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47

Yes, you can capture the attacking piece with any one of your pieces, as long as you get out of the check. But in this case, the king is also attacked by the rook. So, you are checkmate.


44

Under-promotion to bishop/rook happens from time-to-time. I've only seen it in three cases: The pawn will be captured regardless of what it's promoted to, and the promoting player wants to be cocky It's checkmate with just a bishop or just a rook, and the promoting player wants to be cocky (in those cases, a queen would mate also) Promoting to a queen is ...


32

No, a Pawn must be promoted to a Knight, Bishop, Rook, or Queen. Yes, pawn promotion isn't limited to captured pieces. My guess is that normal people don't carry around multiple sets of pieces, probably only tournaments. Most likely tournaments keep far more queens around than other pieces since promotion is usually to a queen (99% of the time). The ...


28

This is called a double check. You're checked by both the pawn and the rook. Blocking, or capturing with a piece other than the king would only deal with one of those problems, so the only ways to deal with double check are to capture with the king (which you can't, here, because the pawn is protected) or to move the king some other way (which you can't, ...


27

Interesting question! Unfortunately it's not possible to easily reconstruct the complete game from the limited information available in the movie. Fortunately for us, this has been investigated in detail at chess.com, where they have done an awesome job of reconstructing the opening and ending from the movie. The game played in the movie is based on the ...


27

Your friend was wrong. There is no rule preventing a pawn from being promoted outside the normal move restriction rules (e.g. you can't leave your king in check).


24

I highly suggest taking him through the puzzles in Polgar's book. The book starts off with very simple chess problems, with only a handful of pieces, with the idea of "solve for checkmate in x moves". The problems are designed with a logical progression, highlighting specific tactics and strategies, and become increasingly complex and demonstrating more ...


21

One of the following is true: There is a dominant strategy for White. There is a dominant strategy for Black. There are strategies for both players that guarantee they don't lose, i.e. perfect play results in a draw (e.g. as in Tic-Tac-Toe). No one knows which is true. Most experts guess that perfect play leads to a draw, and a few believe White can always ...


20

There is a quicker checkmate called the Fool's Mate which only takes 2 moves. The moves that demonstrate the checkmate are: 1. f3 e5 2. g4 Qh4#


18

There are a variety of ways to level the playing field in chess. The two most common methods are material advantage and time odds, although there are also a number of more exotic handicaps that one can conceive of (e.g. giving away free moves, requiring a given piece to give checkmate, allowing the King to move two squares, etc). With material handicaps, ...


18

This was never legal. Rule 1.1. of the FIDE rules clearly states that the moves have to alternate. This was probably more of a house rule. Of course you can advance a pawn two spaces on it's first move (Rule 3.7b).


17

Yes. This thread contains a set of sample games.


14

Not a trick. En passant is a rule of pawns in chess just as the rule for 2 square starting advance is. In fact its introduction to the rules came directly from the 2 square advance's introduction. From Wikipedia: En passant (from French: in passing) is a move in the board game of chess. It is a special pawn capture which can occur immediately after a ...


13

Yours is a good idea: introduce him to the pieces gradually (though not too gradually - five-year olds learn fast!). Here's another one: to make sure the rules of moving stick, place a piece on the empty board before each game, and ask him to point out all the spaces that piece can move to. After he's got that down (a few days/weeks, depending on how often ...


13

No. A pawn gains no special movement rules when on the penultimate rank. Often in end-games the opposing King will be in front of the pawn to prevent it from being promoted.


13

When the king castled through check, your opponent made an illegal move. Call it, and you win.


12

Theoretically, it is possible. In practice, it will never happen unless your opponent goes out of their way to let it happen. It is not unheard of for "real" games to involve one player having 2 queens at the same time, and there are no rules that prohibit multiple pawns from promoting to queens (although don't forget: sometimes it is better to promote to ...


12

Pawn promotion is mandatory and not limited to the pieces that have been captured. User1873's answer covers the details well. I wanted to answer the last part of your question in depth. It is not necessary for people to carry around extra sets, although many players and almost all teams will have multiple sets available to them at a tournament. In the ...


11

When I started working on my chess, I improved a lot just by playing at least one game a day with more experienced tournament players who would point out reasons why I lost afterwards. It was definitely more efficient than just reading chess books, which I did on the side. If there is a chess club nearby, you should definitely check it out. I am guessing ...


11

You can promote a pawn to any piece (other than a Pawn or King), regardless of how many of that piece is on the board. In theory, you could have nine Queens by the end of the game (unlikely, of course). Piece availability is not a concern, either. An upside-down rook (if available) is the recommended stand-in for a queen, though you may have to improvise ...


11

There is no ELO rating in go. And even no official international rating at all. A common question in go forums is "how does my rating in [whatever country or online server] compare with [other country or online server]". The European Go Federation is maintaining an international rating system where Ke Jie is rated 2956. goratings.org is an individual ...


11

There was one very famous game, Spielmann vs. Tartakower, where Black kept his king in the center instead of castling, moved it forward on the 15th move, and again on the 21st move to reinforce his other pieces. Note, however, that these moves were made in the middle game, and not the opening. This game is actually unusual, because as another poster pointed ...


11

The tactic in which one piece moves out of the way of a second so that the second can attack is called a discovered attack (and more specifically a discovered check if it results in check). The piece which moves may or may not move to a position to mount its own attack -- I'm not sure if there's a term for the specific case in which the piece that moves does ...


11

The move a Knight makes is typically called either a "Knight's move", or "L-Shaped". There aren't really any more common names than those, as the Knight and it's move are both relatively unique, and predate western chess; being one of two pieces that were directly imported from Chaturanga (the other is the Rook) in their current form. You will occasionally ...


10

Doing a quick search for "chess" and "immobilizer" led me to Baroque Chess.


10

Pawns cannot capture in a forward direction, even though they move that way. If they could, there would be no way of blocking them. E.g. 1. e4 e5. 2. e4xe5. So the pawn cannot capture the blocking bishop. Pawns capture only in a forward diagonal direction. But there are two such directions; left diagonal and right diagonal. Pawns are the only pieces in ...


10

The thing I know exists is a set with an extra queen each, so 34 pieces: https://www.chessbazaar.com/tournament-series-staunton-chess-pieces-with-german-knight-in-sheesham-box-wood-3-7-king.html This should cover like 99.9% of all games. If you want more (actually an extra Knight/Rook/Bishop might be needed in very rare situations), you can look for ...


8

Shogi is an excellent suggestion, being similar to Chess yet having the Asian origins that Go has. If you want to go for the more western games, Draughts or Checkers are closer to Chess than Mah Jong. The 5 in a row "Go moku" is also a fun, if simple game. It can be played with a standard Go set.


8

As a general rule of thumb, Knights are better in closed positions, and Bishops are better in open ones. Bishops are usually considered slightly better than Knights because they move faster, and you can force mate with 2 Bishops and the lone King vs opponent's lone King; something you cannot force with 2 Knights. It is really situational. With as many ...


8

On e4 the White pawn is strong, controlling the important central square d5 (which Black has given up some control over by playing c5). You might think that it is just as good to control d6, but d6 is less central. The loss of time is also significant. You spend a move to put the pawn on e5, and then another move to defend it with the queen. You will have ...


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