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22

Playing cards in such a way as to not accurately reflect your hand is perfectly fine - as long as that's actually what you're doing. There are plenty of hands where you're on defense and you know that partner is pretty much worthless; you're defending 3NT, partner knows your long suit, and you have 14 points anyway and expect partner to be in the lead ...


18

Against No Trump the point is to set up tricks that will be guaranteed. Here the KQJT9 is four safe tricks - so you lead from that hoping to later get in with the diamond King. When you do get in, either with a spade from partner or a diamond, you have four tricks guaranteed that will set the contract. By convention, from a run like that you lead the top ...


13

Joe has absolutely correctly answered your question. Let me discuss why this argument is being made. Part of what makes bridge so challenging is that unlike chess, it is a game of incomplete information (another part is that unlike poker, all 52 cards are in play). One of the goals of the bidding and the play is to pass enough information about your hand ...


9

Is it ethical? Sure, and it's done all the time (for real bridge reasons, see Joe's answer). It is not required to help declarer when it won't help partner. What's not ethical is telling the opponents your signalling method, and then having it not be. "We play standard carding" is not the same as "we agreed standard carding but since my ...


8

In pair competitions, yes absolutely ; everything about each hand is identical every time it is played. The dealer and vulnerability is determined by the board number usually - a sixteen board rotation covering all combinations of dealer and vulnerability. The holder has a number and the dealer and vulnerability marked on it. See this picture from wikipedia: ...


8

In matchpoints, your score is based on how many people you got a better score than. Doesn’t matter what the score is - just is it better. So if 10 pairs play a hand, and 8 bid the game; one bids part score; and you: Bid the game: if it makes you get 5 points, if it goes down you get 4 points. Bid the part score: if the game makes you get 0.5 points, if it ...


8

When you bid differently from most of the other players, you increase your variance. Being in a different contract than everyone else makes it more likely you will get a very good score, but also more likely that you will get a very bad score, while reducing your chance of getting an average-ish score. Now, people who listen to bridge advice and read bridge ...


7

With xxx xx Jxxx Jxxx, the decision between 1S and 2C is very close. Any move that makes spades less attractive (eg holding only a doubleton) or clubs more attractive (eg a 5-card suit) breaks the "tie" in favor of 2C. Any of those three hands would be a clear 2C call for me.


7

As a player of uncommon systems (weak NT in a very strong NT environment, Strong Club systems in a standard/2 over 1 world) I agree with Alexander Woo (who likely won't be surprised). However, variance is actually a very interesting topic at matchpoints. Possibly the hardest part of matchpoints is working out what the contract really is when dummy comes ...


6

I expect a lot of this is due to the players not knowing what they, or their opponents, are playing. I don't know if the other players are bots or human, but if bots, the bidding is odd. The SAYC book doesn't talk about balancing much, but it does say about direct overcalls: "Overcalls show 8–16 points (double and bid the long suit with a stronger hand)...


6

I would not be inclined to bid 1S with any of the hands mentioned, nor in most circumstances with a 2-card spade suit. With a minimum hand responding 1S on a three card suit might be better than 2C on four to the jack -- the decision is marginal. But bidding 1S with only 2 spades could easily find you in a 6- or even a 5-card fit, in a very bad place. I ...


6

The ACBL Convention Charts are a list of allowed agreements in the ACBL (but not necessarily other organizations). You would need to determine which convention chart was being used by the particular competition you were involved in. Let's check a few. Please note the following applies to 1H and 1S and not to the minors, which have different rules related ...


6

If you're playing on the Basic Chart (0-"750 or lower" limit game) then you have to be careful. Otherwise you're fine. If you're thinking about opening much lighter than standard in the first two seats, the under-750 games aren't really for you. As others have said, there's nothing regulatory about top of "weak 2" being higher than ...


6

I am not a TD, but I am a qualified Club Director, and this situation is actually a fairly clear one. Under the Laws of Duplicate Bridge , laws 61-64 govern revokes. It is a common misunderstanding that there is no penalty if the dummy revokes. There is no automatic adjustment in such cases, but the Director should attempt to restore equity, and a proper ...


5

Yes, The Rule of 12 is used, except it is the Rule of 10 and 12. Third best is led only from a holding 3 or 4 cards and fifth best is led from holdings of 5 or 6 cards. Opening Leader's partner is expected to apply the result of subtracting from both 10 and 12, with the information available from seeing Dummy and hearing the bidding, to make an appropriate ...


