14

The small board focuses on close fighting. You're right; it is recommended for beginners for developing fighting skill and tactics, but the strategy component is lacking--at least when compared to a 19x19 board. The big board is not just like playing 4 small board games next to each other. Through ladders and potential escape routes, the stones on one side ...


12

There are some common sizes and yes, they depend. It's not really about which side of whatever ocean you're from, but rather about what factory you make them in. For example, if you ask a factory that produces a 60x42 cm board (random values, here!), they will have these settings in their printing, cutting and folding machines. They will probably accept if ...


11

Well one point towards squares is simplicity. It is a much easier system to grok (outside of weird rules for diagonals) The most important thing to consider is what your playing field is. If you are talking about a mostly open plain with very few obstacles, then a hex field is great as it avoids the diagonal rule cleanly. However if you were going with, ...


8

Almost all go boards are x by x, where x is an odd number (e.g. 9, 13, or 19). The point is to have the product yield an odd number of potential points. So that there would be an odd number of points in the game and a clear winner. (In the Japanese counting style of "points," it is possible for both players to have the same number, but under the Chinese ...


7

On an even sized board it is much easier to mirror your opponent's moves (this special tactic is known as "mane go"). Playing the tengen point on an odd sized board is a move that cannot be mirrored.


6

To use a metaphor, what's the difference between a barroom brawl and a full-scale war? The brawl is faster and just as decisive at the end, but if you rush the front lines of an opposing army swinging a barstool, you'll probably not get very far. You need to rely on your commanders and your fellow soldiers to get you close enough that your barstool will ...


4

What is the nature of your game? Combat, commerce, both? This might shape the role of movement in your game as well. Hex-based maps makes movement slight less expensive, especially when trying to around obstacles. For example, if the player is trying to move their token from South to North, but another player's token is in their way. On a square-based ...


4

consider looking at how other games solve this problem, For example Settlers of Catan adds a "sea" around the boad which fills in the uneven edges when using full hexagons and gives a uniform diamond at the edge. Something along those lines might be the best way to resolve your problem. Alternatively you can design your overall boards such that the overflow ...


4

The number of stones for a board is meant to be effectively infinite. The typical procedure if players run out is to exchange captured stones in equal quantities and continue with them. This means that enough stones so that either player could completely fill the board is guaranteed to be enough stones.


3

Mage Knight: The Board Game uses a series of boards that are made of smaller hexes. Each board is 7 hexes and connects to the adjacent board. There are also symbols along the edges which dictate the orientation of each board.


3

The 19x19 board is considered the most interesting configuration because of the strategic and tactical scenarios it enables. $$cm1 $$ +---------------------------------------+ $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . a . . x . b . x . b . x . . a . . | $$ | . . . B . B . b . B . b . B . B . . . | $$ |...


3

The winning strategy for such a small Hex board is shown in this basic strategy guide. Like tic-tac-toe, on a 4x4 board white will always win by opening on the main diagonal, because for every counter that black can make, there is another way for white to force the win. Once white can form a "two-bridge" by placing the second piece in a non-adjacent space ...


3

As long as the grid is even, Othello should play just fine, provided you change the staring cluster. . . . . . . B W . . B W B . . . W B . should do, with white moving first...


3

Indoor areas or city terrain can be easier to represent using squares because they tend to follow 90 degree angles anyway. Most games with movement in a dungeon or similar places use squares. There are board and miniature games that combine hex or free movement outside of cities with square movement in cities. I have seen tabletop RPGs played with a hex map ...


2

Publishers and designers who use consistent (if not standard) sized boxes (such as Queen Games, Friedmann Friese, etc) often end up with semi-standard board sizes as a side effect. If the inside of your box is 12x8" then you're going to end up with boards that are a multiple of that size, usually a 2x2 or 2x3 of folds of that size.


2

If interlocking hexes are what you are inquiring about, Heroscape patented that idea when it introduced them. As US Patent law has a default term of 20 years, even if not extended via patent term adjustment, and Heroscape was introduced in 2004, their patent has not yet expired, and Hasbro is definitely still occasionally making use of it (such as in their ...


2

Many games have a playfield made up of hexagons. Some games also contain interlocking tiles/sheets that are made up of hexagons (e.g. Clans of Caledonia, Wombat Rescue). I'm not aware of any that use plastic sheets, other than Heroscape. Nor am I aware of any that use an interlocking mechanism like Heroscape used. But it's interesting to note that the size ...


1

I would recommend to use Chinese scoring, where prisoners are given back to your opponent. Go is played on a 19x19 board and comes with 181 black stones and 180 white stones. This is to accommodate filling every spot on the board with a stone. Think about this: you'll never fill every spot in a game of go. Also, technically it is possible that one ...


1

I think you could follow the same formula you've listed for other boards and you will be fine. That is black gets half the square of the number of lines rounded up and white gets half the square of the number of lines rounded down. In a regular game you will not need more stones. That may not be true for go variants.


1

Hexagons are naturally dividable into 6 equilateral triangles. Or you could opt for other than hexagonal boards. If you want hexagonal tiles, you could have collections of 7 (a central one with 6 surrounding ones), 10 (2 central ones with 8 surrounding ones), 12 (3 central ones with 9 surrounding ones), 14 (4 central ones with 10 surrounding ones) or 19 (7 ...


1

Doing a comparison on how other games do it is your best option. However, don't limit yourself to just other board games. The first game that comes to mind is Heroes of Might and Magic 3. You should be able to see how they constructed 'boards' in that. Like @Patters said, Catan is a great example. Hecatomb is a card game that leveraged odd shaped cards and ...


1

I don't think 'optimal' is easy to answer without getting into personal preference. There are certainly minimal and maximal sizes. A good example of a very small grid would be Halma (or Go). A good example of a large grid would be human chess. As long as you can make out the pieces and see the whole board. So it depends on the size, complexity, variation and ...


1

Just speculation: Boards with even lengths are rarely used because there is no tengen and because handicap stones cannot be placed point symmetrically in a 9x9 grid.


1

There is a fairly famous othello variation called octagon othello. it's basically played on a 10x10 board with the corner regions cut out. .... ...... ........ .......... ....ox.... ....xo.... .......... ........ ...... .... You suddenly not only have 4 corners but 8. The basic game play is still fine (even with the standard start position). ...


1

Early in my Go education I played black with a 4 stone handicap on a 13x13 board. My opponent invaded the 3,3 point in all four corners, and I played the Joseki perfectly - but lost miserably. On a 19x19 board I would have been in healthy shape with tremendous influence into the centre, as well as 4 half-sides, instead of owning a tiny area barely half ...


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