66

ALPHA cards are black bordered and have very very rounded edges ( 2mm radius ) compared to all other kinds of magic cards ( 1mm radius ). Just pick up a black bordered card and overlay them on top of each other. If the corners are VERY different then you have ALPHA, otherwise you have BETA. There are several cards that were corrected between alpha and beta ...


19

The differences between the original version of Pandemic and the 2013 version are essentially cosmetic. The only significant change is to the Role cards. The 2013 games features 2 new roles, Contingency Planner and Quarantine Specialist, that aren't in the original version. It also has the revised Operations Expert from the original On The Brink expansion. ...


12

Here are most of the major changes (including expansions). (Since a lot of Eon Cosmic fans also played the Mayfair 2nd ed, I've mentioned a it where relevant.) Main gameplay The basic game mechanics are unchanged. Hand size is now 8. Flares are Eon-style, not Mayfair-style (once played they return to the hand, and are only lost when a new hand is redrawn)....


12

You don't restock your hand of cards, you restock the four money cards on the board which are available to take, the same way you restock the tiles available to buy. That looks consistent with the English and German rules; I would assume the Dutch is the mistake, that they meant until each supply has four cards/tiles. I would say the English and German ...


11

The new edition was released during Essen 2015. Information on it was readily available since summer 2015, although the game was still at a prototype state. In brief, the new version revolves around 3 major overhauls: Complete graphic redesign. While the older game did work, the cards and the player boards were rather dull. All cards in the new version have ...


10

According to the posters on this thread, the only changes between 1st and 2nd edition were cosmetic. Although one poster mentions slightly different wording on some of the wands. The differences between 2nd edition and 4th edition are noted on this thread. Cosmetic changes, including larger board, cards, plastic bits, and cardboard cutout characters. ...


8

Took some time to compare the rules, but man there's more than I thought. Some are more subtle, others are complete game changers. Here's a complete list (unless I missed any): Poor House US: costs 5 gold to build. EU: costs 0 gold to build. Removing characters US: First put down the face-down card, then the face-up cards. If needed, replace the king ...


6

I don't have my two sets in front of me to give a direct card-by-card comparison (I can do that later if desired), but here's roughly the differences between the two sets. The original edition of CotDP has 'Barred from X' cards, where X is a neighborhood. An Investigator gets one of those, they can't go into the relevant neighborhood until the terror level ...


4

Cheapass Games did a fair bit of retooling the game. The core is the same, but the mix of cards and costs is a bit different, and they've also altered the rules: Ante used to include filling the Pot (for general play) and the Bank (a prize for whoever won the city game). The Bank has been eliminated, and the game works with just the Pot and the 500 franc ...


4

It depends on how you define "variations" of the game. At this moment the monopoly wiki has 1144 versions of the game, but it includes fictional editions (Monopoly Capitol City Edition from the Simpsons), predecessors (The Landlord's Game), and so on.


3

There are differences between all three editions - what they are exactly I do not know From the Board Game Geek page, your first image appears to be the 2017 edition, while the second image is the 2014 edition. The third image is listed as the "English/French first edition (2013)". I found a thread called Which version to buy asking about the different ...


3

I believe the board art is also different and that's worth mentioning because if you buy the In the lab expansion you will end up with distinct board styles even purchasing the new cards.


3

BGO Developer Nicholas Vlaada and the rest of his team wrote a detailed list of all the changes, along with his rationale, which has been reprinted on Board Game Geek. In short, it's a lot of rebalancing and changes to the way that certain actions work, but it is largely the same game as before.


3

It appears that the majority of the game mechanics are the same, except for the addition of a two-player variant. The major additions are new cards featuring more of the new Dr. Who universe, which themselves feature different abilities. The 1st edition covers only the Eleventh Doctor (Matt Smith), whereas the 2nd edition expands this to the 9th-12th ...


3

After quite a bit of searching (and an e-mail to Andy Looney, creator of Chrononauts), I was able to piece together the following: Chrononauts First Printing While this was the initial release, it did feature a number of art changes from the beta version, notably the beta card back was replaced with the one used in all subsequent editions. Chrononauts ...


