38

I found this rule very quickly in the rules. In the rare circumstance where a drawn tile has no legal placement (and all players agree), the player discards the tile from the game (into the box) and draws another tile to place For example:


37

A city in Carcassonne is completed when their are no places you can possibly add any additional tiles to grow that city. Three Cities, A, B, & C. Three Tiles that can be laid down (1,2, & 3) in the Green Square.. So in this first picture; only city "B" is completed (3 tiles); as you cannot add any more tiles to that specific city; city A &...


21

Basic Rules: On your turn you place a tile. After placing the tile you can place your meeple onto any uncontrolled feature on that tile. After placing meeples, all completed features are scored. Assuming that you are trying to gain some control of a controlled city Let's assume the situation is this: In the situation that you have presented you have ...


17

A city is completed when it has a fully connected border and the area within that border is completely filled. If the tiles that form the city have other city pieces, then as long as those pieces aren't part of the city then the city is still completed. One way to think of it is to imagine that you're working in MS Paint. If you drew the borders of the city ...


14

That is my understanding of the rules. You could still score 8 points if you previously placed thieves on three of the road segments leading into the tile of course.


14

Yes, depending on how many players there are and what expansions are being played, the game will sometimes end with one or more players having played one tile less. Furthermore, some tiles can become discarded. At times, early on in the game, a four sided city tile has no where to go and thus has to be discarded; the player draws again, and upsets the tile ...


14

You could do, the game would work perfectly well without farmers. I would argue against it because this still leaves the new players in a position where they don't see farms being used and don't see how they can score highly if placed well despite the long-term sacrifice of a piece. In my experience with teaching Carcassonne, players tend to go very ...


14

According to the rules: Each field is worth 3 points per adjacent completed city. So the city must share a line with the field. It does this for three of the cities. The small vertical city is adjacent to two fields which does not connect to the field with the red meeple, so this one does not count.


13

Note: This answer below is using 1st Edition scoring rules (Cities only scored once). Although parts of the analysis are valuable to calculating the highest score possible (36 Scoring opportunities, try to score with Meeples that have a high point value per the 36 turns, the highest score of 278 is not correct. I will have to do further analysis to determine ...


13

You can only place it on the tile you just placed. From the Rio Grande edition rules: After the player places a land tile, he may deploy one of his followers, using the following rules: The player may only play 1 follower on a turn. The player must take it from his supply. The player may only deploy it to the tile he just placed. While the ...


12

As mentioned in the comments, I think the U-turns of the river in your example board are invalid; see (this version of) the rules. If, as you say "We must also exclude possibilities that become unplayable when the river curves in onto itself.", the Java program at the bottom will calculate all possible boards, with the caveat that it distinguishes between ...


11

If you're playing with the River (or the River II) don't play with the start tile from the basic game - it has a different coloured back and so will stand out during the tile draw.


11

At any time when the builder is on the table, it functions as documented in the rules. The number of builders in a single city does not affect the way in which each builder functions. Nor does the number of knights. Only the active player gets an extra play if he/she extends the road or city. A builder can be deployed even if there are thieves, knights, or ...


11

No, that's just scenery. The inns all have lakes next to them. This copy of the rules appears to be for the new edition (it says ©2002, 2015 and it doesn't look quite like my copy of the original edition) and the inns all have an obvious lake right next to them. For example:


10

It sounds like you are pretty new to Carcassonne. It's pretty easy to start playing and have your group think that nearly everything should be finished and the board should look nearly square at the end without many blank holes in the grid. If this sounds familiar, then yes, there are likely to be big farms and its a good idea to get in early on the farm. ...


10

I prefer the new rules for the simple reason that farmer scoring always used to be a huge headache. Doing it pasture by pasture, with the ability to simply empty the pasture of farmers once it's been scored, seems like a great timesaver. It also feels good that pasture rules have fallen pretty much exactly in line with city-scoring rules. When I found ...


