NT on your right and 3 NT on your left. What would you lead? Not that difficult, was it? If you line up a million (1.000.000)...
Allure's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
3k views

What is (Larry Cohen's) the "Law of Total Tricks" In Bridge?

Based on my (imperfect) understanding of the "law," it means that my partnership should bid up to the same level as the number of trumps. For instance, with four trumps over my partner's five card ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
5 votes
5 answers
1k views

Do you count defensive points in the opponents' suit when making a takeout double?

Left hand opponent opened 1 heart. Partner doubled for takeout. Right hand opponent passed. I "had to" bid 2 clubs with something like: (S) xxx (H) xx (D) Jxxx (C) Jxxx. We were doubled for ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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18 votes
5 answers
4k views

Why are beginning to intermediate bridge players told to delay learning how to bid certain types of unusual hands?

When learning modern bidding (Standard American 5 card majors in my case), I noticed that the system's bidding techniques and common conventions described good ways of getting to a reasonable contract ...
Joe Golton's user avatar
  • 8,864
13 votes
3 answers
42k views

What is the penalty for failing to follow suit?

Assume the mistake is unintentional, what course of action should be taken when this occurs and is discovered? If the person discovers themselves that they earlier made the mistake, is the penalty ...
Jack's user avatar
  • 189
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is the Purpose of a "Ducking" Play In Bridge?

Sometimes I will have Axx in a key suit, opposite dummy's holdings of Kxxxx. In such situations, I was taught to make a "ducking" play by playing a low card from both sides, instead of playing an A or ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the penalty for the dummy failing to follow suit?

I failed to have the dummy follow suit because the remaining card of that suit was accidentally hidden under a card of another suit. This was discovered later in the game, and treated as a normal ...
anna a's user avatar
  • 101
8 votes
5 answers
12k views

What can the dummy player do in Bridge?

We're learning to play Bridge from Gramma, who played the game a lot ~40 years ago but doesn't really remember the rules (or, at least, the reasons behind some rules and conventions). One of the ...
Mag Roader's user avatar
  • 4,567
8 votes
3 answers
516 views

Can one ask for a "time out" to study the hand in bridge?

"West" (the opening leader) has to lead before seeing the dummy. Both declarer (South) and partner (East) ought to study the dummy before playing. But often they do not. Suppose South wins the trick, ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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7 votes
3 answers
1k views

What Is a "Reverse" In Bridge?

Partner opened one diamond. I responded 1 NT with the following hand. ♠Txxx ♥Axx ♦Txxx ♣Ax Partner then rebid two spades. I raised to four spades, reading my partner for 17 points or so. We went ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
2k views

In Bridge, what is the punishment for misclaiming tricks?

Down to the last two rounds in rubber bridge. Declarer claims remaining tricks only to discover that he has miscounted. He claims the two tricks with Q-10; however, opponent holds the J and ...
Judy's user avatar
  • 71
6 votes
2 answers
4k views

Contract Bridge Games Verses Party Bridge Scoring?

In scoring contract rubber bridge, if you make 2 or more games out of 3 you get 500/700 pts for a rubber. If you make 2 games consecutively before your opponents make a game at all you get 700 pts. ...
Cindy Duncan's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

In bridge, is there a penalty if dummy incorrectly lays down his hand?

In bridge, is there a penalty if dummy lays down his hand and places a spade with the clubs and it is not noticed by the players until the third round is played?
jkm's user avatar
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5 votes
6 answers
4k views

In bridge, are there some 13 point hands that should not be opened?

Suppose you have: (s) Jx (h)KQxx (d) KJxx (c) Kxx. That's 13 points, by the usual count. But I can think of at least two things wrong with it. First, there are no aces, meaning that the hand has ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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3 votes
4 answers
530 views

Why is this club lead suspicious when partner has two small hearts?

Follow-up question to Why is the King of Spades the best opening lead with this hand? In the next example cited by the website, the board and auction is: What would you lead with the North hand? It’s ...
Allure's user avatar
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2 votes
4 answers
533 views

Did I "really" have too many points for the following bid?

Not vulnerable versus vulnerable, I was sitting third position with the following hand: (s) KQx (h) --- (d) KJ9xxx (c) K8xx. (All x's are 7 or lower.) I opened 2D, a "weak two" after two passes. One ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
1 vote
3 answers
433 views

Rubber Bridge scoring

In Rubber Bridge scoring, If the player wins two games with the opponent having an intervening game,does the opponent get 300 for their game?
Ruth Fixsen's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
540 views

What could 1NT mean opposite a partner's takeout double?

Here, for reference, is the entire hand that inspired the question. With only us vulnerable, left hand opponent bid one spade, partner doubled for takeout, right hand opponent passed, and I have (s)...
Tom Au's user avatar
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0 votes
5 answers
229 views

Was an expert right to advocate passing rather than doubling with the hand below?

I'm confused by the advice I've been getting on doubling from the column of a certain expert (Frank Stewart). In another column, he advised doubling South's one heart as West with this 14 point hand, ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
206 views

What are my better options in the situation below?

With both sides vulnerable, South opens one heart when I, West, have the following: Spades 532 Hearts K5 Diamonds KJ753 Clubs AK3 An expert (Frank Stewart) recommends that West doubles with 14 ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
36 votes
13 answers
10k views

Why is the strong 1NT so prevalent in Bridge?

Bridge is widely considered to be the queen of card games on both sides of the Atlantic. However, there's one huge difference between the way that (most) Americans and (most) Britons play. In ...
thesunneversets's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
1k views

In bridge which bids need alerting?

When playing bridge which bids need to be pointed out/alerted?
user avatar
11 votes
5 answers
445 views

Does it make sense for a defender to lead a short major when opponents fail to find a fit using Stayman?