3

I was about to answer this, but Tynan's answer is so much better. Several sites have histories of the games and their changes. I only list it here for completeness sake, in case you were wondering about particular changes in card wording, artwork, and alien races available. http://cosmicencounter.daveola.com/Versions/ http://cosmicencounter.wikia.com/


2

I can't answer your question directly, but I'm going to guess they're different, based on the redesign information. However, it may not matter. This looks like the 3rd edition blanks pack you're looking for. The release date is October 2012, the same as the 3rd edition release.


2

I assume that by "4th edition" you mean "revised 4th edition" as it's the most recent version and differs substantially from its non-revised predecessor. Talisman was always a very random game with many effects depending on the die roll. To somewhat counteract this, revised 4th edition introduced the Fate stat. Spending a Fate point allows you to reroll 1 ...


2

I played the new version earlier this summer. I had not played the original in more than a decade but game play was pretty much the same. The new boards and cards were beautiful, though. Some of the playable characters from the original were missing (the elf is one I can remember off the top of my head). Still, given a choice, I would definitely play the ...


2

Here is a pretty detailed and somewhat graphical rundown of the differences among editions, including comprehensive lists of which version has which aliens, organized both by edition and by alien name. Cosmodex Appendix C on Boardgame Geek


2

General Changes The following rules were added to the game (source): Hand limit: 12 cards. At the end of the turn (after the powerup phase), discard down to 12 cards if you have more. There's no limit to hand size during the rest of the turn. Normal draw rule: If your normal attack is blocked or wins combat, draw a card. (this helps to encourage some early ...


2

Artwork and the following. The Prefecture now costs 4 instead of 3. With the Goldmine, you now get to keep the cheapest card instead of any card. With the Guildhall, you get 1 point per production building and 1 point for each different production building. New building Hut: "In the trader phase, the owner of a hut draws one card from the supply if no good ...


2

I agree with @Cascabel's comment: apparently you read a review for the 2008 version (which is made completely from sturdy cardboard). If you haven't done so already, check out all the different versions at boardgamegeek and see which versions you can get your hands on. Here's a summary of the major versions I know and/or would consider: 2016: Haven't ...


2

Has 40k lost a lot of its customization and character options? Yes and no. In Matched play your options are much more limited, but in Open, and to a lesser extent Narrative play whatever your opponent agrees to is fine! Are the expected codices supposed to give more options/customization? We hope so, but there isn't any definitive word on this. Can I ...


2

New features of the newer version: extra roles (+1 vampire +1 investigator) and rules for 2 extra players (which I find interesting) card border is white instead of black (which I like, wear&tear will show later than with the black borders) tokens for roles and seances (which I don't like as it can be prone to wear&tear) larger box with insert (...


1

A city can be scored once per player, so in the given example, each player would receive 3 points. I found the answer while combing through some threads on boardgamegeek.com, as well as in an answer to this other question. From the other answer: A player can score for a single city one time, and only one time... no matter how many fields and farmers he ...


1

Consensus at BoardGameGeek seems to be: My impression from all of the people who have actually commented after receiving the expansion is that one can play just fine with the original base game as long as one is willing to tolerate some minor inconsistencies. Apparently the size of cards differ between 1st ed and the expansions, but that can be remedied ...


1

Since you can make-your-own-opoly, there are effectively infinite Monopoly variations.


1

Assuming everything else in the rules is the same as the English translation (i.e. you adding cards to your hand ends your turn), it would make no sense to also "restock your hand to four cards from the supply". So, in agreement with others, I think the Dutch must have a mistranslation.


1

AA guns tend to reduce the value of "strategic" bombing. Hence you would do this more (and spend more researching heavy bombers) than in other versions of the game. There are many players that believe that heavy bombers unbalance the game, and one should not be allowed to research them. If they are disallowed, AA guns would be less necessary, and can be ...


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