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20

Playing cards in such a way as to not accurately reflect your hand is perfectly fine - as long as that's actually what you're doing. There are plenty of hands where you're on defense and you know that partner is pretty much worthless; you're defending 3NT, partner knows your long suit, and you have 14 points anyway and expect partner to be in the lead ...


8

Other than the pedantic answer (any time Declarer can't possibly make), there are plenty of times that it doesn't have the impact you're suggesting. First off, there are a lot of ways you can end up in a doubled contract. You might make a negative double and then your partner passes to convert to penalty, for example. That gives declarer some information, ...


8

Is it ethical? Sure, and it's done all the time (for real bridge reasons, see Joe's answer). It is not required to help declarer when it won't help partner. What's not ethical is telling the opponents your signalling method, and then having it not be. "We play standard carding" is not the same as "we agreed standard carding but since my ...


6

It's not even particularly close - just open 1C. In 4th seat the overriding consideration is the ability to make a plus score, and the use of Pierson Points to make that evaluation is widely regarded as the best (to date) means of assessing that prospect. Here you have 12 HCP with 2.5 QT, well placed J and T, and another good spot card (albeit unsupported) ...


6

Playing 2-over-1 with a few conventions (including the serious 3nt), my auction would be something like 1d 1s 2c (this is a bit conservative but I think the right call) 2h (artificial game force) 2s (showing three cards in spades) 3s (setting trumps, showing a hand that is not bad for slam. A hand with poor controls would bid 4s, ending the auction) 3 nt (...


5

Alexander Woo's answer well addresses the direct question at issue - but there are numerous statements made (and implied) in the question body which are based on misunderstanding at best. Let's take them one by one: Most contracts can succeed with some distributions and defenses of the 26 opposing cards, and fail with others. No, there is no basis for ...


5

Bidding systems, particularly ones experts use against experts, are built around optimizing results overall, not contracts. Half the time, the opponents have better hands than you do, and you are still trying to make their results as bad as possible. Sometimes this is by sacrificing - getting to a contract that goes down but for which the opponents score ...


5

You have underbid this hand by about 8 points. This hand should not only be opened 1D, it can seriously consider a jump rebid of 3D showing 16+ total points. Courtenay would count it as a five-loser hand, two tricks better than an opening bid at seven losers. You may not have any aces - just a 1/2 point deduction - but you have tremendous shape, working ...


5

First: I'm speaking sanctioned duplicate bridge. What happens in the rubber clubs is out of my experience; the Laws are different, and obviously when money is on the line, different things are ethical or unethical. To answer your title: yes. Because the ethics of the game are fully defined by the Proprieties (which were moved from "guidelines" to actual ...


5

The smaller amount of information in Spades means it is hard to purposefully start a finesse, but you can still easily continue one if it is started by accident. For example, your partner happens to lead small and first opponent plays small, and you are holding the AQ. You can now play the Q and hope that the K is not in the remaining opponent's hand. In ...


5

I expect a lot of this is due to the players not knowing what they, or their opponents, are playing. I don't know if the other players are bots or human, but if bots, the bidding is odd. The SAYC book doesn't talk about balancing much, but it does say about direct overcalls: "Overcalls show 8–16 points (double and bid the long suit with a stronger hand)...


4

I'd rather bid 1d there, not 2d. I think it's as likely you have game as they do; unlikely in either case, really. But you're discounting your partner having, first seat, something like ten points and a five card spade suit. That's 4S in the bag, if the points are useful ones (not wasted QH or whatnot). 6-7 spade tricks, a few in diamonds and clubs, and ...


4

Absolutely! I believe Deep Finesse (100% free according to the web site) is the double dummy analyzer used by the A.C.B.L. for modern tournament to determine par scores on hand records. That would likely be your best choice for play analysis. Yes, a double dummy analyzer is, to the best of my knowledge and understanding, the best technology available for ...


4

Absolutely! This type of disruptive behaviour is in no way acceptable by any player. The Laws of Duplicate Bridge (2017) provide mechanisms under which the Director can act in such a circumstance of disruptive play. LAW 90 - PROCEDURAL PENALTIES A. Director’s Authority The Director, in addition to implementing the rectifications in these Laws, ...


4

Playing any natural system, or any system where the opening of 3 Spades or 4 Spades is played as natural, I would open 3 Spades Vulnerable and 4 Spades Not Vulnerable. Some may prefer to open just 3 Spades in both vulnerabilities, but that is likely more a matter of partnership style and agreement. This should be discussed with partner, as some partnerships ...


