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13

Assuming you are playing some simple form of standard american, yes your thinking was wrong on both hands. Usually the responder is supposed to "bid up the line", giving preference to majors in case she has a 6-9 point hand. With the first hand, you can either bid 1D or 1S. The reason to bid 1S instead of 1D is that the auction 1C-1D-1H-1S might have a ...


11

2 sections to my answer: How to get up and running in 20 minutes Next steps to progress from the 20 minute version to solid Bridge beginner How to get up and running in 20 minutes It's simply not possible to play the full game of bridge itself after 20 minutes in a way that satisfies or even makes any sense. However, one can make use of a Gateway game ...


11

Law 20 of The Laws of Duplicate Bridge deals with review and explanation of calls. Quoting partially: F. Explanation of Calls During the auction and before the final pass, any player may request, but only at his own turn to call, an explanation of the opponents’ prior auction. He is entitled to know about calls actually made, about ...


10

"It takes 26 points to make a game" is clearly a rule of thumb, not a hard rule. Anyone who has played more than a few hands of Bridge should be able to see that, sometimes, light hands combined with intelligent play make a contract; and, sometimes, a solid point count is brought down by a bad lie of cards or a clever defence. I don't think any of this is ...


10

Holding AKx Kx QJxxxx Kx, it is unsatisfying and misleading to open 1D and rebid 3D. Most of your values are outside of diamonds and in fact you have decent stopping positions in all other suits. Opening 1NT conveys the hand type and playing strength more accurately.


10

Because the level of 3NT is too high to be supported by opener's values with only 20-21 HCP. Even 2NT is challenging if partner shows up with a bust opposite 20-21. The appropriate way to show an 18-19 point hand using this style is to open 1 of a minor suit, and jump to 2NT over partner's response, as a forcing rebid. Part of the challenge in bidding is ...


9

What North and South did is not a take out double, but a conventional response to a strong club opening. One of the most important things to do facing a strong club is to intervene, making it more difficult for the opposing side to reach the optimum contract. You don't want you opponents to relay themselves into a hard to bid (grand)slam that no one else ...


9

The website http://OhioEuchre.Com/ has much information on bidding strategies. Euchre is a game of chance where aggression pays off. The more you play the better you will get. Take chances! Even when you are getting euchred you're learning more about the game. The person that said there is little strategy to euchre is incorrect. Just play in any tournament....


9

Your partner's response(s) ought to give you a good idea of whether a no trumps contract is the correct one to pursue, or if you might be better off looking elsewhere. Perhaps your partner will bid Stayman over your NT bid. If you find a satisfactory fit in hearts or spades, then the question of whether you have a shortage somewhere else becomes irrelevant ...


9

A system is proper use of conventions. Genuine beginners don't need any conventions, so don't worry about what system to use. Just start with "If you have 13 points, bid your longest suit, or the stronger of 2 equal" and a few similar rules. (As Joe implied, use the weak or strong no-trump that is common in your area; neither is intrinsically more natural)....


9

There are several common situations with different handlings: Opener to your right bids your best suit and you have 12+ points: Pass and hope partner can make a balancing double, which you can then convert to penalty by passing. Update The rationale in this case is that opponents, if partner is bust or close to it, actually have sufficient strength to bid ...


8

An Alternative Method Most players will learn when to bid by feel, but for those who are not yet at that point or prefer something more concrete, you can assign a score to your hand, in order to determine whether you should bid. Some players use a 3-2-1 point system, with the bowers worth 3 points each, face trumps worth 2 points each, and low trumps or ...


8

You bid it like you’d bid any other minimum balanced hand with no five-card major. Open one of a minor. Rebid NT, raise partner’s major, or pass partner’s 1NT as appropriate. Which minor you open is a matter of partnership agreement. The usual agreement in the US is that 1D can be on three with this shape, but there are some who prefer to have 1D always be ...


8

Your understanding is correct: South would be the declarer, playing a contract of two spades doubled. Doubles (and redoubles) never change who is declarer, just the scores for making or failing to make the contract.


