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16 votes
Accepted

Why might an auction go 1NT-3NT?

I want to co-sign Tomek Czajka's answer and expand upon it a bit. The reason the auction goes 1NT-3NT is that it maximizes your expected score. As a general rule, to make game in no trump with two ...
ruds's user avatar
  • 6,438
13 votes

Why might an auction go 1NT-3NT?

Other bids are reserved for other hands. For example, if you respond 2NT, you're indicating 8-9 HCP rather than 12 HCP. By bidding 3NT directly, you're giving information that you don't have those ...
Tomek Czajka's user avatar
10 votes

Do good bridge players open one diamond and rebid two clubs when they are "weak?"

I think your second bid should be 2D. A rebid of 2N should promise an invitational hand, and I don't think that hand qualifies, particularly since you have a misfit (and hence partner's 5th diamond ...
Alexander Woo's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Theoretically Optimal Bridge System (In the mathematical sense)

The reason this is unanswerable is that the optimum bidding system - from a single partnership perspective - is to bid more destructively than your opponents can or will choose to do. Just look at the ...
Forget I was ever here's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Is it OK to refrain from exploring further at matchpoints when you are in a satisfactory contract?

When opening light in fourth seat, the goal is simply to get a positive score. Any positive score. Some partnerships will lose control and get too high; others will decline to open. Your decisions ...
Forget I was ever here's user avatar
6 votes

Why might an auction go 1NT-3NT?

The point count for the opening 1NT depends on the bidding system. In Standard American, it can be 15-17 or 16-18. In Acol, a weak no trump with 12-14 is common. Assuming you're playing one of the ...
AlDante's user avatar
  • 354
5 votes

What does it mean when the laws say that a forcing 1NT response cannot guarantee invitational values?

You are referring not to the laws, but to the ACBL's convention charts, which govern the conventions that are legal to play in ACBL-sanctioned events. In the Basic chart, which is designed for events ...
ruds's user avatar
  • 6,438
5 votes

Do good bridge players open one diamond and rebid two clubs when they are "weak?"

In addition to what @Alexander Woo says, I disagree that the 5=5 minor hand should rebid a "limiting" (not "signoff". You're unlimited) 1NT. Treatments (and system continuations) ...
Mycroft's user avatar
  • 2,963
4 votes

Under what circumstances might some modern experts bid no trump with "offshape" hands?

Many experts now open 1N on almost all hands that are 5422 with 5 in a minor, 6322 with 6 in a minor, or 5332 with 5 in any suit, and also "in range". The primary reason is that, even ...
Alexander Woo's user avatar
4 votes

Partner opens 1NT (15-17 HCP) and then your RHO intervenes

This is what I would expect to agree with an advanced player at the partnership desk given that we have only a few minutes to discuss all of our agreements and want to stick with what I would expect ...
Alexander Woo's user avatar
4 votes

1 Spade Interference over Precision 1 Club

Such a convention may be legal in some parts of the world (Europe is more permissive than ACBL). But, I have never heard it played here in Finland (and we are quite permissive with conventions unless ...
Jyrki Lahtonen's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

1 Spade Interference over Precision 1 Club

This treatment is illegal in the ACBL. It falls under the definition of a "Purely Destructive Initial Action": "Purely Destructive Initial Action”: An opening bid or an overcall that ...
ruds's user avatar
  • 6,438
4 votes

How strong a suit do you need to impose a (minor) suit on a partner bidding Michaels?

Your partner has advertised that they are two suited. The only reason to bid your own suit is that you can play your suit across from a void and that your best fit in one of their suits would be a ...
ruds's user avatar
  • 6,438
4 votes

Why might an auction go 1NT-3NT?

Because neither player is interested in anything else Given that, why doesn't partner raise by a smaller amount, taking advantage of the bidding room to communicate their hand more clearly with ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar
4 votes

Where would modern bridge players draw the line in the following paradigm?

Two statements here, before it goes into the weeds: One of my rules (which nobody I trust disagrees with) is "Once you have decided your hand is an X, it remains an X no matter what happens. It ...
Mycroft's user avatar
  • 2,963
4 votes

Should bidders take "controls"into account when trying to bid a no trump slam?

