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22

Playing cards in such a way as to not accurately reflect your hand is perfectly fine - as long as that's actually what you're doing. There are plenty of hands where you're on defense and you know that partner is pretty much worthless; you're defending 3NT, partner knows your long suit, and you have 14 points anyway and expect partner to be in the lead ...


9

Is it ethical? Sure, and it's done all the time (for real bridge reasons, see Joe's answer). It is not required to help declarer when it won't help partner. What's not ethical is telling the opponents your signalling method, and then having it not be. "We play standard carding" is not the same as "we agreed standard carding but since my ...


5

First: I'm speaking sanctioned duplicate bridge. What happens in the rubber clubs is out of my experience; the Laws are different, and obviously when money is on the line, different things are ethical or unethical. To answer your title: yes. Because the ethics of the game are fully defined by the Proprieties (which were moved from "guidelines" to actual ...


4

Let's look at the relevant Bridge Laws. Law 16B1 says: Any extraneous information from partner that might suggest a call or play is unauthorized.This includes remarks, questions, replies to questions, unexpected alerts or failures to alert, unmistakable hesitation, unwonted speed, special emphasis, tone, gesture, movement or mannerism. (a) A player may not ...


3

If your partner knows your psyching tendencies, then they have become an implicit agreement that has to be disclosed to your opponents. If, in certain situations, your psychs are frequent enough that partner starts worrying about it, he or she should alert the bid and say "Frequently a psych" or something similar. (In some bridge jurisdictions, bidding ...


3

As you say, whatever you do, be consistent. Good contract, bad contract, plays itself, requires incredibly careful play, whatever. If you do not do that, the opponents know. Yes, sometimes that leads to some fun, after say 3C-X-p-p; p and partner dropping a 4=4=5=0 four count and hearing "thank you partner, nice hand" from declarer. But just ...


2

It's very hard to psych ethically. Making any bid that is outside of your agreements should be exceedingly rare, because otherwise you'll nearly inevitably have some implicit partnership agreements related to it - as you note, psyching only when behind, for example. I've known pairs that included one member that fairly often psyched, and they nearly always ...


2

There are two issues with this pause: it's too long just in general, with a timing issue (but I would caution people that my "I thought for 15 seconds" is the opponents' "it was 2 minutes" was probably actually closer to 35-40 seconds) "hesitation with a singleton" is frequently a problem especially not at trick 1 (as Tom says, ...


1

On the opening trick, a "pause" is justified, even when a player has no problems because of the forced play of a singleton. That's because everyone ought to be spending time to study the dummy. Thus should not take place at the second trick, although an inexperienced player may be excused for doing on the second trick what should have been done on ...


1

Once dummy's hand is laid down, there is no restriction on declarer's speech as far as hiding information goes, as dummy is a non-participant in play beyond turning over cards at Declarer's behest. Thus, declarer is welcome to thank, or not thank, dummy however they wish, following other guidelines and reasonable decorum. Of course, dummy is still ...


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