77

“Agricola” is the Latin word for “farmer” (dictionary). It is derived from “ager” (“field”) and “-cola” (“-tiller”, “-cultivator”). “Agriculture” shares the same root, and so does “acre” (albeit indirectly). That a Roman general had it as his last name is unrelated.


30

Yes, you can cook them directly. From the rulebook, p.9: 1 Sheep (Stage 1): Place 1 Sheep on this space in the Replenish phase (Phase 2) of each round. A player who selects this action takes all the Sheep from the Action space and must either put them into his farmyard or use an Improvement to turn them into food. Sheep that cannot be pastured or ...


16

The only time that a family member is only fed 1 food instead of 2 food is if that family member was just added to the family in the round that immediately preceded that harvest. In other words, if that family member has never yet taken any actions.


14

I think the house rule will be harmless, and also that after playing a few games, no one will take advantage of partial renovation - because it's a terrible idea. It also introduces unnecessary complexity. Balance: The only balance consequence I see is that the Renovation action can be taken much more often than in standard Agricola. In principle, you could ...


14

It sounds like it's not the randomness of the action spaces that bothers you, but the unknown factor. If you're playing in person and others share your opinion, I'd suggest revealing the cards after they're shuffled and just use something else to track what round you're on. You'd have to keep an eye on upkeep to make sure you're not letting things accumulate ...


14

You can add at most one newborn regardless of the number of empty rooms you might have. The rules are clear on this: After Family Growth, also 1 Minor Improvement (Stage 2): A player may only use this Family growth space if he has more empty rooms than Family members. A player who chooses a Family growth action adds their newborn offspring to the ...


14

The third member will occupy the third room of your house, even if you use the "Family Growth even without a room" action. The relevant rule starts on page 9 of the rule book, under "Family Growth even without a room": Note: If a player who uses this card later extends her home, she may not use the other Family Growth card again until she has more rooms ...


13

The Yoke is talking about the other minor improvements with "Plow" in the name: the Swing Plow, Stump-Jump Plow, Riding Plow, etc. So, for each one that's been built (and is still in play) at the time you build the Yoke, you can immediately plow one field. If nobody has played any of the Plows/Ploughs/Harrow, then it's not useful. It's cheap to build (as ...


12

Normally I wouldn't like to answer my own question, but I have played a lot of online Agricola since posting this one, with the specific goal of taking as little wood as possible, so I hopefully have some interesting new information to provide by now... Wood is a really hard commodity to ignore in Agricola, just because it's so versatile. You need wood for ...


12

Unfenced stables give you a point by removing an unused farmyard space at the end of the game. Since you get -1 point for each unused farmyard space, and stables count as a used farmyard space, they are also 'rewarded' with one point. In order to keep the balance, the rules ensure that you effectively get one point for each stable no matter where it is ...


11

According to the rulebook (pg 9): After Family Growth, also 1 Minor Improvement (Stage 2): A player may only use this Family growth space if he has more empty rooms than Family members. It is irrelevant how the family has grown before and whether the Family members are on the game board or in the farmyard. Since you had four family members and four ...


10

I'm certain you always have the option to beg if you want to. The rules (p.4) say: A player who cannot or does not wish to produce the required Food must take a Begging card for each missing Food - players may not give up members of their family to avoid the need to feed them. At the end of the game, players lose 3 points for each begging card. So your ...


10

You pay the cost a single time when you play the card. That is, you take an action that allows you to play an occupation or minor improvement, pay the cost, take the card from your (secret) hand and put it face up on the table. Note that in your question, you seem to have conflated "play the card" and "use the card". In the rules, "play" is used as I have ...


10

At first, the additional complexity definitely feels like a downside. But once you play enough, the decisions present in the family version become much more intuitive and faster. At that point, the additional complexity becomes a good thing: deciding which minor improvements and occupations to use (and when) becomes a big, interesting decision. And it's not ...


9

No, you have to buy the Major improvement that is above first. This isn't explicitly defined, but it is implied on p.2 of the rules: An advantage of placing 12 of the 14 new Major Improvements underneath others at the start of the game is that the use of the cards does not need to be explained in detail at the start of the game. The only two new Major ...