8

Whatever the result of playing 3D was stands. Bidding incorrectly is not (usually) a violation of the laws of contract bridge.


8

Has Marty Bergen's hand evaluation system been validated experimentally? Yes - but not (as far as I know) with a Monte Carlo simulation. Experts have long known (and I mean long known - since before I learned the game in 1972) that Aces were undervalued and Quacks (Queens and Jacks) over-valued in Work's Point Count. Numerous remedies have been suggested ...


8

Other than the pedantic answer (any time Declarer can't possibly make), there are plenty of times that it doesn't have the impact you're suggesting. First off, there are a lot of ways you can end up in a doubled contract. You might make a negative double and then your partner passes to convert to penalty, for example. That gives declarer some information, ...


7

Sure the JS is a fairly pointless HCP, but the spade shortness is worth something in a trump game. It's the kind of hand that should definitely be opened, but only at the 1 level. The point of opening the hand is to let partner know you've got something, at which point you're looking for a 4-4 heart fit. So in my opinion the hand should be opened, a ...


7

If the diamond quality is vastly better than the clubs, then open 1D planning on rebidding clubs; otherwise open 1C. If the club quality is vastly better than the diamonds, then open 1C and plan on rebidding 1NT if partner responds 1H; the club suit can be expected to run in such a situation, and so how much trouble can you get into in 1NT. Remember that ...


7

A common bridge principle for SAYC is to bid up strong hands slowly, but jump to a high bid quickly with weak hands that have long suits or other preemptive features. In the situation you describe with responder having 13 points, you'll want bidding space to communicate whether or not you should be in game or slam, because opener has promised 13-21 points (...


7

This is a curious question. You note that the context is five card majors, four card diamond bids, and three card club bids. When you agreed to play this system you must have realized that you would occasionally pick up a 4=4=3=2 hand. What was your plan? Never mind the ones with 14 HCP, how about 12 or 13 HCP? I play 4-card diamond suits with one partner. ...


7

I can't speak for most experts, but I can speak for myself. I never downgrade a balanced 15-count. I occasionally upgrade a balanced 14-count, and I know several good players who do it more frequently (and announce "a good 14-17" when their partners open). Likewise, I never downgrade an 18-count into a 1NT opener, but occasionally upgrade a 17-count into a 1-...


7

From the English Bridge Union Blue Book (Rules and Ethics): Unless it is announceable ( see 4 D , 4 E, 4 F and 4 G ), a pass or bid must be alerted if it : (a) is not natural; or (b) is natural but has a potentially unexpected meaning ('Natural' has a long paragraph of definition; a natural pass is "A pass which does not ...


7

Rule of 13 trumps Rule of 15. If you have 13 points you open. If you read the first few sentences of the article you linked, it says clearly you only apply that when you have 9-12 points.


7

tl;dr 2H I think you need to understand the concept of Captaincy. During the process of bidding, it is not always the case where both players are trying to exchange information on an even ground. Sometimes one player will become the Captain and await his partner to give him the information. In other words, the Captain has the say to this bidding sequence. ...


7

In duplicate bridge, 6 spades making 6 is 980 not vulnerable, and 7 clubs doubled down 8 not vulnerable (5 tricks made out of 13 contracted) is -2000. With nobody vulnerable, you'd have to make 9 tricks to come out ahead bidding 7 over 6, scoring -800 for down 4. Not vulnerable, doubled undertricks score accordingly: -1: -100 -2: -300 -3: -500 -4: -800 -5: ...


7

You are, within certain constraints designed to prevent wholly destructive bidding systems, allowed to make any call that is: any of a sufficient bid; a valid Double or Redouble; or Pass; and not otherwise constrained by penalty under the Laws of Rubber Bridge consequent to a prior irregularity. However your opponents are entitled to a full and complete ...


6

You should have responded 1♠ to indicate 4+ spades. 1NT response denies 4-card major. Yes, your partner reversed. Since you denied 4 spades, opener's rebid 2♠ is unusual and hence a reverse. Opener's reverse promises at least invitational values. If the opener has a minimum hand, he bids no higher than 2♦. With a balanced hand, he ...


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