9

Now that the black mistake in the original sequence has been explained by Laval, maybe it's interesting to give an analyse of the original position. It's not very easy to tell who will be able to play first at a. $$ Initial position $$ -....... $$ -....... $$ -...OOOO $$ -.....XO $$ -.OOOOOX $$ -XOXXO.X $$ -aX..XX. $$ -....... $$ -------- If the ...


7

There are many books written on this subject; Ron Klinger's 'Improve Your Bridge Memory' was the one I used, but I imagine your public library or bridge club will have a selection. The problem is that nobody but yourself knows what methods work for you. Two examples from Klinger, one easy and one harder; you don't need to count how many of your own trumps (...


5

Simple answer: There is no such thing as "non-fully walled territory". So far as the upper left is concerned, black has exactly two points: D10 and F10. All the rest is not territory, because it's not enclosed. Sure, it's all potential territory, but it only becomes actual territory when black takes that critical L11 point to actually enclose it. So if ...


5

This isn't really a finished game. If both players passed, then all of the points around E13 would count as dame just like the ones around H8, and wouldn't be territory for Black. This wouldn't happen in a serious game, so in a beginners' game, you would notice the problem during the scoring and probably just fix it.


4

I will only discuss the Japanese pro rules, since as far as I know there are no official European rules. The tournament of the European Go Congress 2015, for example, was played with AGA rules. I think most European tournaments are played with "Verbal European-Japanese Rules" which usually require to fill all dame points and kos before the end of the game. ...


4

Those points should count. There must be a bug in the program.


4

Firstly, note that it doesn't matter who owns what territory until the game is over, and none of these are realistic ending scenarios. However, let's assume the game did end with each of your first two boards. On the first board, the entire board would be considered White's territory. On the second, among two good players, Black and White would agree that ...


4

You can't count it as 4 double runs, as that double counts a number of elements. It is 4 runs of 3 8H, 9H, 10C 8H, 9D, 10C 8D, 9H, 10C 8D, 9D, 10C and 2 pairs (the 8s and 9s) for a total of 16.


3

The answers about counting by Benjamin Cosman and TimK are up to the point, but there is more in this position. Imagine, that black walls in the white position like this $$ --------------------- $$ | . . . . X O . a . | $$ | . . . . X O . . . | $$ | . . . . X O O O O | $$ | . . . . X X X X X | $$ | . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . ...


3

The Chase-Simon experiment with expert and novice chess players suggests that you don't need a superhuman memory to play bridge, and, moreover, that what you perceive as a memory-skills deficit between yourself and better bridge players is more likely to be caused by their being good bridge players rather than the cause. (If you haven't read about this ...


2

Your big mistake was your slack move at 12. It's a bit scary to have Black make two shimaris. The reason he shouldn't have done this is that his two stones in the bottom left corner were left stranded. You should have played 12 one or two points to the left of 13, and chased these stones. This would have given you an initiative that would have more than ...


1

Just a few things to note here: The vast majority of the moves, black and white, are played on the third line; this emphasises territory over influence. As far as third-line territory is concerned, you're both fairly equal. Black starts to break into the fourth line early with E4; this is a common joseki move which serves to strengthen black's group while ...


1

When there are stones in a territory like that at the end of the game, as long as both players agree on their status, then they can be counted as dead. Otherwise there are ways of resolving the dispute that don't affect the score so that your idea of White losing points can be avoided. In general playing stones that can't live in a territory either loses a ...


1

I've always called this kind of configuration a "quadruple run of 3" for 16. There are 4 runs of three (2 choices for the 8, 2 choices for the 9, 1 choice for the 10 or 2*2*1=4) and 2 pairs. So the hand is worth 16 ((4*3)+(2*2)=16). Obviously, some quadruple runs also have some fifteens built into them that you have to count. Keep in mind that "double ...


1

Here's the way I've approached it. I am still learning but seem to be getting better. First, my partner and I practice counting and visualizing online against a pair of robots. There are downsides to the robots (they don't always card the way humans do), but they're good about letting you chat as much as you like. After bidding, whether we're declarers or ...


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