12

I received the following e-mailed answer from Jonathan Bove of FFG: Since all of the players fulfilled the victory condition at the same time, it is a joint victory. However, this shouldn't stop the player with 6 colonies from bragging about his or her intergalactic skills! Since this is direct from FFG, I will take this to be the official answer.


8

Having not played this game, or played in the group you're playing, I can't give specifics, but I can talk a bit about my experiences with subterfuge in other contexts. (poker is a classic for this) The first, most important thing is that you need to have a story in mind that you want the other person to believe. Simply saying no when you would normally ...


7

My understanding is that the Zombie's power is a replacement effect, meaning their ships never go to the warp. Given this, the official rules state that compensation is taken for each ship that the player loses to the warp when playing a negotiate card: If One Player Plays a Negotiate Card and the Other Plays an Attack Card: if you played a Negotiate ...


6

You absolutely can attack a planet with no defenders. On page 8 of the rulebook it states: Defending with Nothing? Even though a player may no longer have a colony on one of his or her home planets, that player must still defend it. Which certainly confirms that you can attack an unoccupied world.


6

The ship is destroyed. Both abilities are trying to interact with ships that would be going to the void. The FAQ for the Fantasy Flight version (the most recent to date), indicates that Void trumps all other abilities. Q: Is there an official ruling on Zombie vs Void? A: Void trumps Zombie. Zombie's power kicks in when it should go to the warp, however the ...


6

The change is permanent. (Yes, it is powerful, but Wild flares are often powerful; frequently more powerful than the Super, which is usually just an enhancement to the base power.) The fact that the change is permanent also helps to clarify your question. The defender isn't using the attacker's power; the defender is using their own power, which happens to ...


5

I believe this is entirely up for player interpretation, but my opinion is: since Cosmic Encounter doesn't have rules for tie-breaking, and since situations where several player meet the victory conditions is interpreted as a shared victory - one player having MORE than 5 colonies is completely identical to this player having 5 colonies, thus he will share a ...


5

The Fantasy Flight Games rule book addresses this in multiple locations Stripping a Planet of Ships As soon as a player removes the last of his or her ships from any planet, that player no longer has a colony on that planet. Any ships involved in the encounter cannot return to that planet. Ships retrieved from the warp cannot return to that planet. That ...


5

Notice that the text of the Parasite say that "...you may use this power to ally..." (emphasis mine). It does not say "... you may use this power by allying...". The point is that the use of the power and the actual process of allying are not one-and-the-same; using the power triggers and allows for allying when not invited. So as long as you have three ...


5

Yes, as long as the planet is still there. The defender defends as normal (playing an encounter card) but with no ships. From the rules on Launch (page 8): Note that, in a home system, the defense may not have any ships on the targeted planet, in which case he or she defends the planet with zero ships. If green were to draw a green destiny card, ...


4

You played this correctly. The only rule explicitly stating that the offense gets to change their Destiny card is when they draw their own system. The rule book is also explicit that the defending player must still defend, but with 0 ships (on page 12): As stated earlier, if a player has no colony on a home planet that he or she is defending, the player ...


4

While there's no specific rule governing this in the rulebook, the board gaming community as a whole seems to agree that the number of cards in a player's hand is public knowledge. There are a lot of forum threads that reiterate this answer on both BGG and Fantasy Flight Games (here, here, and here, for starters). The basic reasoning for this is because ...


4

One of the main things to remember here is that you "play" your encounter card face down, and then reveal it after both main players have done so. For reference, the rules for this phase are the following: Play Encounter Cards: After alliances have been formed, the offensive player and the defensive player each choose an Encounter card (Attack or ...


4

First, let's make sure we are using the actual Eon texts (the ones given in another answer here are not the originals, as evidenced by the references to "ships" and "encounters"). Here are the originals: You have the power to torture. As the offensive or defensive player, after alliances are formed, you may describe to your opponent a ...


3

Yes. (As Anti-Matter's opponent, anyway. As an ally, Warrior is just fine.) Anti-Matter's power isn't so much unclear as kind of complicated: - Anti-Matter's tokens subtract. - Ally tokens subtract. - Opposing main player's tokens add. - Low total wins. And if you think Warrior's bad against Anti-Matter, spare some sympathy for the poor Virus. (No? Not ...


3

I'll start by saying that there won't be an explicit answer to this question. Cosmic Encounter is about interactions, and given the number of aliens with different powers, sometimes you just have to make it up as you go and use some logic to come to the best conclusion. I think this is probably one of those situations. My interpretation would be when you ...


3

This depends upon which version you are playing. Eon: Yes, Zombie gets compensation. This was stated twice in Encounter magazine, with the rationale being that Zombie did indeed lose his ships from the encounter, they just went to other colonies instead of to the warp. Mayfair: Yes again, although Mayfair flip-flopped their answer twice. Yes, then No, then ...


2

I play a lot of board games, with the same group, and people know that I am a lier (in game I mean !) and that I will backstab them if this makes me win the game. They also have the habit to target me as first priority in conquest games. Nethertheless, I still manage to convince them at key points to believe me and to make choices that actually help me. ...


2

Here is a pretty detailed and somewhat graphical rundown of the differences among editions, including comprehensive lists of which version has which aliens, organized both by edition and by alien name. Cosmodex Appendix C on Boardgame Geek


2

The answer is yes because he is responsible to announce when any player(s) have fulfilled the winning conditions now. So he has to know what the winning conditions are.


2

I found proper wordings for the abilities. Wrack power is: You have the power to Torture. As main player, after alliances are set but before cards are selected, you may use this power to offer your opponent a deal, following the regular rules for making a deal. If he rejects your offer, you may torture him once for each ship you have in the ...


2

By default, alien powers are revealed after everyone has one. The rulebook does not make this clear up front, but it must be true since the other option you mention is in the Variants section on p14: Hidden Powers In this variant, players leave their alien sheets facedown after selecting them at the start of the game. While a player’s alien sheet remains ...


2

When returning ships to your bases, you may put the token(s) on any bases where you currently have tokens. Four is just the starting number, not the limit. You can have more than four. (Note some rulesets call bases "colonies" instead. It's the same thing -- it just refers to your ships on a planet.)


1

Summary The effect that tells you to get the ships back will tell you where you can put them. Whether or not there is a limit depends on where the ships are going. Normally, this will be to one of your colonies, which do not have a ship limit. Full Explanation The effect that tells you to get the ships back will tell you where you can put them. Ships ...


1

The Warp is correct. Any time you are supposed to put ships on colonies but don't have any colonies, your ships go to the warp ... with one exception: If you are retrieving a ship from the warp during your own Regroup phase and have no colony to put it on, you instead put it on the hyperspace gate and use it in your encounter. However, I do have to ask... ...


1

Hmm, good question. Putting your very last token(s) into battle is a risky thing. I think they should go to the warp. You give up a base when you remove your last token from it -- that shouldn't change if they're your very last. And having all your tokens in the warp doesn't remove you from the game or prevent you from capturing a new base on your next turn.


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