25

"Draughts" is a family of closely related games, so you need to be more specific about exactly which game you mean. English draughts is exactly the same game as (American) checkers, the one played on an 8x8 board - and as someone brought up in the UK, I can confirm that is what people in the UK mean by "draughts". International draughts (also called Polish ...


15

There are many variants of checkers/draughts, and for most of them (including the Checkers variant played predominantly in the English-speaking world), promotion is both mandatory and ending the move. Quote from the American Checkers Federation's official rulebook: 1.16 When a man reaches the farthest row forward (known as the “king-row” or “crown-head”)...


14

This depends on the variation you're playing. A lot of variations allow capturing backwards with regular pieces (called men). The English variation is probably the most common that doesn't allow backwards capturing. By the international rules, capturing backwards is allowed (and mandatory if it results in the largest capture group). There's an extensive ...


13

(Warning: Clicking on the rulebook link below will download a Word document.) From the American Checkers Federation's official rulebook (emphasis mine): 1.16 When a man reaches the farthest row forward (known as the “king-row” or “crown-head”) it becomes a king, and this completes the turn of play. The man can be crowned by either player ( ) by placing ...


10

There are many variants of checkers/draughts, and for all of them (including the Checkers variant played predominantly in the English-speaking world), not only is jumping compulsory, it is also compulsory to keep jumping until all the jumps are completed. Quote from the American Checkers Federation's official rulebook: 1.19 If a jump creates an ...


10

As per the the Official FMJD Rules for International Draughts, if the opponent notices that you have not captured as many pieces as possible, they may decide whether the move stands or if it must be taken back and made again. 5.4. If a player has committed one of the following irregularities, his opponent has the right to decide whether that irregularity ...


10

No, on an 8x8 board and the regular American checkers rules, you can capture at most 9 out of the 12 pieces: The white king can capture here the sequence (in chess notation) h8 x f6 x h4 x f2 x d4 x b6 x d8 x f6 x d4 x b2 Note that the white king passes the squares f6 and d4 multiple times, which is allowed (what is not allowed, is jumping the same ...


10

Checkers is defintely not just tactics! While checkers is not in the same strategic league as chess, there are clear strategic concepts. For example, controlling the long diagonal is somewhat similar to the idea of controlling the centre in chess. Another example is playing to open one side, for the purposes of crowning pieces. This is analogous to the idea ...


10

It depends on if you are playing with mandatory capture rules or not. If you are playing with mandatory capture and they make a move instead of capturing a piece then you should tell them because they would be required to make the capture instead of another move. If you are not playing with mandatory capture then it doesn't matter but you can still tell them ...


9

I've seen some checker sets that have different faces on the two sides with one side typically being a crown. I remember one silly game where this came up we just made sure all the crown sides were down on all the pieces then flipped the checker to mark a king. We only did this when there weren't enough captured pieces to make a king.


9

The answer by @RemcoGerlich is essentially correct. Some extra info below. For further reference see the Dutch book Drie tegen een is gemeen, that contains a mathematical proof that 3 vs. 1 kings is a draw (which predates the age of perfect knowledge endgame databases by almost a decade!). The answer depends crucially on both the board geometry and the king ...


8

3 kings vs 1 king is usually not enough for force a win, because (as you discovered), you can't catch a king that can safely stay on the main diagonal. The rules say that 1 king vs 1 king (where neither king is immediately lost) is an immediate draw; 2 kings (or a king and a piece) vs 1 king is a draw if no captures occur within five moves, three kings (or ...


8

That is an optional rule called the Huffing Rule. Capturing pieces is compulsory. It is both players responsibility to make sure that is enforced.


7

He has 14 pieces and his opponent 16. So his strength compared to his opponent is 14/16 = 7/8. The exchange is the trade. Trade 13 pieces for 13 other pieces. So he has 14-13 = 1 and his opponent 16-13 = 3. So his opponent has three times as much pieces as he. The exchange has nothing to do with the promotion to king. When you are behind, it is often not ...


7

No, the game does not become unplayable. Years ago, I regularly played without mandatory capture rules, and found the experience enjoyable. There is also something called the Huffing Rule variant, where the capture is not forced, but by not taking the capture you lose that piece after your turn.