5

This is very system dependent. See this article for example for a long discussion of various options. Standard, everything other than pass or a game jump is forcing. Remember you have 19 and partner has 5-6 at least usually, so you’re probably in a game. I would at least play Gerber here (so 4C is not natural) but 3 level bids are forcing and usually ...


5

For the most part, in Bergen, the opener is the "Captain". Responder does what Opener tells them to, nothing more. This is particularly true here, in the 1S-3S sequence, which is often described as "preemptive" - it describes a weak hand. The way you can tell is how the response is very tailored to provide fairly specific information, ...


5

You ask three or four different things here; and while Mycroft does a good job of discussing the concept, I wanted to directly answer your questions. Are you the "captain"? No, you're not the "captain" necessarily, if you mean the person who ends up deciding where you go. Captaincy largely means one person has a well-described hand, and ...


5

I would never pull a double on that auction, regardless of my hand. "The book of rebids by preempter is 1000 pages long, and they're all blank," as the saying goes. Responder is the captain on this auction, and the double is not cooperative. If I'm not willing to sit this double, I shouldn't have opened. West's double is a bit aggressive, but not ...


5

ruds, of course, is right (my standard spiel here is "one of the next players' options is to accept the call. By bidding, she has taken that option. Please continue.") I want to go through the rest of the story. The One Rule (in my mind, said with capitals) is Law 9B1a: "The Director should be summoned at once when attention is drawn to an ...


5

To elaborate on one particular point only mentioned in passing in the other answers, specifically, entry management: Your nice sequence of high cards in spades that, however, lacks the ace can only be converted into tricks in two stages as at some point the opponents will intervene with their ace. Therefore, you or your partner will have to retake the ...


4

There's a fundamental problem that the rules of bridge are not well-defined for computers. Specifically, the rules require that partnerships communicate their agreements - including implicit agreements arising from experience playing with their partner - to their opponents. No one has really figured out what it means for a computer to communicate its ...


4

Yes, you're right - there is no secret information shared by your partner but not with opponents, beyond the difference in ability of the two partnerships at deciphering the information. When I say "One Heart", everyone at the table knows that I have 12-21 points and 5 or more hearts. Bridge isn't Poker, or any other similar game, where hiding ...


4

This is a (very old fashioned) extreme example, but many systems are designed at least in part to hide information from the defenders. Bids on the left, explanations on the right: 1NT-2D; 12-14 Balanced - Artificial game force 2NT-3C; No 4 card major or 5 card minor - show your shape 3H-4S; exactly 3 spades, 2 hearts, 4=4 in the minors (key!) - to play pass ...


4

Let's look at the relevant Bridge Laws. Law 16B1 says: Any extraneous information from partner that might suggest a call or play is unauthorized.This includes remarks, questions, replies to questions, unexpected alerts or failures to alert, unmistakable hesitation, unwonted speed, special emphasis, tone, gesture, movement or mannerism. (a) A player may not ...


4

Two points not raised by the other answers are: What's happening on the hand? Where are we headed? When partner Doubles 1H with our bust and 3-small Spade holding, expectation is that Partner is either: Holding 4 Spade cards and short Hearts, investigating our ability to compete, and will either pass or raise 1S depending on strength; A bit stronger ...


4

The only time I have played 3M Bergen raise as wide as 0-9 was when I played it in a Precision shell, but even then, it was "no interest in game opposite a maximum" (just that the maximum was 15, not 21, HCP)[1]. As others are saying, traditionally 1M-3M is 0-bad 6. And the message being passed is "we don't have game given you didn't open 2C&...


4

This Aces on Bridge shows a good example of this. Look in the "Bid with the Aces" section. What this describes is an auction where you're exploring NT, and trying to figure out if you're comfortable with coverage in all four suits. If you have an auction like: N E S W 1C - 1H - 1S - 1NT - 2D - ? - 2D there would be "asking" for ...


4

Third seat definitely can take liberties (both weak and strong). You don't have to worry about missing game, and you can preempt on hands that you never would if partner could need to judge how the hands fit for game. You can open with "a reason", and expect not to be hanged for it. However, those liberties have to be the focus of agreements, and ...


4

Assuming no psych bid: South has a balanced hand with 12+ to 14 HCP presumed to include Spade AKQ for his 4-card holding. That leaves very little room for additional values in his hand. With a presumed (23) or (33) holding in the minors the likely reason to have not opened one of those, planning a rebid in NT, is that they are both bare of high cards. It's ...


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