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53

It's common in all trick-based card games; since your 'move' is forced (you have to play the only card you're still holding), you're not giving away information to your opponents (or your teammate). By just playing your card the very moment the second-to-last trick is taken, you speed up the game. Players who do this know who is in the lead; the player who ...


8

An Alternative Method Most players will learn when to bid by feel, but for those who are not yet at that point or prefer something more concrete, you can assign a score to your hand, in order to determine whether you should bid. Some players use a 3-2-1 point system, with the bowers worth 3 points each, face trumps worth 2 points each, and low trumps or ...


7

Edit: the original question had two potential methods, one of which was correct and one of which was not. For posterity, here are the two methods, paraphrased from the original question. Method one (correct): 5 cards are chosen without replacement and without the order mattering from a deck of 24 (9, 10, J, Q, K, A in four suits). Then a sixth card is ...


6

Officially play does not begin until the dealer has discarded. (take the following quote with a grain of salt, there are tons of euchre variants and home rules that may contradict this). http://www.euchrelinks.com/rules.html XIII. If the eldest-hand leads before the dealer has discarded, he cannot withdraw his card and change his lead, nor can the ...


6

Your partner should ALWAYS lead trump to your call in third chair. The failure of so many online players to do this reflects a lack of understanding of the game. If you called it with the Right, then their low trump effectively gives the maker the lead and control of the hand. If you called without the Right, then your partner is helping flush the top ...


5

I have always interpreted the renege penalty as being generally 2 points because that's the maximum the opponents could have gained from the hand. In a loner hand, the maximum the makers can get is 4 points, so I would penalize a renege on with 4 points. Some sources: On the Ohio Euchre page the renege rule says: RENEGE: - There are no exceptions to the ...


5

This is a house rule. I have seen it played in informal games, but never among serious players. Once, I saw a person try to declare "ace, no face" in a $5 game. Since this person shared information about their hand it was ruled that they should be bumped and forfeit 2 points even though no cards had been played. All of the spectators and other players ...


3

Assuming a Euchre deck with 24 cards (9, 10, J, Q, K, A of each suit, no joker) and perfect shuffling, the chance that the 21st card in the deck (the card that gets turned up) is a particular card is 1/24. Thus, if you play 4 deals, there is a (1/24)^4 = 1/331776 = 0.0003% that all four deals will turn up the Jack of Spades. There's much higher chance of all ...


3

According to both the Bicycle Card Company Rules and the EuchreLinks.Com website Rulee only the person actually naming the trump denomination, termed the maker, has the option of going alone. Playing Alone If the player who fixes the trump suit believes it will be to his side's advantage to play without the help of his partner's cards, the player exercises ...


3

You must make the assumption your partner made trumps because he holds the higher trumps in his hand, and that you and your partner together have a majority of the trumps. So, you lead trumps to take advantage of this. If your partner has the right, that's good because you remove trumps from your opponents' hands, and get the trick. Now it's more likely an ...


3

This is a hypergeometric distribution problem. Luckily, calculators exist that let you just plug in the numbers and get an answer. I used this one with Population size = 24 (the size of the deck) Number of successes in population = 4 (the total number of kings) Sample size = 5 (the number of cards in your hand) Number of successes in sample = 3 (the ...


3

In a friendly game, where the extra card didn't give any important information (such as playing an ace that the bidder would otherwise not have known where it was), I'd just pick it up and continue play. Tournament rules should have something to cover this scenario, but a reasonable penalty in this case seems to be forcing the bidder to play with their ...


3

Wikipedia has rules for 8- and 9-person Euchre (along with a host of other variations), although we have to make some assumptions because the entries are missing some information. The entry for 8-person games: The players divide into four teams of two players. Teammates should be sitting directly across the table from each other (there should be three ...


3

I arrived at the same answers as tttppp, but I used more combinations and counting, so maybe it might help you understand the intuition behind it a little more. To reiterate, a combination C(n, x) tells you how many ways you can arrange n objects from a set (or group) of x objects, where the order doesn't matter. So if you have elements a, b, c, a ...


3

There are many variables and unknowns here. That said, the fact that the initial card was turned over by the dealer and no one had ordered it up provides a great deal of information. You say you called the suit and have the lead and the right bower... What was the rank of the card turned over? Was it a jack? An Ace? A nine? Now... was the suit you ...


