38

It does not address this directly in the rules but based on my reading it is illegal and against the spirit of the game. The game is wanting you to convey information from the spymaster to the operatives with a single word. While it may be acceptable to take the deliberations that the operatives have after a clue is given into account having them give ...


33

No. First entry under "Firm Rules" Your clue must be about the meaning of the words. You can't use your clue to talk about the letters in a word or its position on the table. I agree with a comment on another answer to keep the firm rule in place; as position clues can be used on every board, the game will become repetitive if they're allowed.


20

Yes, you can. While certain questions like this will be up to each play group to decide; this one is actually directly addressed in the rules. At the bottom of page 6: England and island were originally compound words, but in this century, island is a valid clue for ENGLAND. Even land is a valid clue for ENGLAND. And anybody who says you can't say ...


16

I gave a similar answer to a different question here But this is a different question with almost the same answer. The rules here say DON'T BE TOO STRICT So if the word is a legal clue then there is nothing in the rule to say you can't use a certain voice. I guess the balance is you couldn't use Western Film accent to say "Paris" to give a clue ...


13

No. From the Codenames rule book: Your clue must be about the meaning of the words. You can't use your clue to talk about the letters in a word or its position on the table. This rule is in place to keep the game interesting. I would recommend keeping close to the game rules, but if the spymaster thinks they've got the perfect clue (Maybe there are two ...


12

It looks like this could reasonably be considered to violate either the rule that the word must be in English ("colddd" is not in any dictionary of the English language) or the rule that your clue must be "only one word" without any additional hints. That is: it's not "only one English word without any additional hints". With ...


11

TL;DR. 'I'm' is fine as a clue. Others may disagree but they are 'looking for trouble'! The rules to Codenames here give lots of rules on what is or isn't a valid clue. I think the most important is this heading DON'T BE TOO STRICT They also say Sometimes you have to make judgment calls about what is valid and what is not. Different groups may prefer ...


10

The rule is that clues must be about the meaning of the word. Alliteration, assonance, consonance, and rhyme are all about the construction and pronunciation of the word, and have nothing to do with the meaning of the word, they would very much fall under the quoted rule and be illegal clues.


8

I can't see the rules mention anything about information from the team to the spymaster, so in general, it's not forbidden for the spymaster to listen to their team. The examples you give seem to be within the rules in the sense that apples and basses are edible, so the clue would be "about the meaning of the word". Then again, one could argue that after ...


7

It's not legal. It's highly stressed in the rules that clues must be about the meaning of the words. Until two seconds ago, I didn't know that Apple made self-driving cars. If I were the Spymaster in your hypothetical, and I said "self-driving, 2", I'd be giving an invalid clue because the clue would have nothing to do with the meaning of the words. The ...


6

If it's one English word and it's a clue about the meaning(s) of the word(s) on the table (and it isn't a form of any words on the table, etc.), then it's a valid clue, yes. Apostrophes are not prohibited. (Not rule to cite; it is difficult to prove a negative). For the question of "women's" vs. "woman's", etc., you are free to spell it ...


4

Codenames enjoys a variety of flexible rules and often it's up to the opposing spymaster to allow cases like this. 9/11 could definitely fit in either of the following 2 flexible rules, but since they are flexible rules, it's best left to the group to decide if it's allowed or not. While technically wildly different, 9/11 is not just a date, but it's the ...


4

Codenames was designed by Vlaada Chvatil, a Czech game designer, and in its original form was published by Czech games edition. So in that sense, the answer is none of the above. More generally, the best clues in Codenames are the ones that will lead your team to guess the right words, which means you should assume that you are playing in whatever version ...


4

Field Operatives are only allowed to discuss the clue after their Spymaster provides it, until their team's turn is over. Rules, P.4 "MAKING CONTACT When the spymaster gives a clue, his or her field operatives try to figure out what it means. They can debate it amongst themselves..." Same page: "Number of Guesses ...Any wrong guess ends the turn ...


3

No, that is not allowed. Looking at rules here they say :- If you are a field operative, you should focus on the table when you are making your guesses. Do not make eye contact with the spymaster while you are guessing. This will help you avoid nonverbal cues. When your information is strictly limited to what can be conveyed with one word and one ...


2

anticipate. Try to get those clues in other sets in previous turns. give a clue that fits all three but makes your spies wonder which of the three they should exclude. The goal is to have them think along the lines of "if it was brush and picture, he would have said painting; if it was picture and wall, he would have said hang." Here, you could say ...


2

As you quote, "Your clue must be about the meanings of the words." The "alliteration" clue is decidely not.


2

The rules mention an optional Expert rule: "0" clues. "You are allowed to use 0 as the number part of your clue. For example, feathers: 0 means, "None of our words relate to feathers." If 0 is the number, the usual limit on guesses does not apply. Field operatives can guess as many words as they want. They still must guess at least ...


2

Just as the rules say your group might agree to treat "New York" as a word, even though it is two words and therefore not allowed by the stock rules (and so the topic would need to be brought up and agreed upon before the game), your group might agree to allow numbers ("nine hundred and eleven") as words, even though some numbers are more ...


1

From the rules:- DON'T BE TOO STRICT and If the opposing spymaster allows it, the clue is valid. and Sometimes you have to make judgment calls about what is valid and what is not. Different groups may prefer to play the game differently. For any question about if a clue is a valid all the above applies. Unless there is a rule which prohibits a clue ...


1

The most important thing to consider is not how many cards each team still needs to win, but how many turns they need. You should be more willing to take risks in cases where success will decrease the number of turns you need while failure will not decrease the number of turns your opponent needs. For example, assume for a moment that other than the current ...


1

I think you covered most of it already; of course there are many other possible turn-counts. Theoretically team 1 can go for a 3+3+3 win in 3 turns; though that would be very difficult and require some luck as well. Another minor advantage for team 2: On team 1's first guess, they will always have the full board of 25 options to pick from. Whereas for team ...


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