Of course you should be concerned about controls. If you don't have control of all suits, and first round control of three, you're not making 6. Control count is a good way to determine this, if your ...
Mycroft's user avatar
  • 2,963
3 votes

Why is the rationale for requiring a minimum 5-4 distribution for an "unusual" 2NT overcall?

The convention chart document that you were reading is in no way a suggestion of how conventions should be played, or even necessarily a description of conventions that are actually played. Instead, ...
ruds's user avatar
  • 6,438
3 votes

When should someone make a minimum bid over a takeout double with 8 or more high card points?

I have too much strength to underbid as much as suggested. The first hand has two aces. We may easily belong in 3NT, playing against a single opponent and those aces mean that we have the entries to ...
Jyrki Lahtonen's user avatar
3 votes

At what point (if at all) does the "captaincy" revert to a 1NT opener?

I'm not sure that it's so important to know "who is the captain" in those situations. It seems like getting hung up on semantics instead of focusing on your responsibilities and options in ...
ruds's user avatar
  • 6,438
3 votes

Ethical issue about duplicate bridge

When you play against the robots, a complete record of your play is kept. You can look it over afterwards, and ask anyone else to. It would indeed be unethical to have someone advise you as you are ...
Alexander Woo's user avatar
3 votes

Opening light in the 3rd position

My feeling is that, in expert play, you should open in 3rd seat if you'd be willing to overcall, OR if you'd be willing to open in 1st seat. (Of course, sometimes you make 4 card overcalls. ...
Alexander Woo's user avatar
3 votes

How should I have dealt with the Capelleti interference to my partner's 1NT bid

You and your partners should adopt the following agreement: After a 1 notrump opening and interference in the direct seat of 2 clubs: Double is your normal Stayman 2 club call; and Everything else is ...
Forget I was ever here's user avatar
2 votes

Was I wrong to open with a singleton lead in this situation?

There is an adage, that when you have long trumps you should lead your side's longest suit. The objective being, that you can force declarer to use up enough trumps ruffing your long suit and they ...
postrationalist's user avatar
2 votes

Is it legitimate/ethical to treat the same bid from different people in different ways?

On a practical note, When you adjust your bidding to compensate for your partner, you'll tend to encourage them to adopt an even more aggressive or conservative stance in their bidding over time, so ...
postrationalist's user avatar
2 votes

Is it ok to open a "weak two" with a decent six of a suit and a "weak" four card side major?

This is up to you and your partner. Partnerships - including world-class partnerships - have different agreements about this. Note your agreements about what is allowed for a weak 2 not only affect ...
Alexander Woo's user avatar
2 votes

Can you use Stayman (or other means) to rescue an inadequately protected 2NT bid?

Realistically, the right sequence there is going to put you in 3NT, and you’ll make nearly every time. Yes, you’ll have weird situations where everything is against you as this was; but so many more ...
Joe's user avatar
  • 4,202
2 votes

Is it OK to refrain from exploring further at matchpoints when you are in a satisfactory contract?

He claimed that if he had four, we would have gotten a better score by making two spades instead of one heart Err, OK. But so what? "IF" is a big word here. What if he had no spades? Or ...
Peter Flom's user avatar
2 votes

When should someone make a minimum bid over a takeout double with 8 or more high card points?

On the first hand: I've got three high card tricks on the first three tricks of two (likely) flat suits. That's always worth 9 points, so no re-evaluation ever pushes me below that. Vulnerable vs Not ...
Forget I was ever here's user avatar
2 votes

When should someone make a minimum bid over a takeout double with 8 or more high card points?

Not sure about seven, but the big concern in the earlier question was the 4-3-3-3 opposite a takeout double. Two flat hands and no more than 7 card fit likely plus the AQJ in diamonds being so ...
Joe's user avatar
  • 4,202
2 votes

Should there be different standards for a strong two club bid depending on the expected rebid?

The answer to your headline question is yes, but the reasoning and some of the specific recommendations in the text of your question are a bit off. First, for NT. The table you linked to recommends ...
ruds's user avatar
  • 6,438

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