8

There is no rule against a single checker hitting two blots in one turn. At backgammonrules.net (emphasis mine): Hitting blots If a player moves to a point occupied by only one of his opponent's checkers, the checker is hit. Hit checkers are forced to re-enter. This slows their owner down. The opponent proceeds - and a player ahead in the race home ...


6

Either choice is legal. Here's a reference: Q: Can I play low number first when bearing off? Yes, you may play your numbers in either order, as long as each number is played legally.


5

Stacking pieces on the same point is not necessary unless it would otherwise be unclear where those pieces are meant to be. There are no rules about how you place pieces on a point; it is only common sense that mandates clarity on exactly which point a piece occupies. You could stack every subsequent piece on the first one on the same point, if you really ...


5

These were all more or less directly copied from the source attributed at the bottom of the answer: Directly rolling a particular number (e.g. 2) 30.55% Rolling a particular double (e.g. 3-3) 2.77% Rolling a particular non-double (e.g. 5-1) 5.54% Rolling any double 16.66% Chance of getting off the bar with one or two pieces and X open points: ...


5

In your own home board it is often unwise to hit blots unless you can point on them. Leaving two blots in your home board with enemy stones on the bar approaches suicidal in all circumstances I can conceive of just now.


5

The reason that equity is used instead of winning probability is because it is possible to win a single game, a double game (gammon) or triple game (backgammon). Let's say that the value of the game, or bet, is $1. (That would occur if the cube is in the middle. If it has been turned, you multiply by 2, 4, or whatever the number is on the cube.) Let's ...


4

The one of the biggest difference one sees between an experienced and a novice player is that the beginners hit the checkers almost without considering the alternatives. There are lot of positions where you're better off with not hitting. Just a tip to remember: Backgammon is not a game of hits, its a game of positions.


4

The disadvantage of hitting an opposing blot is that you send it to the "bar," where it will re-enter on your home board. That is a bad idea if you have a lot of loose checkers in your home board or coming home, meaning that your opponent will have a number of "retaliation" shots. It is these "retaliation shots" (if they exist), that make it inadvisable to ...


4

Let's set a lower bound on the likelihood of winning with doubles, by simply ignoring all cases where it is impossible to win without doubles. Assumption: All board positions considered are equally likely. This is probably not true, but will approach truth in longer games. Consider the case of two men only left on the board, both in the home court, and not ...


4

A basic rule of backgammon is that you must play in a way that maximises the use of your pips. If you have a board that can use both 3 and 6, you must choose such move over any move that only uses 3 or only uses 6. If you have a board that allows the use of 3 or 6 but not both, you must choose a move that uses only 6 over any move that uses only 3.


3

The rule (as in the link): A rule popular in money play which says that gammons and backgammons count only as a single game if neither player has offered a double during the game. Probably the better way to say it is: If neither player has offered a double during the game, gammons and backgammons do not count. This doesn't turn off the doubling cube, ...


3

The logic of finding the “general rule” in these situations is flawed and will lead to potential mistakes. There are positions where you have to move the highest or the lowest number and need to be able to quickly calculate the numner of dice combinations that are favourable or not for your next roll. In your example, if you leave the checkers at 6,1 points:...


3

Largely it's by convention, but the historic cause is the way optimal doubling cube strategy varies with the match length. In the most easy case, in a 2-point match it can barely be wrong to double as soon as you are ahead, and far too easy to leave doubling too late - which means the match becomes a single game the vast majority of the time. In which case ...


3

I think you are confusing two uses of the word double. If you roll doubles (e.g both dice show 3) you move not two but four counters three spaces ('Movement, 3' here). You can also use the doubling die to increase the stakes at certain times; this has no effect on the game unless your opponent chooses to resign the game rather than play for (and lose) the ...


3

Just to make it an easy and fast rule, a player MUST play the larger part of the roll, if he can play ONLY one part of his dice. In the above example, if red rolls 21, he MUST play 3/1, and is not permitted to play 3/2, this is not a choice, its a mandatory move.


3

This depends heavily on what the opponent has done so far with his runners. If both runners are still on your 1 point, or if only one runner remains in your home board, slotting forward from your 6 point often has a good risk reward. If two split runners exist in your home board (or one runner and one or more opposing men on the bar), you must be much more ...


