48

Count the cards in the supply In Settlers of Catan you are always allowed to count the number of resources left in the supply decks. It is a perfectly legal move to count the deck before using the monopoly on a resource. This also means that after you got the resources you can just check how many you have in your hand, and how many are left in the deck. ...


26

According to the very old rules from the beginning of munchkin you could cheat if the other players didn't catch you. Likewise, you may also use only one headgear, one suit of armor, one pair of footgear, and two “hand” items (or one “two hands” item), unless you have a card that lets you cheat or the other players don’t catch you. That was in an earlier ...


13

In theory, yes (the macro nature of the dice and the table overcoming any quantum-level randomness, leaving you with classical physics). In practice, the bulk of the evidence says no, that the chaos in the system is greater than human skill can overcome, but some people claim such a special skill. See the short wiki article for (the scant) details. In ...


12

This is a very difficult question to answer, and it's probably the reason that persistent, player power modifying changes are not included in most card games. one possible solution is a central online data store/mobile app This may be beyond your project, but one solution would be to implement some form of website wherein player profiles can be stored, ...


12

Make it so that it doesn't matter if players have faked their profile. Say having a high ranked profile means that you have access to better equipment (and therefore an incentive to produce a fake profile). You could reduce the impact of this by (say) introducing a handicap for high ranked players when playing against lower ranked players. If there is a ...


11

The rules simply say that you cannot have marked cards, without enumerating all the specific ways they might be marked. From section 3.11 of the tournament rules: A card or sleeve is considered marked if it bears something that makes it possible to identify the card without seeing its face, including scratches, discoloration, and bends. So if someone is ...


10

This is all about your social contract1 - some groups play to win, in which case the behaviour you've described seems perfectly reasonable. Other groups play more for fun, and fun can often be reduced if one player is significantly better at the game than everyone else. I'd wouldn't go so far as to call it "cheating" as you didn't break any of the ...


10

You simply need a mechanic that makes it impossible for a player to see the other players' token counts until they are all simultaneously revealed. There are quite a few ways to do this, so you have the freedom to choose something that fits with the theme of your game. Many games (ex: Robo Rally, The Resistance) use cards for this mechanic. It is one of ...


7

In my group we always employ the 'Shenanigans' rule. I have a couple of 'creative' players and though they may swear they are not cheating, they may be doing it inadvertently or from sheer ignorance (or they may be untruthful). Thus the birth of the 'Shenanigans' house rule set. We add one rule to cover all cheating that is detrimental enough that if ...


5

As others have said, this all depends on the judge. As an example of what can happen, I'll tell you about a recent case with me. After initial shuffle in game one, two judges came and asked to do a deck check on both me and my opponent. They took our decks away, while we sat there awkwardly talking. Much later, they came back and said that both of our decks ...


5

This is a very complicated question. There are several factors to consider that make it impossible to answer without knowing a lot of details that you left out. Taken to the extreme, imagine a blackjack deck with 1 million extra Aces. In such a game, the player would have the advantage if the dealer was required to hold on 17. The player can hit until they ...


4

This mechanic sounds like "Blind Bid auction" In a blind bid auction all players select how much they will pay, and then find out the bids. Usually the highest bid wins and pays, but sometimes there are other rules The way most games do this is using the shield and fist method. Money is kept behind a shield so other players don't know how much money each ...


3

Nope it is not cheating and should not be considered such at all. The problem is that assuming you can't would mean that you are limited in what you can do to improve your skill at the game which may make it more enjoyable for you as a player. You asked "Does reading strategy guides before a game night count as cheating?" and my response is when ...


3

Given that this is a highly variable kitchen table game, most of the answers you'll get here are opinions. That said, I think that keeping your hand hovering next to the spoons is practically cheating, at the very least, it's a pretty cheap way to play. Not looking at your cards is fine, but everyone should have their hands in front of them unless they're ...


3

I don't know this game at all but will answer this in a broader etiquette sense. In games people make mistakes or they start taking a move and realise that they want to do something different. When I play games with people the rule is people can take back things provided it has no effect on anything else or a random event hasn't happened. So if a player (in ...


2

Yes, it is against the rules. The rules (as you quote) do not permit drawing a tile directly after discarding it. Rather than "is it against the rules?" (a question you seem to already know the answer to), you're asking if it is socially acceptable to break the rules in that fashion. i.e., "are take-backs allowed". The answer to that is ...


2

Extra aces (without extra other cards) increase the chances of blackjacks. If we assume a normal deck, there are 4 aces, and 12 faces; this means a blackjack is (4/52)*(12/51)=48/2652, or about 12/663. If we add 4 extra aces, it instead goes to (8/56)*(12/55) = 96/3080 = 12/385. just over twice as many blackjacks, before accounting for splitting two aces. ...


2

Checksums, CRCs, Hashes, etc. Computer science has a possible solution for this. In computer science, sometimes you need to verify that some received data hasn't been altered or corrupted. The simplest way to validate the data is called a checksum. If I have a sequence of data bytes, say [23, 128, 55], the checksum is calculated by summing all the bytes (...


2

If you're playing in any kind of organised play, there should normally be a store owner, tournament organiser or some kind of official you can report this to. This is normally the best approach as you don't then accuse the person directly and it's then in the hands of the official to investigate and discover what has happened. If you then report over time it ...


2

The way I handled this - as we played with a player who subscribes to the philosophy that "it's up to the other players to enforce the rules, and he is only 'using his resources' (the unknown being one)" - is we added writing down our resource transactions on paper face down (we use small notepads like you'd use in clue or yatzee) like this: Jim - roll - ...


1

In games I play with my friends, we just play with our resource cards revealed. (Development cards are still kept hidden, though.) We're not exactly tournament-level players. Counting cards is something we're bad at, and we don't tend to find particularly fun, either - so just having everyone display the resources they have at all times effectively mimics ...


1

Things like "lying" and "bluffing" are really the rightful subject of house rules. The rules of the original games don't encourage lying, but they don't always go out of their way to prevent it either, given their designers' knowledge that different players have different "standards." In order to prevent such lying in home games, the players should agree ...


1

It could be possible in two ways: Involve house rule of checking hand - each player is checked by the player on his right. Disadvantage of this method is then each player would have knowledge about one of his opponents hand. After playing monopol, note down every usage of that resource - trade, drawing and spending. Then you will easily find a cheating ...


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