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22

Playing cards in such a way as to not accurately reflect your hand is perfectly fine - as long as that's actually what you're doing. There are plenty of hands where you're on defense and you know that partner is pretty much worthless; you're defending 3NT, partner knows your long suit, and you have 14 points anyway and expect partner to be in the lead ...


18

Against No Trump the point is to set up tricks that will be guaranteed. Here the KQJT9 is four safe tricks - so you lead from that hoping to later get in with the diamond King. When you do get in, either with a spade from partner or a diamond, you have four tricks guaranteed that will set the contract. By convention, from a run like that you lead the top ...


13

Joe has absolutely correctly answered your question. Let me discuss why this argument is being made. Part of what makes bridge so challenging is that unlike chess, it is a game of incomplete information (another part is that unlike poker, all 52 cards are in play). One of the goals of the bidding and the play is to pass enough information about your hand ...


12

If you routinely take 2-3 seconds before each play of the cards, that is ethical. If you usually play cards more quickly, but take a pause when you have a problem, that is ethical. If, on the other hand, you usually play cards more quickly, take a pause when you have a problem, and sometimes take a pause when you don't have a problem to throw declarer off, ...


12

Law 20 of The Laws of Duplicate Bridge deals with review and explanation of calls. Quoting partially: F. Explanation of Calls During the auction and before the final pass, any player may request, but only at his own turn to call, an explanation of the opponents’ prior auction. He is entitled to know about calls actually made, about relevant alternative ...


11

This isn't for the purpose of excluding the player from the game - and typically the player in that seat will physically move the cards requested by the declarer to be played. The idea is that dummy's hand (and only that hand) becomes public information, creating an asymmetry - the declarer knows all 26 cards that will be used to try to make the contract, ...


10

The reason that K is traditionally lead from AK is because there are two important circumstances where a different signal is requested from partner (rather than attitude). The Ace lead is reserved for these particular circumstances because it is very important that there be no ambiguity in these circumstances: Notrump: The Ace lead against notrump signals a ...


10

Holding AKx Kx QJxxxx Kx, it is unsatisfying and misleading to open 1D and rebid 3D. Most of your values are outside of diamonds and in fact you have decent stopping positions in all other suits. Opening 1NT conveys the hand type and playing strength more accurately.


10

Because the level of 3NT is too high to be supported by opener's values with only 20-21 HCP. Even 2NT is challenging if partner shows up with a bust opposite 20-21. The appropriate way to show an 18-19 point hand using this style is to open 1 of a minor suit, and jump to 2NT over partner's response, as a forcing rebid. Part of the challenge in bidding is ...


9

Subject to certain constraints set by the governing authority (the A.C.B.L. in North America) mostly to restrict agreements intended primarily to interfere with opponents bidding, a bridge pair is allowed to make any agreement about the meaning of calls (including bids as well as passes, doubles and redoubles) and cards played as long as they present their ...


9

There are several common situations with different handlings: Opener to your right bids your best suit and you have 12+ points: Pass and hope partner can make a balancing double, which you can then convert to penalty by passing. Update The rationale in this case is that opponents, if partner is bust or close to it, actually have sufficient strength to bid ...


9

From Law 76 in the American Contract Bridge League laws, Honours may be claimed until the next hand has been dealt or the rubber has been completed and scored – whichever comes sooner. Law 78 also states, with my emphasis on the specific relevant example, When it is acknowledged by a majority of the players that a scoring error was made in recording ...


9

Is it ethical? Sure, and it's done all the time (for real bridge reasons, see Joe's answer). It is not required to help declarer when it won't help partner. What's not ethical is telling the opponents your signalling method, and then having it not be. "We play standard carding" is not the same as "we agreed standard carding but since my ...


9

Fourth highest is from a suit with no sequence - four small, or one honor and three small, that sort of thing. It’s a good lead, it gives you some chance to promote one or more of the small to a trick. However, when you have a se quence it’s important to lead from that sequence for two reasons. First, you may give up a trick if you don’t - in the absurd ...


8

From Laws of Contract Bridge 2014: Law 42 – Dummy’s Rights Dummy is entitled to give information as to fact or Law but may not initiate the discussion, and provided he has not forfeited his rights (see Law 43), he may also (a) ask declarer (but not a defender), when he has failed to follow suit, whether he has a card of the suit led. (b) try to prevent ...