3

I'd learn the chances for the roll combinations. There are 36 possible rolls, (let's say of one red and one green die) as follows: 6-6: 1/36 11: 2/36 (two 6-5s) 5-5: 1/36 10: 2/36 (two 6-4s) 9: 4/36 (two 6-3s, two 5-4s) 4-4: 1/36 8: 4/36 (two 6-2s, two 5-3s) 7: 6/36 (two 6-1s, two 5-2s, two 4-3s) 3-3: 1/36 6: 4/36 (two 5-1s, two 4-2s) 5: ...


3

Two good rules of thumb are, never resign in a position with contact, and resign if the result is "obvious". If you need to stop and think to work it out then it's probably quicker to just play on to a position of certainty anyway - certainly so online where forced moves (and optionally, greedy bearoffs) can be played automatically. It's generally not ...


2

You may also want to look at the following two books from Gambit Publications: How to Use Computers To Improve Your Chess by Christian Kongsted. The second half is specifically on how to use chess computers to improve our play. Secrets of Practical Chess by John Nunn The new edition has an expanded chapter on chess computers. You can download PDF samples ...


2

Yes, Plakoto is played elsewhere - in Bulgaria, where it is called Tapa. It seems to be the same game as "Jail", described here: http://www.vitalinfocenter.com/bckgmn/jail.html


2

Do some statistical analysis on the possible rolls: The average value of all rolls will be zero. 41.667% (5/12ths) of all rolls will be negative. 41.667% (5/12ths) of all rolls will be positive. 16.667% (1/6th) of all rolls will be zero. It seems like it would have a random walk type of effect, with no one being able to move very far (as @tttppp pointed ...


2

You can "translate" the word "equity" as a value of the particular position. Lets imagine we are one roll away from ending the match and we only have two checkers on deuce point. We will win with the probabilty of 26/36 and we will lose with the probability of 10/36. Lets also imagine that there is a friend who offers us some money and asks us to abandon ...


2

The chance of getting a total of x on the two dice is simply (6-|7-x|)/36 where |7-x| is the absolute value of 7-x.


2

No, as per the official backgammon rules of the US Backgammon Federation you cannot move in this instance, and your turn is over. If there is no checker on the point indicated by the roll, the player must make a legal move using a checker on a higher-numbered point. If there are no checkers on higher-numbered points, the player is permitted (and required) ...


2

The easiest rule change would be to disallow hits made in a home board. Extending a nuance from this rule, would be to disallow hits made in a home board unless they come from a point on the outer board or only if the piece is entering the opponent's home board or unless the roll is a double, then one piece may be entered on the point and make the hit This ...


2

Mathematically speaking, you should minimise the average number of additional dice needed to bear off all checkers. This implies a minimisation of the number of dropped rolls - rolls that do not remove a checker from your home, but only advance it further. Suppose you move the three to the one and leave the six there on the first turn. On the second turn, ...


2

Paul Magriel's notation system originally appeared in his 1976 book Backgammon, and is mostly just a codification of notations systems that existed at the time. This could be considered the "official" specification for the notation, but really it's usage is just customary. His followup An Introduction to Backgammon also includes the notation, but has an ...


1

For small numbers of chequers, the relative odds can be calculated exactly as described by other answers. For cases of too many chequers to perform calculations in your head, the following heuristic has long been recommended by championship players: Divide the home board into three buckets as follows: Bucket 1 is the 1 & 2 points; Bucket 2 is the 3 &...


1

The question is more generally about when to leave pieces in your opponents home board. If those pieces are safe, you can theoretically leave them there until all of your other pieces are in your home board. The question is, should you? The advantage of leaving these pieces is threefold. It forces your opponent to play safe when bringing pieces towards ...


1

In The Backgammon Book, World Champions Oswald Jacoby and John Crawford recommend with both 6-2 and 6-3 moving one runner to the bar point and one man from the 12-point into your own outer table; though they concede that there another move almost as good: The modern play [written in 1970] is to use the six to move one back man to the black bar point and ...


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