Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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The design of Go components is all about symmetry. Because perspective shortens the vertical height of the board, the boards are made taller than they are wide. This way they appear to be square when you're playing. Another similar issue occurs with the stones. Black stones appear to be smaller than white stones, so the black stones are actually made ...


4

Sensei’s Library explains under Looking for a place to resign that the expression ‘looking for a place to resign’ means choosing a move which obviously does not work and resigning when your opponent responds correctly. Sensei’s Library also has an article on How to resign which sketches when to resign and enumerates ways of formally indicating that you do ...


2

A "place to resign" in Go is one in which you are clearly behind, and in which most of the major action has been resolved, so that there is no possibility of a "swing" large enough to bring you from loser to winner. Most players will play on if there is a reasonable chance for a "swing" in a particular position, such as a life and death fight for a group, ...


2

A large part of it is probably the quality of the board. The table boards professionals play on in major events have a pyramid shape cut out of the bottom. There are three widely accepted reasons for this: To make sure the inside of the board is dry so it doesn't warp. To improve the clack sound made when playing a stone. To hold the blood of kibitzers ...


1

This is more a matter of etiquette than anything else. One, it creates a "nice" sound on the board. Two, it minimizes the possibility of displacing stones already on the board.


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