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21

To best understand the answer to this question, it helps to understand the purpose of bidding and bidding systems. Bidding is an attempt by two partners to predict the number of tricks their combined hands can win in the play. The purpose of bidding is for each partnership to ascertain which contract, whether made or defeated and whether bid by them or by ...


16

East reneged (played an out-of-suit card when they had a card of the correct suit), but fixed the error before the next trick; since they're the defender, two things happen: East's small spade is left face up on the table in front of East. It's a "major penalty" card, and must be played by East as soon as it is legal to do so, on some future trick. (...


14

Here are some situations where underruffing might be required. 1) Execute a Throw In Consider the following situation, where spades are trump and south is the declarer. The lead is with West and he leads a diamond. - xxx - - - KQT - - AKQ - - - AJ9 - - - South holding the AJ9 of trumps needs ...


13

I'm going to go for a "so simple it's possibly insulting" answer here. Hopefully it won't actually be taken amiss! Bridge is a complicated game. There's a lot to take in, and in many ways there is no end to the amount of obsessive fine-tuning you can do to your system. A beginning player who has just brought a fat Bridge tome and read bits and pieces of ...


13

Assuming you are playing some simple form of standard american, yes your thinking was wrong on both hands. Usually the responder is supposed to "bid up the line", giving preference to majors in case she has a 6-9 point hand. With the first hand, you can either bid 1D or 1S. The reason to bid 1S instead of 1D is that the auction 1C-1D-1H-1S might have a ...


13

In an ACBL tournament, yes, your play is improper.. In fact, hesitating in this situation is specifically called out as unacceptable. From the Laws of Duplicate Bridge, in the section under Proprieties: (emphasis mine) "A player may not attempt to mislead an opponent by means of remark or gesture, through the haste or hesitancy of a call or play (as in ...


13

Bridge players hate guessing. Allowing non-disclosure will basically turn the game into a pointless guessing game, with luck (and to some extent, the bidding system) becoming the predominant factor, rather than skill. This will surely drive away the good players, and all that will be left will be self proclaimed bidding theorists... Just because you cannot ...


12

Great question! The basic idea is that by playing the card you are known to hold, you do not give declarer any extra information and might mislead declarer about the length of your holding in that suit (the falsecarding bit). (btw, your example about west leading Q and you playing K from Kx not to disclose your A is not completely right. If East has the A, ...


12

If you have 10+ spades in your hand, you will never let a contract die out in 3S now, would you? It really depends on the hand, but people play the following two conventions which might potentially be useful (of course, there might be others). Namyats. This is to distinguish hands which are too strong for just preempting 4S. You show stronger hands by ...


12

If you routinely take 2-3 seconds before each play of the cards, that is ethical. If you usually play cards more quickly, but take a pause when you have a problem, that is ethical. If, on the other hand, you usually play cards more quickly, take a pause when you have a problem, and sometimes take a pause when you don't have a problem to throw declarer off, ...


11

In Duplicate Bridge the penalty for a revoke (failing to follow suit) is very clear. The official rules handle revokes in Laws 61 to 64. Wikipedia's summary of 61-64 is A revoke may be corrected (correct card substituted) without trick penalty before any player of the offending side plays to the next trick; otherwise, it becomes established. If a revoke ...


11

Ducking can be used for multiple purposes (not necessarily all on same hand, of course). Some uses of ducking Entry creation: This IMO is the primary use. Sometimes you duck in your side suit to make sure you have enough entries to establish the suit and cash it. Notice that the primary use of hold-up is to prevent opponents from having entries to cash a ...


11

Well, the proper followup is what you have agreed upon. The 'normal' responses to a transfer allow you to bid the major at the 2 level (usual completion of the transfer) or bid the major at the 3 level, which shows a maximum hand and 4 cards in the major in question (called super-accept). Assuming your agreement is the above, bidding 2NT with doubleton in ...


11

2 sections to my answer: How to get up and running in 20 minutes Next steps to progress from the 20 minute version to solid Bridge beginner How to get up and running in 20 minutes It's simply not possible to play the full game of bridge itself after 20 minutes in a way that satisfies or even makes any sense. However, one can make use of a Gateway game ...


