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5 votes

Using the edges of the board in Go

Firstly, note that it doesn't matter who owns what territory until the game is over, and none of these are realistic ending scenarios. However, let's assume the game did end with each of your first ...
Benjamin Cosman's user avatar
4 votes

Using the edges of the board in Go

The answers about counting by Benjamin Cosman and TimK are up to the point, but there is more in this position. Imagine, that black walls in the white position like this $$ --------------------- $$ | ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

How to evaluate this board situation under Japanese or European rules

I will only discuss the Japanese pro rules, since as far as I know there are no official European rules. The tournament of the European Go Congress 2015, for example, was played with AGA rules. I ...
havogt's user avatar
  • 416
3 votes
Accepted

Is this a correct way to count territory in Go (by Chinese rules)?

Those points should count. There must be a bug in the program.
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,488
2 votes

Has black’s moyo already given them an advantage

Your big mistake was your slack move at 12. It's a bit scary to have Black make two shimaris. The reason he shouldn't have done this is that his two stones in the bottom left corner were left stranded....
Tom Au's user avatar
  • 22.2k
1 vote
Accepted

Has black’s moyo already given them an advantage

Just a few things to note here: The vast majority of the moves, black and white, are played on the third line; this emphasises territory over influence. As far as third-line territory is concerned, ...
goldPseudo's user avatar
  • 6,682
1 vote

Using the edges of the board in Go

When there are stones in a territory like that at the end of the game, as long as both players agree on their status, then they can be counted as dead. Otherwise there are ways of resolving the ...
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,488

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