8

In pair competitions, yes absolutely ; everything about each hand is identical every time it is played. The dealer and vulnerability is determined by the board number usually - a sixteen board rotation covering all combinations of dealer and vulnerability. The holder has a number and the dealer and vulnerability marked on it. See this picture from wikipedia: ...


6

I am not a TD, but I am a qualified Club Director, and this situation is actually a fairly clear one. Under the Laws of Duplicate Bridge , laws 61-64 govern revokes. It is a common misunderstanding that there is no penalty if the dummy revokes. There is no automatic adjustment in such cases, but the Director should attempt to restore equity, and a proper ...


4

This Aces on Bridge shows a good example of this. Look in the "Bid with the Aces" section. What this describes is an auction where you're exploring NT, and trying to figure out if you're comfortable with coverage in all four suits. If you have an auction like: N E S W 1C - 1H - 1S - 1NT - 2D - ? - 2D there would be "asking" for ...


4

I would never pull a double on that auction, regardless of my hand. "The book of rebids by preempter is 1000 pages long, and they're all blank," as the saying goes. Responder is the captain on this auction, and the double is not cooperative. If I'm not willing to sit this double, I shouldn't have opened. West's double is a bit aggressive, but not ...


3

I agree with ruds - sort of. I play with my partners that double by preempter is "I want to sacrifice"; explicitly so that preempter's partner can say "I don't". Preempter doesn't get to pull (playing any standard system). If their contract makes, it's partner's misguess. So that's question 2 solved. Having said that, the answer to &...


3

David Siegel has the laws almost perfect (and thank you for that!) He didn't mention that there is also no automatic trick penalty for the second revoke in the same suit (even if it wasn't from dummy), 64B2: "it is a subsequent revoke in the same suit by the same player, the first revoke having been established." But either 64B exception works ...


3

Here are two auctions that aggressive bidders could use to reach a small slam, using common methods in a 2/1 base system: W E 1NT | 15-17 2H 2S | transfer to spades; acceptance 4S 5C | mild slam try; club control 5D 6S | diamond control; everything's covered For pairs that play Texas transfers, a 2-level transfer followed by a jump to game ...


3

The answer is; you don’t. Not with normal 2/1 methods, anyway; and even pretty out there methods would have a hard time finding this. Why? Because it’s dependent on so many things. The seven card heart fit AND the short jack. The spades splitting 2-2, or guessing the finesse. The partnership has only eight top tricks, and the rest depend on distribution. ...


3

In addition to the other two great answers here, I'll expand a bit more on the "why". Basically, your goal is to describe your hand as low as possible and as accurately as possible, right? So you want to show partner whether you have 4 hearts or 5 hearts at the earliest moment possible, while showing other details about your hand too. If you play ...


2

As others are saying, it's a 5-or-7 hand; if you can pick up the spade suit (which has some luck involved in real life when it's 3-1 with stiff honour than double-dummy) you make everything when the heart J drops in three rounds; if you can't pick up the spade suit, the club lead will mean you lose two tricks. 5-or-7 hands are the ones you never want to see;...


2

I have never heard that phrase for the concept, but it's a very valid one. The version I hear is "two suits shows, one suit asks". That is, if there are two suits your side are concerned about (stoppers for NT), you bid the one you have (and NT with both, of course); with only one suit of concern, if you bid it, you're asking for one (because you'...


2

The short answer: because it's just a good idea. Expanding a bit: One of the primary goals of bidding is to find the best game available. In no trump, game is 9 tricks. In a major suit, it takes 10. In a minor suit, it takes 11 tricks. When you find a good trump fit (8 cards or more in the trump suit), you can usually take about one additional trick with ...


1

An interesting situation. I'm not a bridge lawyer, but a bit of seaching pointed me to this source. The director should not apply the Revoke Laws. The defenders, however, may well be due an adjustment. This is in line with my common sense. It is not a revoke, but the defenders have been damaged. Even though they, too, had a chance to count that the dummy ...


1

The outstanding Spades are QJT9 in West's hand, West having already played the 8 and K to East's (original) doubleton A2. Assuming OP hasn't misled on describing the Spade spots, the Heart Q is absolutely marked in the West hand - doubleton or singleton - by the failure of West to lead a (setting) third round of Spades at trick 4. After winning Trick 2 with ...


1

On further consideration, while E might hold the H Q, East cannot hold the H Qxx or better, because then East would have responded to 1S, probably with 1NT. Therefore the finesse is either hopeless or pointless, because if East has the QH singleton or doubleton it will drop. Playing for the drop is still the better play, although it will fail if west has the ...


1

Because a 3-4-3-3 hand is much more suited to a Notrump than a Heart contract. A 2H call must perforce deny 4 cards in any of Clubs, Diamonds, or Spades (unless it is a hand believed to be much stronger than Opener's, which lies outside the scope of this Question and Answer), so if holding only 4 Hearts must be the contract killing four-triple-three. To ...


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