8

You bid it like you’d bid any other minimum balanced hand with no five-card major. Open one of a minor. Rebid NT, raise partner’s major, or pass partner’s 1NT as appropriate. Which minor you open is a matter of partnership agreement. The usual agreement in the US is that 1D can be on three with this shape, but there are some who prefer to have 1D always be ...


8

I believe that cases 1-3 are all ethical, but these are simple problems that should have been solved at the end of some earlier trick (In duplicate bridge, after all the cards to a trick have been faced, players should indicate that they are thinking about the hand by keeping their card face up. Play does not proceed until all players have turned their cards ...


8

I can't speak for most experts, but I can speak for myself. I never downgrade a balanced 15-count. I occasionally upgrade a balanced 14-count, and I know several good players who do it more frequently (and announce "a good 14-17" when their partners open). Likewise, I never downgrade an 18-count into a 1NT opener, but occasionally upgrade a 17-count into a 1-...


8

Your understanding is correct: South would be the declarer, playing a contract of two spades doubled. Doubles (and redoubles) never change who is declarer, just the scores for making or failing to make the contract.


8

Whatever the result of playing 3D was stands. Bidding incorrectly is not (usually) a violation of the laws of contract bridge.


8

Has Marty Bergen's hand evaluation system been validated experimentally? Yes - but not (as far as I know) with a Monte Carlo simulation. Experts have long known (and I mean long known - since before I learned the game in 1972) that Aces were undervalued and Quacks (Queens and Jacks) over-valued in Work's Point Count. Numerous remedies have been suggested ...


8

Other than the pedantic answer (any time Declarer can't possibly make), there are plenty of times that it doesn't have the impact you're suggesting. First off, there are a lot of ways you can end up in a doubled contract. You might make a negative double and then your partner passes to convert to penalty, for example. That gives declarer some information, ...


8

In pair competitions, yes absolutely ; everything about each hand is identical every time it is played. The dealer and vulnerability is determined by the board number usually - a sixteen board rotation covering all combinations of dealer and vulnerability. The holder has a number and the dealer and vulnerability marked on it. See this picture from wikipedia: ...


8

In matchpoints, your score is based on how many people you got a better score than. Doesn’t matter what the score is - just is it better. So if 10 pairs play a hand, and 8 bid the game; one bids part score; and you: Bid the game: if it makes you get 5 points, if it goes down you get 4 points. Bid the part score: if the game makes you get 0.5 points, if it ...


8

When you bid differently from most of the other players, you increase your variance. Being in a different contract than everyone else makes it more likely you will get a very good score, but also more likely that you will get a very bad score, while reducing your chance of getting an average-ish score. Now, people who listen to bridge advice and read bridge ...


8

2c seems clear. This redouble doesn't offer good matchpoint odds. +180 and +380 rate to both score well, but -200 will often be much worse than -100. The reason is that -200 will lose to any part-score your opponents might make.


7

This is a curious question. You note that the context is five card majors, four card diamond bids, and three card club bids. When you agreed to play this system you must have realized that you would occasionally pick up a 4=4=3=2 hand. What was your plan? Never mind the ones with 14 HCP, how about 12 or 13 HCP? I play 4-card diamond suits with one partner. ...


7

There is a standard pattern here that may be applied to numerous difficult decisions: Politely inform Declarer that as he cannot contest the explanation of play provided by the defenders, you must tentatively accept their version, and thus are required by law to assign the normal revoke penalty. Inform Declarer that he is entitled to appeal this ruling, and ...


7

Interesting question. First, a terminology issue. You refer to teams, but then only discuss the partnership of a player and his partner. Note that Duplicate Bridge is also played as a true team game, with teams of 4 players playing head-to-head, with each having a partnership sitting NS at one table and EW at the other. In this format the teams often are 6 ...


7

The two games have some similarities. But they have a lot of differences too. Spades is a lot simpler, and so going from Bridge to Spades is relatively easy. Going from Spades to Bridge, well you're slightly ahead of the curve in having played a trick-based partnership game, but there is still a lot of other stuff to learn. To be honest, any general ...


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