4

As I understand things these methods originated in Italy. Many Italian experts play that the double shows 4 or 5 spades and hands with 6+ spades start with 2H. I've tried this in a few partnerships but don't yet have enough experience with it to say how well it works. The partnership does need to agree on followups over 2H since it has a wide range - most ...


4

Certainly, you can. Whether it's at all useful is another question, as others have been saying. The ACBL has formulas for handicapping pairs and teams (based on Masterpoint total; there is another method available for handicap based on previous results, which works well in an insular environment like a club). The grotty details are exactly that, but the ...


3

No - presuming you mean during the hand after the call has been made. OP makes no mention as to whether this is Rubber or Duplicate Bridge. However, there is great conformity between the two sets of Laws, so I will briefly outline the structure as defined in the Rubber Bridge Laws, and allow the Director of any relevant Duplicate Game to cover any ...


3

Absolutely. While the South hand has 11 HCP it should deduct one for the 4333 distribution. That's just a given. After that the spots are good but the Q is in the wrong suit - it will usually help the hand much more in Spades than in in Clubs. That's a wash so call it 10 Points even. With this flat 10 and partner denying a 15-17 balanced hand or 4 spades ...


3

Bridge Base Online allows you to play against AI, just create a table with all robots and then replace N with your partner. See for example this forum question.


3

Larry's advice is for when the card you play is winning the trick. When you're playing an honor that is lower than some other honor already played to the trick, play the top of touching honors. This isn't an attitude signal (ie echo). This is communicating the honor layout of the suit. Never* play an honor under a high honor unless you have the touching ...


3

Let's talk capabilities first. In general, Grand Slam should not be bid unless one can identify all 13 tricks expected to be made. If North is making the final 6/7 decision in Spades after a Blackwood auction then only 12 tricks can be counted unless the Diamond J is somehow located: 5 Spades; 3 high Diamonds; fifth diamond after one ruff; and A,A,K in ...


3

The score varies by game variant: Playing Rubber Bridge: Above the line - Insult: 50 Below the line - Trick Score of: 120 as 3 * 40 The trick score for the deal equals or exceeds 100, so a game has been bid and made. If this game is the second by the same partnership of the rubber, an additional Rubber Bonus of either 500 or 700 would be scored above the ...


3

If your partner knows your psyching tendencies, then they have become an implicit agreement that has to be disclosed to your opponents. If, in certain situations, your psychs are frequent enough that partner starts worrying about it, he or she should alert the bid and say "Frequently a psych" or something similar. (In some bridge jurisdictions, bidding ...


3

My local club occasionally hosts a handicap duplicate game, in which weaker pairs are spotted a few matchpoints to start. I don't play rubber bridge, but I would imagine that you could start by spotting points as you suggest. Alternatively, you could give odds - the weaker pair might have to pay a penny a point while the stronger pair pays a nickel, for ...


3

Probably most experts these days open 1NT with a balanced hand with a 5 card major in their NT range (whatever that is). Many of them play conventions that allow their partner to ask if they have a 5-card major; probably the most common is for 3C to ask for a 5 card major, but some roll it into their 2C responses or use some other bid. A few people still ...


3

I'm assuming some form of Standard American/French/German with 5 card majors and strong NT. Playing the most common form of inverted minors: With <10 points, 1N (but I would consider a tactical 3D with S:x H:xxx D:KQxx C:xxxxx) With 10+ points(*), 2D with diamonds and a small doubleton or singleton in a major, and usually NT otherwise(**). Not playing ...


3

This does depend on the scoring method somewhat as well as the cards, but "almost never". Hamman's rule: "If you have a choice of reasonable bids and one of them is 3NT, then bid it." You never want to play 5m instead of 3NT. Sometimes you have to, however. It should be obvious from your hand (though less so after a strong NT opener, ...


2

In Duplicate Bridge (contract Bridge) the most commonly played bridge. 3 Clubs Vulnerable (red zone): 670 (40+40+40+500+50p) Not Vulnerable (green zone): 470 (40+40+40+300+50p) World Bridge Federation The Laws of Duplicate Bridge 2017 LAW 77 – DUPLICATE BRIDGE SCORING TABLE (Page 57) ... Clubs 40p For making each Doubled odd trick bid... ... ...


2

Yes, your 2H call was an overbid. Your 2H call is showing values for a Game Invitation, and despite your nice shape you have misfit concerns, weak spots, no aces, two doubletons, and that ugly Club tripleton with no spots. Better to limit your values right away, so Partner doesn't get excited if you compete aggressively in Hearts. It is right to compete ...


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