Both vulnerable, at rubber, South dealt and bid 1NT, North 2 clubs, South 2 hearts, North 3NT. You, West, have (s) 64 (h) AJ7 (d)J8752 (c) Q84. North clearly has four spades, but not hearts. Any ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
8 votes
8 answers
10k views

Getting started with trick-taking games (whist, euchre, bridge, pinochle, etc.) [closed]

I've heard there are a lot of different trick-taking games out there, such as whist, bridge, euchre, pinochle, oh hell, hearts etc. I've heard a lot of good things about these games, but have very ...
Gordon Gustafson's user avatar
7 votes
9 answers
8k views

How should hands that are EXTREMELY strong in one suit (10+ cards) be bid?

I'm a bit of a bridge noob, but I'm kind of puzzled about this. Say I have a hand that is ridiculously strong in one suit, say at least 10 cards with all 4 honors (I'll use spades for the example suit)...
Gordon Gustafson's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
1k views

Bridge guide for experienced Spades player?

I'm a long-time online Spades player who's never played a single hand of Bridge, but I'd love to give it a try sometimes. I've always felt that the games seem rather similar, so I was looking for ...
freekvd's user avatar
  • 4,575
6 votes
3 answers
711 views

Why are Bridge's bid meanings public?

I'm not a Bridge player, but I've been reading about the game. This part of the rules is surprising to me. From Wikipedia's article on Bridge bidding systems, By the rules of the game, the agreed ...
Allure's user avatar
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5 votes
4 answers
1k views

Is Duplicate Bridge (standard Matchpoints) a game of pure skill?

I'm inclined to say "no" because because each of the following could be considered lucky: A finesse can be tried 2 different ways and your partnership selects the one that works You play a routine, ...
Joe Golton's user avatar
  • 8,864
5 votes
3 answers
271 views

Flexibility in Opening two in third seat with 8 points and seven card suit?

Is it against the rules to use your judgement as to whether to open two or three with a seven card suit? Instance was third seat opening with a seven card suit, two of the top five, and 8 points with ...
Diane M.'s user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
389 views

Is it right to refrain from making a takeout double in borderline situations?

In today's bridge column, this example was given: North opened with one diamond. East doubled with (s) Qxx (h)AQxx (d) x (c) ATxxx. This double technically met my 14 point requirement (12 for high ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
5 votes
2 answers
345 views

Do "flat" hands devalue a 4-4 trump fit?

The advantage of a 4-4 trump fit is that you can ruff in either hand, and use the other one as the master hand. But if one or both partners have little ruffing value, then might that advantage be ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
4 votes
3 answers
734 views

How does one evaluate a hand responding to a "strong" two clubs?

When opener bids a "strong" two club, responder bids two diamonds (waiting), and the opener rebids his suit, e.g. two spades, the responder is now the "captain" of the partnership. That's because s/he ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
3 votes
2 answers
746 views

In Bridge, Is There A Way To Shorten "Reaction Time" For "Real Time" Play

I like to solve bridge problems in newspapers. When I do this, I often get the correct answer, or at least come "within sight" (e.g. get the key idea but "muff" the sequence). This process typically ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
2 votes
3 answers
2k views

In bridge, how would you bid the "worst" 14 point hand?

You are playing 15-17 point no trumps, five card majors, four card diamond bids, and three card club bids listed on many convention cards. And you have an unusual 14 high card point 4-4-3-2 hand that ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
2 votes
1 answer
298 views

Par-zero deal with many points for N/S [closed]

This question is about the card game bridge : How many points can N/S have in a par-zero deal ? (Only consider the high card points) In a par-zero deal, no player can make any contract assuming ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 275
2 votes
3 answers
608 views

How do you decide which way to finesse for an ace?

This is from the New York Post, which is to say that it is a "problem." You are declarer (South) in a 3 no trump contract. You get a "friendly" lead in a suit where you have three winners (two in ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
2 votes
2 answers
644 views

In bridge, do people go through cycles of under- and -over bidding?

In the board game Go, there are two basic styles, high and low. "High" is all the rage for about ten years, until people have forgotten how to play "low." Then "low" gets "rediscovered," and people ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
1 vote
1 answer
804 views

In bridge, are there different implications of overcalling 1NT in different positions?

Suppose I had a hand like the following: (s) KJxx (h) xxx (d) AJx (c) AKx. If I were the opening bidder, I would, of course, bid 1NT. (Note to commenter below: In this paragraph, I was describing a "...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
1 vote
3 answers
98 views

When should someone make a minimum bid over a takeout double with 8 or more high card points?

There was this example cited by an expert (Frank Stewart}. On the hand ♠ 943 ♡A52 ♢AQJ ♣ 8732.the SE consensus was that "11" high card points were really more like seven because of the 4-3-3-...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
1 vote
1 answer
338 views

Did a bridge column make errors in discussing a hand?

This is from yesterday's New York Post. North-South are playing at four spades. Vulnerable, they had bid 1 spade, 2 spades, 4 spades, no opposing bids. Here's the hand: North (s) AQ9 ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
0 votes
1 answer
196 views

In bridge, does it make sense to "shade" one's bidding standards with a part score?

For instance, most players today bid five card majors, because that's (probably) the best way to get to a major suit game of ten tricks. But suppose my team has a part score of 40. That means that ...
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.1k
-1 votes
1 answer
885 views

online bridge with 2 casual players vs computer? [closed]

I'd like to play bridge with a partner -- but against a computer so we can take as much time as we like. This option would be especially useful for beginners and people getting back into the game ...
Scott Lawton's user avatar