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1

As the other answers suggest, your acquaintance is entirely wrong and every functional chess engine (not to mention the strongest ones available) understands draws by threefold repetition. Moreover, according to this Wikipedia article, there was a match in 2015 when Komodo played several grandmasters with odds, i.e. starting down material, and did not lose ...


2

I want to add from experience that against weaker engines there can be a sequence of moves that will lead to a certain outcome. I remember playing Ruy-Lopez as white against an old chess engine (7 years ago) with the engine always making the same move. After a certain point, I learnt a combination of moves which made the engine resign. The important point is ...


6

Even if there was no rule that entering the same position was a draw, a decent chess engine would add it as a rule. You cannot win if you keep repeating positions. For a checkmate, you must stop repeating positions at some point. So if you enter the same position a second time, limited depth evaluation of the position might tell you that the best move will ...


43

What your friend is saying isn't "fake news", it's outright bull****. Of course computers can recognize 3-fold draws, in fact just about the first step of writing a new engine is to tell the engine what the rules of the game are. Here're the relevant lines in Stockfish's code: bool Position::is_draw(int ply) const { if (st->rule50 > 99 && (...


16

It's possible that your friend has hit upon a sequence that works against a particular engine running at a particular difficulty. But this will almost certainly not generalize. Engines can have something called a "contempt factor" which causes them to try to avoid draws if they evaluate the position as slightly negative. Whether this is present, and how ...


6

Well, first of all, going "back" is often not an option. Pretty much every opening involves pawn moves, and you can't take those back. You also can't undo captures. So clearly you'll have to do some work just to get into a situation where the computer can take its move back, let alone will. The computer generally has a attributes that it's working towards, ...


18

Point 1 is the crucial one. Unless the coders have omitted the repetition rule altogether, then the bot will calculate its third repetition as leading to a draw. It may still choose it, but only when it calculates that no other alternative is any better - that is, that a draw is the best it can play for assuming you don't blunder. In this situation, either a ...


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