Hot answers tagged

14

I think the house rule will be harmless, and also that after playing a few games, no one will take advantage of partial renovation - because it's a terrible idea. It also introduces unnecessary complexity. Balance: The only balance consequence I see is that the Renovation action can be taken much more often than in standard Agricola. In principle, you could ...


14

I hardly feel that they just guess or take it on the feels when coming up with the cards cost and ability limitations. Actually, they kinda do. Mana cost depends on several factors: How common the card's ability is in the color. Flight for example, is generally least expensive in Blue, White is slightly more expensive, and red/black slightly more, and ...


14

The goal in TTR is not "complete the cards you're given", it's "get the most points". There are plenty of ways to do this with short routes (e.g. by focusing on building only length 4+, not going for longest route, and picking the spots where everyone wants to go). If no one in your group wants to adjust their play style to match the cards they're dealt, ...


10

That particular rule isn't particularly balanced, and is included for convenience. However, playing with fewer cards in hand also imbalances the game, as storytellers have fewer cards to choose from to come up with a good hint, and other players have fewer options to play in. Turns as the storyteller aren't the same value as other turns either; the ...


9

Mathematically the Pie rule can be generalized. This is actually a well known problem. One of the solutions is to let people take it in turns to add what they want from the common lot to a set of goods until one person calls that he wants that set. For example, in the 40 thieves problem, the goal is to share the bounty in 40 equal sets, which seems ...


9

I can imagine this system working better if implemented as an additional layer to the general action system, rather than a standalone concept of managing actions - let me outline what I have in mind: each action a unit can take has a cost each player has an amount of action points that regenerate each turn (not all have to be used, but you can't save any ...


7

Definitions A turn consists of one player being the story teller and all other players guessing. A round consists of as many turns as there are players, so that every player has been the story teller once. A game is completely fair if only full rounds have been played, and players have the same number of cards to choose from in each turn. A ...


7

The standard way to create balance in Axis & Allies is to use secret bidding. For example, bid an amount of money that Germany would get extra at the start of the first round of the game (the one bidding lowest gets to play Germany). For example, two players bid in secret. Player A bids 20 and player B bids 25. This means Player A gets to play the ...


7

"Apparently the ship can't turn and can only go forward, with a bit of steering." You are correct, this is something my heroes often complain about that I explain by saying the map is too small for the ship to turn meaningfully. It's a design flaw that isn't easily fixed without changing the course so it isn't squares. "The rocks sink the ship oneshot, ...


7

I disagree that the player who draws the longest routes has an advantage. A winning play in Ticket to Ride (TTR) doesn't boil down simply to that. Here are a few reasons why I don't think changing the rules is necessary (according to my many many TTR games played): Many games can be won by completing only small routes, and by using connections that are ...


6

[EDIT] As promised I'm getting back with more stats. TL;DR: You can view an interactive version of the stats in this js fiddle There are 3 tables. One for sides only, one for wonders only and one for wonders and sides. Long version200 games played. Taking into account sides only (ignoring wonders) results into a pretty good balance in points average. Side A ...


6

I concur that there is, indeed cannot be, a hard-and-fast formula for translating a new card to a mana cost. Bear in mind that different blocks have different power levels. A card that may have been severely overpowered in one environment is average in a different one. A card that may have been costed 1R in last year's block may become 2R in development ...


6

Root is highly asymmetrical While each faction has technically the same goal (reach 30 victory points), and there are some universal ways of gaining victory points (destroying your opponents' cardboard, and crafting items), each faction has its own unique mechanics for playing and earning other victory points. The Marquis of Cats earn victory points by ...


5

In my experience, if you're playing the Saboteur base game with a group of experienced players, the saboteurs have a better chance of winning than the gold diggers. During the first few (5-10 maybe) games, most gold diggers will get plenty of satisfaction from a 'team win'. If there are 5 diggers and 2 saboteurs, and this results in a 5 vs 2 play stile, the ...


5

The easiest way I can think of to balance this sort of mechanic is to have certain actions only be available at certain momentum levels. In particular, you could introduce a class of "desperate actions" for cases when the momentum is too far in your opponent's favor. Obviously this would depend on exactly what sort of game you're designing and exactly what ...


