12

There are lots of different versions of the rules, so it is hard to give an exact quote and page reference, but they all agree on the resolution of this. The version I found says "A unit moves with its own strength combined with all of its valid supports. Unless it is opposed by a unit that is equally or better supported, it can complete its move." In this ...


12

We have Austria F Ion-Gre Turkey F Aeg-Gre Italy F EMa-Aeg F Ion-Gre bounces with F Aeg-Gre because both have strength 1 so nobody wins. As a result the fleets never leave their spaces and thus F Aeg stays at Aeg. So F EMa-Aeg attacks an occupied space. Both have strength 1 so both stay at their spaces with the end result that nothing changes.


10

Yes, the online Diplomacy playing site Backstabbr has a "sandbox" feature that does that. It is perfect to go through attack scenarios and see how they end up. For practicing submitting orders, you enter orders by clicking on the map, and see how they would be written by hand. You don't submit textual orders. I guess you could write them down by hand first,...


10

It is possible for an army to be convoyed my multiple countries (although you should write the orders differently than you did in your example). First, the relevant rules: Convoying an Army Across Several Water Provinces If Fleets occupy adjacent water provinces, an Army can be convoyed through all these water provinces on one turn, landing in a coastal ...


8

The quote below is part of a rule. So yes, I would play it like you suggest, because your situation matches this rule in the strictest sense (one center versus zero units). If he/she has more centers than units, he/she may build units by placing them, one in each unoccupied supply center, in his/her home country only (provided that such supply centers are ...


8

In the rules as of 2015, this is covered under "Standoff Rules": Units can’t trade places without the use of a convoy. If two units are each ordered to the province that the other occupies, neither can move. and then in "Support in Standoffs": Diagrams 10 and 11 show two common standoff situations. In both cases, a strength of 2 meets ...


7

I believe the traditional response is to feed the game board to a tiger and award the offending player a toothbrush covered in jam. Which is to say, you're asking what the rules say should happen in a scenario that cannot happen if you're following the rules. That implies a contradiction, and contradiction implies anything. The rules of the game say "......


7

No, you can only give orders for your own units. The first sentence of paragraph 2, "Order writing phase" in the rules is, emphasis mine, Each player secretly writes "orders" for each of his/her own units on a slip of paper.


6

Ok So I found the answer on this post: All armies and fleets destroyed - Still in Game? @bwarner said: Even if it wasn't a home supply center they are technically not eliminated from the game. They could be included in a draw despite having no pieces on the board (and no way of getting more). You aren't eliminated until you have zero centers during a ...


6

A unit that is supporting is also holding and is always eligible to receive support in its hold. The relevant quote from the rulebook is: A unit not ordered to move can be supported by a support order that mentions only its province. A unit that is ordered to hold, convoy, support, or not ordered at all can receive support in holding its position. The ...


6

If these are all orders from one country, nothing happens. From the rules: A country cannot dislodge or support the dislodgement of one of its own units If "F StP -> Nwy" is a different country from the other two orders, the unit in StP is dislodged. From the rules: Support is cut if the unit giving support is attacked from any province except the ...


5

The support fails. From the bottom right of page 7 in the rules. A unit not ordered to move can be supported by a support order that only mentions its province. and A unit ordered to move can only be supported by a support order that matches the move the unit is trying to make.


5

Moscow is moving to Warsaw with strength 4 (itself + 3 supports). Warsaw is moving to Moscow with strength 3 (itself + 2 support). The Army in Prussia moving into Warsaw is irrelevant (It's of strength 1, which is also less than 4). The MOS-WAR move has greater strength, so succeeds and the Army in Warsaw is dislodged. The Prussian army remains in Prussia.


5

From the rules: A unit ordered to move can only be supported by a support order that matches the move the unit is trying to make. The support order was: A Bur S English F Nrs - Bel The move order was: A Yor - Bel (Possible because of F Nrs C A Yor - Bel) There are two conflicts: - The supported unit is a Fleet, the moved unit is an Army. This alone ...


5

Short answer: Yes. Longer answer: you can enter an area that is left by another unit. But there are some conditions. If unit leaving the space succeeds in moving out: if there are no other units that are ordered to enter the space, you succeed in entering it. if there are other units ordered to enter the space, the strongest (with the most support) ...


