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9

I think games companies often estimate the time based on players who know the game. My first few plays of a game will often run long compared to the estimated time on the box, but my tenth, fiftieth or hundredth play will often come in around the box estimate (or less). Eclipse is a big game with lots of things to take account of (various technologies, ...


7

Eclipse is a complicated game. If you have never taught the game yourself, expect a teaching game to take 4-7 hours. It took me about 20-30 minutes to learn the game. I am an experienced gamer, had browsed the rulebook, and the player teaching me had taught others before. For a first-time teacher and inexperienced players, I estimate teaching will take at ...


5

This is from the official FAQ on BGG: (italics added by me) Q: What happens if I cannot return a Population cube to a track because it is full? This might occur if you return cubes from grey squares to different tracks than where they originally came from. A: The track may be filled completely, so that no number is visible. This means that you do not have ...


5

1. Where would I find original graphics to modify? You could use a scanner. Many home and office printers can act as a scanner, so it should be pretty easy to get access to one. 300dpi is sufficient, but avoid anything lower. In this particular case, you could derive from this. 2. How can I produce good quality boards? Depends on what material you want ...


5

Page 7 of the official rulebook states in relation to Ancient Ship Parts (which are the special type of parts you are referring to): you may place this part in any of your Ships (returning an exist­ing part if needed); you may also keep the part next to your board and place it later with the Upgrade action; if you later want to replace an Ancient ...


4

When you move the influence disk, pick up the disk from the hex and place according to the rules i.e. to a hex that does not contain an Influence Disc or an enemy Ship and is adjacent to a hex where you have a disc or a Ship. to a hex where only you have a Ship. The disk cannot move across the explored space on it's own Q: Using the Influence action, I ...


4

No, you cannot. The rules don't specifically clarify this; but there is nothing that would ever allow you to destroy a starbase or ship of your own. A combat only occurs when multiple ships/starbases belonging to different players are in the same sector; and combat is the only way that the rules allow for something to be removed from the board.


4

By the best evidence I can find, no, you cannot remove an enemy influence disc with the Influence action. You are correct that by a literal reading of the second edition rules, this would be allowed. It appears that this is an oversight that was made when they updated the wording for the second edition. The best evidence would be that the first edition ...


3

Make it fun! Our group turns it into a social event. Playing casually, we don't "gang up" or try hard to get eliminations, but we do try to win. Even so, eliminations are pretty rare and randomness is fun. Finally, if the game is too long for you, play another game. As everyone gets more skilled, you can make it more and more competitive.


3

Full disclosure: I have never played eclipse. From what you describe about what you like and what you don't like I have some suggestions to make this game shorter and easier to learn. House rules to the rescue! I would start by making the game semi random. In really though draw based games where I am struggling with a multifaceted mechanic, I remove some ...


2

You are correct. Ships are not repairing in between battles between players on a single hex. Repairing ships is done at the end of the entire combat phase along with drawing reputation tiles and placing influence disks. (page 21 of the rules).


2

I believe that they are intended to apply to the entire ship. I've come to this conclusion for two reasons: First, the text of the ROTA rulebook reads: Two modified Ion Missiles capable of warping the flux grid, giving two Initiative. If they were intended to apply only to the missiles, it seems likely that it would be indicated in this text. Second, ...


2

Once you know the rules and what the tiles do it speeds up considerably. With 3+ players every person should easily have an idea of what they plan on doing for their move before their turn comes up. As soon as it is their turn they should have their shit on the table. It only takes longer because the group is playing casually and not paying much attention. ...


2

This game (eclipse) with all of its additions is my favorite game. Its randomness is one of it key strengths with no game being the same. Played two games last weekend, both 3 player ones with new or near 'noob' players. Both took over 7 hours to finish )including dinner). As there is indeed a certain learning curve which is not for everyone, do not make it ...


2

The developers have posted official goodies on this boardgamegeek page. I don't see a scoring track file, but there is a compact technology board in pdf format and other files you could take graphics from. I'm not familiar with techniques on how to make a high-quality product, but I'm sure it will involve a decent colour printer, some heavy cardboard ...


2

In the pattern you propose, players A, B, and C all come out losing, and given what you propose, they should have known they would come out losing. Thus, they didn't make the best choice for them. It is true that Eclipse, unlike most Eurogames I've played, rewards attacking weaker players, as opposed to encouraging you to go after the person in the lead to ...


1

Average Dice: The easiest solution would to use an average die, i.e. a d6 with the faces: 0/1/1/2/2/3 0 is a automatic miss 3 is a automatic hit A modified 3 is a normal hit, e.g. a rolled 1 with +2 from computers is a hit. While the extreme swings (all dice show automatic hit/miss) are not mitigated, the impact of the modifiers (computers, shields) is ...


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