5

Something to note because many people are confused by this issue... The skill of the players is irrelevant to komi. Komi is defined as the number of points given to white such that perfect play will yield a tie. (For example, komi on a 3x3 board is known to be 9 using Chinese rules because perfect play will wipe white completely from the board, and it's 9 ...


5

Playtesting is by far the best option (and how all major (and minor) trading card games) have been designed. Do not only pitch the two decks against each other, but also against other decks. Other than that, if the rules are simple enough, you can do some mathematical analysis. E.g. for Magic: The Gathering, compare the mana curves of the decks, and if both ...


4

Another possibility: This doesn't follow the letter of the rules, but since it's a translation, I think it might be more appropriate to attempt to follow the spirit of the rules. There's several characters (most, even) whose special abilities essentially are like having a "built-in" item. Willy the Kid has a built-in Volcanic, Paul Regret has a ...


4

This is just off the top of my head, but if the issue you're having is that someone needs to be 'stuck' there, then how about giving everyone a special action to skip their whole turn to "radio the driver" to take the action. This way, effectively, any player can be it without having to be in the truck, and people can take turns. Try it out, and if it ...


4

There does seem to be a pattern to how they balance the cards and their costs("A 1/1 creature should cost 1 or 2, and abilities such as first strike or haste might add 1 to that cost" as a baseline and then scaled up for more powerful cards), and most players have a pretty good eye for whether something is good for its cost or not. But I'm not so certain ...


4

The game tends to be much easier for the Hunter player. They have 8 pieces that can kill animals, while the animals only have the 2 bears. Yes, hunters can only attack in a certain direction, but they can move as far as they want, while Bears have to creep up on the hunters.


4

Efficiency and focus is the name of the game in Imperial Assault. Let's look at your specific issues: Running out of time My group ran into a similar issue until we realized that many of the missions in Imperial Assault are not designed to be completed by "clearing the dungeon". Instead, we had to pay careful attention to the specific mission objectives ...


4

Make sure that single actions can have multiple different outcomes depending on how and when they are used Strategic complexity is created when a player has multiple mutually exclusive actions* they can take which could all theoretically lead to victory, and the player has to figure out which one is the best. The more plausible options they have, the more ...


4

Alright, so I found google docs with cards, added some more data concerning base sets and made a diagram with it. I used a sophisticated formula of counting only half of the trade from ally and scrap abilities and counting optional abilities as full trade. Google docs data Here are some diagrams I came up with: This one shows generated trade by card costs,...


3

There is some strategies that can make you human group win. Is hard to fight the cylons in the board game (exactly like the TV show), but not impossible, even without changing the resources markers to a easier scenario. Here some of them: Have a balanced team, including the Support character: try to establish a balanced team, considering the number of ...


3

From page 28 of the rulebook: To make the game easier for the human players, start the game with 2 more of each resource (10 food, 10 fuel, 12 morale, and 14 population). However, it's worth mentioning that the core game is very balanced, especially with 5 players. The expansions arguably make it more difficult. It sounds like you're not playing very ...


3

You really do need to read the rules, more thoroughly than it sounds as if the rest of the group has done. If you do, you will find that RoR is not a common-or-garden multiplayer game where an ally is somebody you have no reason to attack at present; it is designed so that the players all have to genuinely co-operate to keep the state going, and the winner ...


3

Having read the other answers, they seem to hit most of the right topics. You start with a basic formula to get a good idea of what it should cost, perhaps using previous sets examples. (Not as easy if its your first set, mind you...) This is the cost recommended by design. You tweak the card on an individual basis to emphasize or deemphasize particular ...


3

The two sides are not designed to be balanced. On 6 out of 7 wonders in the base game, side A has been in fact created to ease new players in the game, by providing a common pattern among them: 3 Victory Points Variable power 7 Victory Points Side B is almost always strictly better than side A. Here's a detailed approach, from my point of view. Alexandria ...


3

How much have you played? I agree that someone who gets lucky and gets several long tickets that are all along the same route will have a big advantage. However, other players can disrupt the player by blocking his routes... in which case he loses a lot points. Also - the 1910 expansion has a 'most tickets' complete bonus -which gives a bonus 15 points....


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