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23 votes
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In two-player games with perfect information, if both players play optimally, will the game always end in a draw?

Accurding to Zermelo's theorem, in finite two-player games of perfect information in which the players move alternately and no affect of chance, one of those three possibilities is true: First player ...
Cohensius's user avatar
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16 votes
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Is it correct to infer a second, third etc place in board games with a score?

Tl;dr: Players' meta-goals do affect gameplay. And unless all players have the same goals, the entire concept of "best player" isn't well defined, let alone "second best", etc. First a bit of game-...
Benjamin Cosman's user avatar
15 votes

Does Magic the Gathering need an independent arbiter for reliable detection of cheating?

Yes, but only to verify deck legality During play, all printed cards (un-sets excluded, along with online-only cards) are worded in such a way that their effects can be verified by other players. ...
Tim C's user avatar
  • 674
11 votes

Does Magic the Gathering need an independent arbiter for reliable detection of cheating?

Within the rules, the game does not need an arbiter. Cheating is another matter. The rules of the game, together with the card designs, make sure that cards whose abilities affect the game state or ...
Hackworth's user avatar
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8 votes

In two-player games with perfect information, if both players play optimally, will the game always end in a draw?

No - there need not always be a tie in the general case. Even in games of perfect complete information there may still be a bias towards one player. For example the game of nim cannot end in a tie, ...
tttppp's user avatar
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7 votes

How did makers of "Gwent" set scores for each card?

Playtesting. Playtesting. More playtesting. And then once you're done with that, some more playtesting. Any TCG which is complicated enough to be interesting for human players is far too complicated ...
Philip Kendall's user avatar
5 votes
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Identify this game with 4 players, each have 2 choices

This is what game theory would term a 4-player symmetric game. Based on the payoff matrix, it seems most similar to being a 4-player version of Chicken (A.K.A. Hawk-Dove). The key to Chicken is that ...
Zags's user avatar
  • 17.8k
3 votes

Does Magic the Gathering need an independent arbiter for reliable detection of cheating?

Magic the Gathering has Judges, I'm one of them. No we don't watch the whole of every game, that would mean one judge for every two players and is just not possible when you have hundreds or thousands ...
Andrew's user avatar
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3 votes
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Are games like Alquerque solved? Are they fair games with perfect play?

While I cannot find a formal proof, Alfonso X's "Libro de los Juegos" offers an anecdotal report that the solution to the game is a tie: if both players known how to play it, they can both ...
Zags's user avatar
  • 17.8k
2 votes

Early game bidding as Greyjoy

The answer to this question will be very heavily dependent on your group, and their groupthink. In my experience, often bidding 3 on the blade would not result in getting it (I would probably be 2nd ...
Hal's user avatar
  • 664
1 vote

In two-player games with perfect information, if both players play optimally, will the game always end in a draw?

You are missing a couple of important factors in your question that make it impossible to answer as it stands. Mainly that a game with perfect information available to both players doesn't mean that ...
Joe W's user avatar
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1 vote

Is it correct to infer a second, third etc place in board games with a score?

In a game where there is a scoring function, one can always rank players beyond the winner into 2nd, 3rd, etc. The real question is whether positions beyond first have any value. That question ...
Zags's user avatar
  • 17.8k

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