11

Law 20 of The Laws of Duplicate Bridge deals with review and explanation of calls. Quoting partially: F. Explanation of Calls During the auction and before the final pass, any player may request, but only at his own turn to call, an explanation of the opponents’ prior auction. He is entitled to know about calls actually made, about ...


10

I wholly agree with thesun's answer, particularly "you must squeeze every ounce of potential out of your cards". But since you've posed particular queries at the end of your question: Part-scores are the most obvious difference. If you have strong Hearts, but not strong enough for slam, a Rubber player looks at the scoresheet; with 60 points below the ...


10

I've always understood the general rule to be: open with a weaker hand than usual in third seat, but with a stronger hand than usual in fourth seat. As such, no, it seems like probably a bad idea to pre-empt in the fourth seat, for a couple of reasons. It seems to miss the point of pre-empting entirely. Usually, a pre-emptive bid is meant to deprive the ...


10

I understand how duplicate bridge works, but I'm still missing one small conceptual part of the scoring, being the outcome when a deal is passed out. Is the score for that hand just assumed to be 0 for both sides Yes. Why would there be an exception? Passing out the hand is a perfectly valid way to play it. making it identical to a hand that happened to ...


10

Holding AKx Kx QJxxxx Kx, it is unsatisfying and misleading to open 1D and rebid 3D. Most of your values are outside of diamonds and in fact you have decent stopping positions in all other suits. Opening 1NT conveys the hand type and playing strength more accurately.


10

This isn't for the purpose of excluding the player from the game - and typically the player in that seat will physically move the cards requested by the declarer to be played. The idea is that dummy's hand (and only that hand) becomes public information, creating an asymmetry - the declarer knows all 26 cards that will be used to try to make the contract, ...


9

A much more important reason is to allow the responder to describe their hand more fully. A 1NT opening bid describes both shape and point count and so it's usually up to responder to then set the contract - the 1NT opener will typically not bid again. However, responder with points for a 2NT raise and a five card major is in a quandary. Bidding 2NT may mean ...


9

It sounds like you're playing a less formal game, so I don't see a problem with asking the question. In a more formal setting each card would remain in front of the player that played it so the question wouldn't be necessary and most likely an irregularity.


9

Even with the same experts playing North-South, there will be luck involved. For instance When you have a pure guess in a two way finesse for a Q or distribution etc. When you have a guess during bidding (sacrifice or not etc) System wins/losses. When you overbid/underbid/play incorrectly and hit a lucky lie of the cards. Same hand could be played ...


9

It is legitimate, as long you disclose the known tendencies to the opponents. If you don't, it is similar to having undisclosed agreements.


9

What North and South did is not a take out double, but a conventional response to a strong club opening. One of the most important things to do facing a strong club is to intervene, making it more difficult for the opposing side to reach the optimum contract. You don't want you opponents to relay themselves into a hard to bid (grand)slam that no one else ...


9

"It takes 26 points to make a game" is clearly a rule of thumb, not a hard rule. Anyone who has played more than a few hands of Bridge should be able to see that, sometimes, light hands combined with intelligent play make a contract; and, sometimes, a solid point count is brought down by a bad lie of cards or a clever defence. I don't think any of this is ...


9

Evaluating opening leads objectively can be very difficult. In fact, it would be hard to do so without doing an extensive computer simulation in many cases (which in itself, is a hard problem). Of course, there will also be situations where one call tell what a good/poor lead is, without any simulations. To answer your other question, yes there is more ...


9

Your partner's response(s) ought to give you a good idea of whether a no trumps contract is the correct one to pursue, or if you might be better off looking elsewhere. Perhaps your partner will bid Stayman over your NT bid. If you find a satisfactory fit in hearts or spades, then the question of whether you have a shortage somewhere else becomes irrelevant ...


9

Victor Mollo addressed this problem in one of his books (I forget which). His suggestion, if you wished to stop and think at your turn of play, was to place the card you plan to play face down on the table, announcing that you were playing that card, and then do your thinking. Provided your thinks don't take inordinately long, no-one will complain.


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