5

Asuming the other fields are not relevant, we have the following setup: The fleet in ion can not moves to adr because it is blocked. Both the french fleet in tys as the ottoman fleet in aeg try to move to ion, both with support. Equal forces block. So both fail. Leaving the previously blocked fleet in ion unharmed. So no unit moves. Leaving the setup ...


4

Erlend Janbu's variant South America v. 3.2 for four players was designed with the explicit aim "to create a variant where there are no stalemate lines." In a 2001 article on the variant he admits that he does not know for sure whether there is a stalemate line in his variant, but "I and others have searched, and after 100 games, no game has ended in a ...


4

There are certain context for this strategy. Qin's strategy was only used for the major powers, any of which could crush others and were ready to do so. In general, there is great distrust among great powers, who cannot be permanent allies due to conflicts of major interests. In that case, allying with your neighboring powers against farther powers is not ...


4

This alliance can work long-term if Russia is comfortable with a northern expansion vector. Short-term, Austria and Russia can conquer Turkey, divide the spoils and fortify. Park fleets in the Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean seas and you're done. Russia keeps only enough hardware in the south to prevent a stab, in parity with Austria. If Austria gets in ...


4

It's no wonder you've had so much difficulty playing France! You've been playing it wrong the whole time! Now, to be fair, there isn't really a "correct" way to play different Powers. But some strategies are better than others. That being said, you're focusing on the wrong front, which is why you keep getting screwed. Think about it like this . . . The ...


4

Simply, when it is a commitment required of (or an opportunity provided by) your best possible alliance. Although the tactical situations are not irrelevant in Diplomacy, they should always be regarded as secondary to the choice of allies and alliances. Any country can win, and one should regard the game as more akin to Survivor than to a typical strategy ...


4

A unit holding that has more or equal valid support to hold than its attacker stays put (wins). Here are some examples: Example 0: Greater Valid Support To Hold Army Gascony -> Paris Army Brest supports Gascony -> Paris Army Paris Holds Army Belgium supports Paris Army Ruhr supports Pairs Paris's support plus itself is 3 strong, and Gascony's support ...


4

Ultimately I think it would be like playing Chess blind, only more difficult because many pieces change positions at the same time. It would certainly be possible for a dedicated player to hold the positions of all pieces in their head, but would likely be extremely frustrating for a new player. It might be useful for the player to have an "adviser" who does ...


4

I like to use jDip. It is easy to use, and provides several maps.


4

The diplomacy phase is the significant part of the game. So limiting this will affect the game. This site advices a longer period: Combinations and agreements among the players may affect the course of the game a great deal. These are determined during the diplomacy period which takes place before each move. This period lasts 30 minutes before the ...


4

Diplomacy is a long game. You want to enforce time limits in order to keep the game moving at a good pace. Time limit: 10 minutes is on the short side. I would recommend starting with 15 minutes and altering it as necessary according to how the players feel about the lengths. Don't separate negotiation and writing down phases: 15 minutes combined for ...


4

Indeed, there was a problem with the resolution engine to manage this kind of situation in Conspiracy. I've worked on it and it's now fixed. From now on the server has been updated and all the next resolutions will be managed correctly. In application side, the analyse engine will keep displaying this error as long as players are using the version 2.9.0 and ...


4

Fleets in coastal provinces cannot convoy. To convoy, you have to be in the open water. From the rules (emphasis mine): Convoying an Army Across One Water Province A Fleet in a water province (not a coastal province) can convoy an Army from any coastal province adjacent to that water province to any other coastal province adjacent to that water province. ...


3

Somewhat trivially, the Pure variant has no stalemate lines. This is a simple traditional variant of diplomacy. There are the usual seven countries. There are seven spaces on the board - one corresponding to each country - its home supply center. These spaces are all connected by land one with another. Initially, each player begins with one army ...


3

There are four main factors that make an attack dangerous in diplomacy: The relative number of units attacking vs defending Adjacency of the territories you are defending How many territories there are surrounding your territories How many sea-land transitions the attacker has to make In general, more units will always beat fewer units given enough time. ...


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