2

First, I had no idea that Euchre had a point system (with regard to the value of each card in the deck). I played in college and I found that, more important than a strict strategy on how to play a certain hand, is to learn the habits of your opponents. I realize this is not novel considering card games. But with Euchre it becomes even more important, ...


2

I would have to agree with you. A previous game definitely has nothing to do with the proceeding game. It is equivalent to playing a game then a few years later the winner is still able to be the dealer without the blackjack deal (well maybe not quite that far, but you get the point). But just clarifying we are talking about entirely new games, not rounds? ...


2

You could also think of it like this, using combinations. Recall that a combination C(x, n) tells you the number of ways you could arrange n objects from a set of size x where order doesn't matter. So if you have 10 books, C(10, 3) tells you the number of ways you could select 3 of them. There are 4 Kings in a Euchre deck, and 24 total cards. So there are C(...


2

From here: It is common knowledge that third seat is one of the weakest positions to make a successful call. It typically requires having two or more sure tricks in the maker's hand. The thing seldom talked about is the partner's role in accomplishing the task. One of the essential requirements for a third seat call is the maker's ability to control trump. ...


2

Your side named the trump suit by ordering up; and then scored the requisite three tricks for making contract. Your side scores just a single point. As noted in the referenced question: Your opponent, the Dealer, had no basis for the claim of going alone. Your opponent's claim of best card from partner's hand is doubly unsupported: It is not part of the ...


1

The odds of turning up a given card that occurs once in the deck are 1 in N, where N is the size of the deck. Since you say the shuffles were all good, this means the trials are all independent. So the odds of it happening four times are (1/N)^4 If N is 24, this comes out to 1 in 331776. If N is 32, this comes out to 1 in 1048576. If you don't restrict it to ...


1

1 in 6. Since you're asking about the the possibility of four clubs in another hand, I'll go ahead and state the unstated assumption: you mean that you don't have any clubs other than the Jack and Ten in your hand. 9,T,J,Q,K,A in four suits: 24 cards Six cards dealt each player: 24 cards To figure the odds, counts the number of ways to deal what you see and ...


1

Most Euchre rules leave it the opponent (you in this case) to call the renege. They don't explicitly identify it as optional, but neither do the penalty sections go on to say what to do if you don't call it (i.e., there's no penalty for not calling a renege). For instance, from these rules: the opposing team is rewarded two points if it is caught and ...


1

I can't see anyway that this would, or even could, be a winning strategy. The odds of going alone and taking all 5 tricks cannot be more than about 10%. If we estimate the chance of Dealer's side making all 5 tricks as about 15%, and of being euchred as say 15%, then Dealer's side's point expectation is: 4 * 0.10 = + 0.40 2 * 0.15 = + 0.30 -2 * 0.15 = - 0....


1

I can see two clear situations where a trump lead appeals: Holding a stiff Ace or Bower; or Holding length (3 or more) I would lead my smallest. The first case should allow the partnership to play the remaining 4 tricks more effectively, with partner possibly still on lead to develop a possible side trick in his own hand. The second case is one where any ...


1

Once the hand is closed the renege is much harder to verify, once the cards played that round have been returned to the deck. A renege should be called immediately when it is noticed. Taken tricks should be kept separate from each other, organised so the order they were taken is clear, this allows a renege to be verified and not rely on everyone's memory.


1

No. Only the player that decides what trump is has the option to go alone. For your partner to go alone, you would have needed to pass, and your opponent would also need to pass. Its also worth noting that the term ordering up is only in the first round of deciding trump, when there is a card face up that the dealer will pick up when they are ordered to. ...


1

Three person Euchre is definitely a real thing and there are ten different ways to play it, according to Wikipedia. They pretty much all rely on: Setting extra cards aside as a dummy hand (more rarely, removing cards from the deck or adding cards to the kitty) Having players keep track of points individually, since they don't have a consistent partner (if ...


1

1) Any three Trump are worth bidding. Even if you have the three lowest Trump are three suited and have no Aces or Jacks. You won't stop anything with a hand like that. If you pass your opponent will either call it and likely make their point, as you can't help your partner euchre them. Conversely, your partner can call it and their likelihood of getting ...


1

TO improve at Euchre, play a game that makes even greater demands on your strategic thinking, and play technique. Playing Bridge I have seen my Euchre level rise as my capability at Bridge increased, but playing any of 9-5-2, Whist, Hearts, Pinochle and many others (along with Euchre as well, naturally) will improve your play. As one example, learning when ...


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