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3

Deckbuilding is part of playing a CCG. Playing a game of Magic with a deck you had no control over is like playing a round of Bridge where someone else did the bidding for you. Any proposal for playing a duplicate CCG involves at some point playing a deck assigned to you by the format, created either by your opponent or by the competition's hosts. And that'...


3

Not sure this is an answer, but it certainly isn't a comment. Sentences in [brackets] are ignorable side-notes. In team-of-four bridge events, including the world championships, the two tables in the match are set up so that each team puts one pair N-S at their "home" table and E-W at the other team's home table. Then the same hands (6 is a "...


2

One of the things that makes duplicate bridge work is that, once the cards are dealt, the random factors are mostly fixed. The decisions people make in the middle of the game don't tend to change which unknown random factors are important and which are largely irrelevant. No matter what decisions people make throughout the bidding and play of a hand, if ...


1

First, duplicate bridge is played in teams of two because bridge itself is played in teams of 2. It is a feature of the game, not the duplicate tournament style, so there is not necessarily a reason to have teams of two here. In addition, the tournament setup described here does not really reflect duplicate bridge: in duplicate bridge, in different rounds ...


1

Duplicate bridge exists because bridge is a highly random game - if you don’t, then the deal determines who wins far more than the play. The deal is zero sum - opponents rarely have evenly matched hands. TCGs are totally different: each player makes their own deck, and they’re positive sum - both decks can have the best cards (equally). That’s most of the ...


5

I would strongly suggest, if you are interested in this, or the arguments on the site you're getting the other questions from, that you find a second-hand copy of Watson's The play of the hand at bridge, and read until your mind explodes (it will. Even if you're an experienced bridge player, it ramps from "an Ace is higher than a King" to compound ...


5

When selecting an opening lead, there are two decisions that you must make. First, which suit should you lead? Second, which card should you lead from that suit? Most of the "rules" about leading address the second question. "Fourth highest from your longest and strongest" addresses both. It's an easy rule to remember, and it's usually ...


9

Fourth highest is from a suit with no sequence - four small, or one honor and three small, that sort of thing. It’s a good lead, it gives you some chance to promote one or more of the small to a trick. However, when you have a se quence it’s important to lead from that sequence for two reasons. First, you may give up a trick if you don’t - in the absurd ...


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