7

For American checkers on an 8x8 board, it is possible to get 24 kings on the board from the initial position. Here is a Java applet with a proof game of 211 moves. For International draughts on a 10x10 board, it is possible to get 40 kings on the board from the initial position. Here is a Java applet with a proof game of 389 moves.


7

Checkers was weakly solved in 2007: it was proven that the Chinook algorithm could never lose a game. So to get a perfectly played game you could have Chinook play against itself, but I can't find the final version of Chinook online or a record of its later games. You can check out its earlier games against humans here - most of those are draws, though there'...


7

This strikes me as a modified two player version of Peg Solitaire, rather than checkers. Notably: Players alternate turns except that a player is granted additional consecutive moves (i.e., captures) during a single turn, under certain circumstances. Players must readjust two separate pegs prior to their first move of a turn, then they must move using a ...


6

I am not a lawyer, and have experience only in Ontario, but under Ontario law wagering on games of skill is not gambling. In a well-known case from the 1960's or early 1970's, in which the St. Clair Bridge Studio was defending itself against charges of running a gambling house, barrister and bridge player Eric Murray in his winning defence argued that bridge ...


6

As was indicated by @JaysonSmith, a king can always be jumped by another king. This holds for any variant of draughts/checkers. The privileges that a king obtains differ by variant, however. backward movement: in all variants, kings can move backward, but men cannot. backward capture: in all variants, kings can jump backward, but men cannot for American/...


6

According to this set of the rules: A player wins the game when the opponent cannot make a move. In most cases, this is because all of the opponent's pieces have been captured, but it could also be because all of his pieces are blocked in. So you win if your opponent can't move. I have had this situation several times with draughts which is similar to ...


5

Nothing disallows this sequence of jumps. Pieces do not need to end on a different space to which they started the turn, kings are allowed to move and capture in any direction of play, and multiple jumps may be made if they are additional captures. Further, if these were the only pieces on the board, or if no other pieces could have been captured off the ...


4

All capturing moves are compulsory (with the exception of your choice of which capturing sequence to take). It is a special case that causes a pieces movement to end when it is promoted. In your case, the piece was already promoted before re-entering the king-row as part of a capturing sequence. Its movement does not end and you must continue to make the ...


4

The game does not become unplayable. In my opinion, for beginners like you I would actually reccomend playing with non-mandatory capture rules. I started out with non-mandatory capture rules and I actually found it thoroughly enjoyable. Once you've gotten the hang of checkers, move on to mandatory capture rules. With mandatory captures rules, the game goes ...


4

That's commonly referred as a "trade". In strategy / combat games, a trade can be applied to when you and your opponent equally lose with a move. You trade your pawn's life, for his, with the move leading to both player losing a pawn each. If you eat a opponent's piece putting yours in a position where it'll be eaten right after, that's a trade. Trades are ...


4

The American Checker Federation The ACF has the transcripts for a lot of games. By my count, they have 9,374 games recorded from 1952 to 2009. These are available for download. In these 10k games, there has been 460,381 moves made. Thus an average* game of checkers takes 49.11 moves or 24.56 moves per color. Here is a summary: White Wins: 1596 Draw: ...


4

Each player starts with 20 pieces. From Wikipedia: The gameboard comprises 10×10 squares in alternating dark and light colours, of which only the 50 dark squares are used. Each player has 20 pieces, light for one player and dark for the other, at opposite sides of the board. You use the first 4 rows (with 5 squares per row being used).


3

Yes, a kinged-piece can certainly jump another kinged-piece. In fact, having a kinged-piece does NOT make it invulnerable to being 'jump'. This means that even a NON-kinged-piece can jump a kinged-piece. The only advantage to kinging a piece is that it is able to move both Forward and Backward. A non-kinged-piece can be severely limited in jumping due to ...


3

As Wikipedia already details, there are many different draughts variants, but there are two common rules and one exotic rule according to which kings can capture. Long-ranged kings. This is the most common rule, which applies to e.g. the International/Brazilian/Canadian, Russian, Spanish and Czech draughts variants and to Pool checkers in the USA. A king ...


3

Yes, a king can do that, but he has to land in between two pieces. If the diagonal had been b - - w w - - -, he wouldn't have been able to capture the pieces. And yes, a king can change direction, but again, he has to land on the field where he changes direction. A player must capture as many pieces as possible. There are many variants of draughts, as ...


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