9

There are a number of options, but if you've only played a couple of times then a Fireplace + sheep is the way to go. Sheep are worth two food each, so a pile of sheep is a valuable commodity. If you can keep them in pastures long enough to breed (i.e. without eating them first), then they're a valuable investment, providing you with two action-free food ...


9

No, the field does not 'top up'. You cannot sow the field again until it is empty again. From the page 6 of the rules: Grain may be sown in empty fields. In the side panel: 1 Grain becomes 3, 1 Vegetable becomes 2. Players can use the Sow action to sow several empty fields at once. It is irrelevant whether Grain or Vegetables was sown in the ...


8

In the family game, it is just a food stockpile, and has no other significance. I think your question stems from the name of the action. Like all other actions, the name 'Traveling Players' refers to how your family member spends their time. As opposed to fishing, collecting wood or planting a field, your family member works in a band of traveling players. ...


8

My initial, gut reaction to this question is "no, the Complex deck is not intrinsically more powerful". Sure, it has some truly standout cards in it - Wet Nurse, I'm looking at you - but for every one of those it has a card with little to no good applications, e.g. Smallholder. There are some strong Minor Improvements, but again, as well as all the ...


8

The "return well" wording is a cost to play the card, just like when other cards show "1 wood" or "2 clay" to play them. So you cannot play a card that says "return well" unless you pay the cost of returning a well. So you need to first purchase the well before you can play Village Well.


8

How about a foamcore insert? I just finished my Agricola foamcore yesterday. I haven't benchmarked the setup and breakdown times (yet). There are no zip top bags to open, it should only take a minute. I have friends who get a little tacklebox organizer for each game. This takes more effort than that, but it's much more customizable. For a crash course ...


8

Yes, you can use each as much as you want. The reason to own more than one is mostly if you get a better one later when you could only afford a cheap one earlier; or to deprive other players of them.


8

During the Work Phase your family members perform Actions that are selected from those currently available on the board. Stage 1 has the Sow and/or Bake Bread Action which will show up sometime during the first four rounds (Other bake actions are also available depending on how many players there are). To use the Bake Bread part of this action you must have ...


7

The rules are pretty clear, the Minor Improvement cards are not used, so you ignore it. Agricola as a Family Game (for 1-5 people from 10 years) In the simplified version of Agricola, the Occupation and Minor Improvement cards are not used - players do not have a hand of cards. The first game board is turned face down, showing the "Agricola ...


7

Ratcatcher ... just too powerful. Taster ... changes the basic mechanic of the game, puts the people in 4 or 5 turn order in a really bad spot. Mail Coach Driver ... messes with people as much as the Taster! Everyone will have to modify their strategy accordingly. I guess the cards "I" think are broken are the ones that change the game FOR EVERYONE, not ...


7

No one can really answer your question directly, but I can give an overview of the four different games and their play styles. Agricola Complex rules and might be a bit heavy for a non-gamer initially. About building a farm. Everyone likes building a farm. "Aggressive" play comes from resource denial Most games will take 30 minutes per player to play. ...


7

My own thoughts: Komplex Deck - Yes. The rules for all occupations and minor improvements are more complex than E-Deck. Some improvements are harder to play. For instance, the Plow(plow 3 fields a time) improvement can be played as a combo in Plow and also Sow but in Complex Deck, this is forbidden. But there are more bonus points can be collected via ...


7

The trade-off is between setup time and maintenance (restocking at the beginning of each turn). We've chosen to split the difference as follows: Each set of player pieces goes into its own ziplock bag. Hand each player a bag at the beginning of the game and let him manage it from there. All the goods (wood, clay, reeds, stone, grain) go into a single ...


7

Not everyone feels the way you do. Agricola is rated #7 on BoardGameGeek seven years after it was released. Agricola is rated as "Medium-Heavy" on BGG with a 3.6 rating out of 5 which means that most people see it as among the more complex games they've played. If you enjoy the family game, there's nothing wrong with just playing that. Without knowing ...


7

I am almost certain this is a UK / US difference. Specifically, I believe it was named this way because of a marketing decision by the US publisher. Research: Although Agricola's creator is Uwe Rosenberg: "a German game designer", the main publisher is Mayfair Games: "an American publisher of board, card, and roleplaying games" As you mentioned "All ...


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