10

Their primary purpose of bridges is to be able to play a tile that you normally could not because of a road. You have more options to finish a construction, sabotaging with roads/farms becomes significantly harder. Second, bridges strongly affect farms. As Nick already pointed out, farms turn out to be massively larger. It's not at all uncommon to have a ...


9

As Hackworth notes, testing all possible layouts is obviously infeasible. However, it might be possible to get a decent upper bound on the points. I think we can safely assume that meeples will not be a scarce resource when playing in this way (since we can choose to complete the map in any order, it should not be difficult to ensure we always have meeples ...


9

From the Carcassonne FAQ: Q: I have memorised all the tiles. Am I allowed to play a tile when I know that by doing so I am creating a space which can never be filled, either because the required tile doesn't exist or because all the possible tiles have already been played? A: Yes, that is permitted. But be aware that, if by doing so, you have ...


8

Is there an optimal way of placing the tiles in order to maximize one player's score? Yes With a finite amount of tiles, a finite number of legal placements for any tile at any point in the game, and a finite amount of meeple plays after placing a tile, it should be obvious that there are a finite number of possible games. Every game has a definite result ...


8

No points are scored. From the Carcassonne Annotated Rules p58 (note 161) Question: Blue has a mayor in a city with no pennants. Does the city count as occupied? And if so, when the city is scored, will blue score points? Answer: The city is occupied. The mayor has no ‘strength’, so he counts as if there is no follower, and scores no points.


8

The list of expansions that add pieces for each player are as follows: Base game 7 meeples, plus one for scoring. Inns & Cathedrals Adds the Big Meeple. Traders & Builders Adds the Builder and the Pig. Abbey & Mayor Adds the Mayor, the Barn, and the Wagon. Bridges, Castles, and Bazaars Adds 2-3 bridges and 2-3 castles, depending on the ...


8

A couple points of advice here - 1) One easy way to teach the farm mechanic is to run through a sample game of perhaps 5 turns. Make sure to drop a farmer or two during this sample and at the end go through the scoring process. This will get you to the "aha" moment that people have about farmers much more quickly. 2) the game can certainly work without ...


8

It seems like the rules have changed since we bought our copies of Carcassonne. Two-tile cities are now worth two points per tile (four points total) like any other city. I have an old copy published by Rio Grande. In its rules, the following exception is found: Exception: a 2 tile city does not get 2 points per tile A newer copy of the rules (dated ...


7

I think the answer to this question really depends on the state of the board. Generally, if there are large farms with lots of smaller cities, then of course you should shift towards laying down farmers early and claim farming territory. But if there are a few large, unfinished cities which look hopeless, or lots of little farms broken by many roads, ...


7

Besides the scoring differences listed, there is also the "youngest player" goes first rule in 1st. Edition. For a list of all differences between editions, see this excellent annotated rules list and FAQ that covers the Basic Game and 11 expansions.


7

The Mayor's ability allows him to count as more than one follower. So at the end of the game, an unfinished city is scored as normal - compare the Mayor's effective follower number with that of any other player present in the city. The player(s) with the most followers each score one point per city tile, and one point for each pennant. The only special case ...


7

I accept the answer, but doing a little bit research, I found in the Complete Annotated Rules the following: The original starting tile can either be mixed into the stack of river tiles, or placed as soon as the river has been completed, and is treated like a normal tile. And an additional house rule: Mix the original starting tile (without a river) ...


7

To answer the first half of the question: Which of the three road pieces would be considered valid placements for the meeple? (cited from the Complete Annotated Rules ver 7.4 pages 142-143 available here) Alternatively, the player may place a follower as a flier on a flying machine symbol to get the follower in the game.[378][379] The flying ...


7

Short and simple answer: The mayor cannot be placed in a castle. (From footnote 161 in the Carcassonne Complete Annotated Rules) If the mayor is in a city that is turned into a castle, you won't get any points from the mayor as there are no banners in a castle. In that case, the mayor will not be returned to you until the castle is scored (that is to say, ...


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