7

According to the accepted answer on the post containing that number, it originates in the book How to Win at Gin Rummy: Playing for Fun and Profit by Pramod Shankar. Unfortunately, the book doesn't seem to have a source or proof for it. Thankfully, though, a comment on that post does give an answer. A blog called Entropy Clay steps through the calculations, ...


6

It is important to note that knocking and going gin are not mutually exclusive. From Pagat: Knocking with no unmatched cards at all is called going gin [...] And Wikipedia: Knocking with 0 points of deadwood is known as going Gin or having a Gin hand [...] If you announced a zero count, then you have gone gin. If you announced a non-zero count, then ...


5

Same player deals again. From thesprucecrafts If only two cards remain in the draw pile after a player discards and neither player has knocked, the round ends in a draw and the same player deals again.


5

The sequence of play should be: You knock You announce your count (or gin) You can do this silently by laying down your cards organized with the extras clearly off to the side in an unmatched group. Your opponent lays out there hand, laying off on your cards if you didn't gin. The important questions are then - Did you announce a count? Did your ...


4

Your opponent gets 25 points plus 0 points. You do not get a chance to undercut. According to Pagat: A player who goes gin can never be undercut. You do not get a gin bonus because you did not declare gin. You don't have a chance to declare gin because play ended. Play ended because your opponent knocked. Again from Pagat, emphasis mine: You can end ...


4

The most common way of betting money on Gin Rummy (according to this site) is to choose a rate per point (say $1) that the loser pays the winner - e.g. if you lose 70 to 220, you pay $150. When you're playing for money, there's probably an approximate stake you want to play for - smaller stakes will feel trivial (who wants to win one penny?) but larger ...


3

Here's one answer from http://ginrummytournaments.com/pdfs/Rules_2012.pdf. Tl;dr if you could have knocked then you can accept his knock and undercut; otherwise game continues, he plays an open hand, and he must knock at first opportunity. IMPROPER KNOCK: If a player makes an IMPROPER KNOCK, with his count being higher than the knock card, his hand must ...


3

Gin-Rummy has many scoring variantions. As Andrew suggested in a comment, Paget is a good source for rules of card games. From Paget: Some people play that the bonus for going gin is 25 (rather than 20) and the bonus for an undercut is 20 (rather than 10). Some play that the bonus for an undercut, the bonus for going gin, and the box bonus for ...


2

Sounds like you've already found the answer: it's a form of contract rummy, just with a different final contract than the one listed on the Wiki entry. From the contract rummy entry on rummy-games.com : The rules detailed below are representative of all Contract Rummy games, though there are numerous regional and local variations even among games ...


2

Three Independent sources counted about 136,694 Gin hands, out of 15.8B possible 10-cards hands. 2+2 forum post: 1 in ~118,000. Using brute force which checked for Gin each of the 15.8B hands. Rulemonger's analysis: 136,694 in 15,820,024,220 or 1 in ~115733 How to Win at Gin Rummy: 1 in ~117,000, according to the book How to Win at Gin Rummy: Playing for ...


1

EDIT: this count is flawed, it doesn't recognize sets of three that include a spade. The correct number is given in the accepted answer. When the code is corrected, it gives the 136,694 unique gin hands, matching the accepted answer. Original: 1 in 308,984, according to Andrew Inwood's analysis, which includes source code.


1

I modified that program by Andrew Inwood to count them (including all the three-of-a-kinds, still), and it finds 5,379,372 11-card hands that contain a 10-card gin hand. Out of C(52,11) hands, that makes the odds about 1 in 11,228 or 0.00891%


1

Possible, but unlikely. It means that your opponent chose to discard when he had Gin. There is no good reason to do this. Other explanations: If both players are dealt a gin hand (very rare). A misclick. An opponent that do not know the rules. A bad AI agent. In games where the Undercut bonus is larger than the Gin bonus then in some rare cases it might ...


1

The standard 13 Card Rummy suggests you're OK to look to 13 as the basis of your pattern, yes. For Gin, I'd say you have it right: hands should be 4 + 3*k cards for some positive integer k. 11 is conceivable, but strikes me as too confining. When adjusting the hand size, you should also adjust the point limit barrier to knock. Since it's 10 points for a 10-...


1

Various sites (e.g., rummyculture) list rummy variants with jokers, but not Gin Rummy specifically. But the rules could be adapted directly. Suggested set of rules: Jokers are worth 30, as in most versions of Rummikub Discarded jokers cannot be picked up from the discard pile (optional) Jokers can be used in sets or runs, but not to make a 5-card set (the "...


1

Pagat says the first player cannot go back and take the face up card but must draw from the stock: If both players refuse the turned-up card, the non-dealer draws the top card from the stock pile. It seems to be the common rule. Wiki, Spruce Crafts, WikiHow all agree


1

From Rummy-Talk: When to Knock, Play for Gin, or Underknock Knock, under most conditions, should be utilized at the first opportunity, with a few exceptions: When the odds are in favor of your going out in a game, or obtaining enough score to catch up to your opponent. When it is a reasonable assumption on your part that you stand to be ...


1

I have played Gin often with my family, at least several hundred rounds. I do not recall ever having participated in a game which ended in a draw. I will note that I have primarily participated in two-player games, logic indicates that games with additional players would have a higher probability of ending in a draw as there would be fewer rounds per player ...


1

You are not forced to "correctly" play the 6c, actually sometimes (rarely) it is an expert move to discard a card that is part of a meld. For example, assume you knock while holding the run {3c,4c,5c,6c} and you know that your opponent is holding the 7c and 8c. by discarding the 6c you deny your opponent a layoff of 15 points. From RummyTalk, which is ...


1

In Gin, you do get some hard information on what is in your opponent's hand and constantly need to add some intelligent guesses on what is probably the opponent's hand. Hard information: A pickup from the discard by the opponent - surely that opponent hold this card. Probably this card is a part of a Meld or at least a combination. Your hand & discard ...


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