Hot answers tagged

48

Yes, you can capture the attacking piece with any one of your pieces, as long as you get out of the check. But in this case, the king is also attacked by the rook. So, you are checkmate.


44

What your friend is saying isn't "fake news", it's outright bull****. Of course computers can recognize 3-fold draws, in fact just about the first step of writing a new engine is to tell the engine what the rules of the game are. Here're the relevant lines in Stockfish's code: bool Position::is_draw(int ply) const { if (st->rule50 > 99 && (...


39

The queen is protected by the bishop on c5, i.e. the one on the dark square. Therefore you can't capture it. As the king has nowhere else to go, and no other piece can capture the queen or interpose, it's checkmate.


30

No, this in incorrect. A pawn may capture and promote on the same move, there's no rule prohibiting this (§3.7 of the official rules regulate pawn moves, including captures and promotions). With two rooks next to each other, the pawn might be 'pinned' because your king is on the same column and there are no other pieces or pawns in between; then, a capture ...


29

Your friend was wrong. There is no rule preventing a pawn from being promoted outside the normal move restriction rules (e.g. you can't leave your king in check).


29

This is called a double check. You're checked by both the pawn and the rook. Blocking, or capturing with a piece other than the king would only deal with one of those problems, so the only ways to deal with double check are to capture with the king (which you can't, here, because the pawn is protected) or to move the king some other way (which you can't, ...


28

Interesting question! Unfortunately it's not possible to easily reconstruct the complete game from the limited information available in the movie. Fortunately for us, this has been investigated in detail at chess.com, where they have done an awesome job of reconstructing the opening and ending from the movie. The game played in the movie is based on the ...


21

One of the following is true: There is a dominant strategy for White. There is a dominant strategy for Black. There are strategies for both players that guarantee they don't lose, i.e. perfect play results in a draw (e.g. as in Tic-Tac-Toe). No one knows which is true. Most experts guess that perfect play leads to a draw, and a few believe White can always ...


21

There's a correct list of World Champions (preceded by a list of players regarded as the world's strongest before the title existed) on Wikipedia. All of them are men, there hasn't been any woman considered to be the strongest chess player at a certain point of time. As for regional championships, Judit Polgar, mentioned by @BenjaminCosman, won the Hungarian ...


20

There is a quicker checkmate called the Fool's Mate which only takes 2 moves. The moves that demonstrate the checkmate are: 1. f3 e5 2. g4 Qh4#


20

Yes there is a female world chess champion. Currently that person is Ju Wenjun, who won the most recent Women's World Chess Championship against Aleksandra Goryachkina. If you're asking whether there has been a female open-category world chess champion, the answer is "no", in fact no woman has ever beaten a reigning undisputed world chess champion ...


19

Point 1 is the crucial one. Unless the coders have omitted the repetition rule altogether, then the bot will calculate its third repetition as leading to a draw. It may still choose it, but only when it calculates that no other alternative is any better - that is, that a draw is the best it can play for assuming you don't blunder. In this situation, either a ...


18

There are a variety of ways to level the playing field in chess. The two most common methods are material advantage and time odds, although there are also a number of more exotic handicaps that one can conceive of (e.g. giving away free moves, requiring a given piece to give checkmate, allowing the King to move two squares, etc). With material handicaps, ...


18

This was never legal. Rule 1.1. of the FIDE rules clearly states that the moves have to alternate. This was probably more of a house rule. Of course you can advance a pawn two spaces on it's first move (Rule 3.7b).


16

It's possible that your friend has hit upon a sequence that works against a particular engine running at a particular difficulty. But this will almost certainly not generalize. Engines can have something called a "contempt factor" which causes them to try to avoid draws if they evaluate the position as slightly negative. Whether this is present, and how ...


14

When the king castled through check, your opponent made an illegal move. Call it, and you win.


14

Not a trick. En passant is a rule of pawns in chess just as the rule for 2 square starting advance is. In fact its introduction to the rules came directly from the 2 square advance's introduction. From Wikipedia: En passant (from French: in passing) is a move in the board game of chess. It is a special pawn capture which can occur immediately after a ...


14

There has not yet been a female world champion in chess. According to Wikipedia, Judit Polgár is "generally considered the strongest female chess player of all time"; see the article for her many accomplishments.


13

No. A pawn gains no special movement rules when on the penultimate rank. Often in end-games the opposing King will be in front of the pawn to prevent it from being promoted.


12

Doing a quick search for "chess" and "immobilizer" led me to Baroque Chess.


12

The tactic in which one piece moves out of the way of a second so that the second can attack is called a discovered attack (and more specifically a discovered check if it results in check). The piece which moves may or may not move to a position to mount its own attack -- I'm not sure if there's a term for the specific case in which the piece that moves does ...


11

You can promote a pawn to any piece (other than a Pawn or King), regardless of how many of that piece is on the board. In theory, you could have nine Queens by the end of the game (unlikely, of course). Piece availability is not a concern, either. An upside-down rook (if available) is the recommended stand-in for a queen, though you may have to improvise ...


11

There was one very famous game, Spielmann vs. Tartakower, where Black kept his king in the center instead of castling, moved it forward on the 15th move, and again on the 21st move to reinforce his other pieces. Note, however, that these moves were made in the middle game, and not the opening. This game is actually unusual, because as another poster pointed ...


11

Pawns cannot capture in a forward direction, even though they move that way. If they could, there would be no way of blocking them. E.g. 1. e4 e5. 2. e4xe5. So the pawn cannot capture the blocking bishop. Pawns capture only in a forward diagonal direction. But there are two such directions; left diagonal and right diagonal. Pawns are the only pieces in ...


11

The move a Knight makes is typically called either a "Knight's move", or "L-Shaped". There aren't really any more common names than those, as the Knight and it's move are both relatively unique, and predate western chess; being one of two pieces that were directly imported from Chaturanga (the other is the Rook) in their current form. You will occasionally ...


11

It's a "playmate" chess set by Umbra. UPC: 028295167055


10

There is no ELO rating in go. And even no official international rating at all. A common question in go forums is "how does my rating in [whatever country or online server] compare with [other country or online server]". The European Go Federation is maintaining an international rating system where Ke Jie is rated 2956. goratings.org is an individual ...


10

The thing I know exists is a set with an extra queen each, so 34 pieces: https://www.chessbazaar.com/tournament-series-staunton-chess-pieces-with-german-knight-in-sheesham-box-wood-3-7-king.html This should cover like 99.9% of all games. If you want more (actually an extra Knight/Rook/Bishop might be needed in very rare situations), you can look for ...


10

You're in check. The black bishop on B7 is currently putting you in check, which means that you must stop that attack on your King. Your only two legal moves at this time are Qf3 - blocking the bishop Kg1 - moving the king away from check


9

Pawns can only capture diagonally. If there is a piece directly in front of them, they cannot move forward into that space. This isn't any different if they are moving onto the 8th rank to be promoted. From chess.com: Pawns are unusual because they move and capture in different ways: they move forward, but capture diagonally. Pawns can only move forward ...


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