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6

You are doing the math correctly. Start out with $100. Get 1% cash back, so essentially you have $101. Now, 99.54% RTP, gets you 0.9954 * 101 = $100.54 So, on average every $100 you play, you would make 54 cents. (It's far more likely that RTP is closer to 99%, in which case, the result is $99.99, but let's say it's really 99.54%) According to an article ...


5

I think winning an excessive number of times get you thrown out of a casino. And the casino will then try to find "good" reasons like card counting or whatever dodgy moves you made. If splitting tens is one of them, and you placed a high bet and you won a lot, then certainly the casino will use that to support their claim. If you just split tens and then ...


4

From Wikipedia: $2.50 chips are mostly used for blackjacktables, since a "natural" (a 21 on the first two cards dealt to a player) typically pays 3:2 and most wagers are in increments of $5. However, the Tropicana Casino and Borgatain Atlantic City, New Jersey, and others, have used $2.50 (pink) chips in $7.50 to $15 and $10 to $20 poker games. They have ...


4

If you play table games like blackjack, I don't think you'd have any trouble (although since only a card counter would want to know other people's cards, don't expect any help there. ;)). In Hold-'em poker, some seats are definitely better than others; the cards generally go right in front of the dealer, so if you can get the seat directly in front of the ...


4

The answer to this is most likely no since a casino wants players to maximize their bets and placing any kind of limit that would keep a player betting lower would not be in their best interests. Minimum and Maximum bets at a table are established to maximize the amount that a casino can win while limiting a player to take advantage of long term odds to win ...


4

Casinos are much like any other business; if they want, they can tell you that you are no longer welcome for any reason, or no reason at all. There are some exceptions, primarily the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which prevents "places of public accomodation" (basically any property that welcomes the average Joe coming in off the street) from refusing service ...


3

Like other executives, dealers, pit bosses, and "floor (wo)men" in casinos are concerned about "career risk." This could occur if they lose too much money to the "public" for the casino. Hence the concern about card counters, who will "make money" off the casino (or at least have a positive "expectation.") In the example of the person who drew a three to 18 ...


3

I don't know how American casinos handle this, but in Austria there is the same problem with euros. There is no 0,5 euro chip, so you simply get a regular 50 cent coin.


3

When dealing blackjack, a (legally mandated) rule required all scores to be announced, partly for this exact reason. You would hear the current total for the current active hand, which the dealer would also be pointing to, and can ask for the dealer's card to be stated at any time. A busy table might lead to impatience with constantly calling out all cards ...


3

It's been generally true, but particularly since the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act in 1990, that casinos will make "reasonable efforts" to accommodate the disabled. This is perhaps more true in the East Coast, which had a strong civil rights tradition going back to the 1970s (New Jersey casinos can't bar suspected "card counters" but they ...


2

This question seems to be answered in the comments: @AdamP I had trouble finding your reference but Faro or Pharaoh seems to be close.


1

A google image search will find the various different layouts including a triple zero layout. This wheel was 0 and 00 adjacent. the page I found it on Says it in a casino in Australia. If you search for 'triple zero roulette' You will find many images of that layout as well and casinos that use them.


1

I've been to casinos in Las Vegas and Wisconsin and I think they have all had 50-cent chips at the blackjack table. If they don't, you can work around the problem by betting an even amount. For example, playing 6 dollars a hand at a table with a 5-dollar minimum won't have a significant impact on how much you win or lose.


1

It really depends. I've seen some casinos pay 7.50 with a 5, two 1s and a half-dollar coin, I've even seen casinos that actually had a $2.50 chip. These were all in California.


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