New answers tagged

2

Echoing the above with regard to not needing a 6-card suit. Wrongsiding a NT contract is usually worse than wrongsiding a hearts contract, so I think it's best to avoid responder making a 2NT response unless you want to get fancy. If you want to keep things simple but effective, popular in clubs in North America is to have 2D be "semipositive", ...


3

David Siegel has the laws almost right (and thank you for that!) He didn't mention that there is also no automatic trick penalty for the second revoke in the same suit (even if it wasn't from dummy), 64B2: "it is a subsequent revoke in the same suit by the same player, the first revoke having been established." But either 64B exception works for ...


1

On the hand as given, declarer should draw trumps (ending in South) after getting in with a diamond ruff at trick three, and only then attack clubs. You could call this part of a SWOT analysis, as the possibility of a defense club ruff is a threat here, and there is no benefit to risking it. Then the club A followed by the Jack gives the slight extra chance ...


6

I am not a TD, but I am a qualified Club Director, and this situation is actually a fairly clear one. Under the Laws of Duplicate Bridge , laws 61-64 govern revokes. It is a common misunderstanding that there is no penalty if the dummy revokes. There is no automatic adjustment in such cases, but the Director should attempt to restore equity, and a proper ...


1

An interesting situation. I'm not a bridge lawyer, but a bit of seaching pointed me to this source. The director should not apply the Revoke Laws. The defenders, however, may well be due an adjustment. This is in line with my common sense. It is not a revoke, but the defenders have been damaged. Even though they, too, had a chance to count that the dummy ...


-1

This is very much a matter of partnership agreement. Some people hold to the definition of "No voids or singletons, no more than one doubleton" for a hand balanced enough to open 1NT. Some prefer "no suit weaker than Qx" instead or in addition. Some will open with a singleton A or K, or even a singleton Q. The ACBL's Standard American ...


2

Something I wrote on Another Site, but it's still relevant, and contains some information not in the current answers: "If it looks like a balanced 15-17, open 1NT". That's the modern guideline. All of the caveats of the past: need stoppers in 3, preferably all 4 suits; need 2.5 QT; 4333, 4432 or 5m332 only; no small doubleton; and the rest have ...


2

I have never heard that phrase for the concept, but it's a very valid one. The version I hear is "two suits shows, one suit asks". That is, if there are two suits your side are concerned about (stoppers for NT), you bid the one you have (and NT with both, of course); with only one suit of concern, if you bid it, you're asking for one (because you'...


4

This Aces on Bridge shows a good example of this. Look in the "Bid with the Aces" section. What this describes is an auction where you're exploring NT, and trying to figure out if you're comfortable with coverage in all four suits. If you have an auction like: N E S W 1C - 1H - 1S - 1NT - 2D - ? - 2D there would be "asking" for ...


1

The outstanding Spades are QJT9 in West's hand, West having already played the 8 and K to East's (original) doubleton A2. Assuming OP hasn't misled on describing the Spade spots, the Heart Q is absolutely marked in the West hand - doubleton or singleton - by the failure of West to lead a (setting) third round of Spades at trick 4. After winning Trick 2 with ...


0

I agree with the assessment made in the article, if you assume this is aimed at beginners. Advanced players would consider E's lack of bid as more significant, and not W's choice of bid. West has the following hand: Suit Cards S KQJTx(x) H (Q?)x(x) D xx(x) C A(J?)x Or something close to that (could have Q stiff hearts and 4 diamonds, etc.) So the ...


1

On further consideration, while E might hold the H Q, East cannot hold the H Qxx or better, because then East would have responded to 1S, probably with 1NT. Therefore the finesse is either hopeless or pointless, because if East has the QH singleton or doubleton it will drop. Playing for the drop is still the better play, although it will fail if west has the ...


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