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68 votes
Accepted

Is "Adversarial Policies Beat Professional-Level Go AIs" simply wrong?

One of the authors of the paper here. It might shock you to find that I believe the paper was not "simply wrong". I do however think that we did a poor job explaining our evaluation setting, ...
Adam Gleave's user avatar
33 votes
Accepted

Why doesn't a go board have an 'I' ('i') column?

Zeiss isn't completely correct, this is actually the less common reason for omitting the I. The more common reason why I is often omitted where it would normally be expected between H and J is because ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 14.3k
22 votes

Why don’t you capture more territory in Go?

Suppose there is a black stone in the corner but it is impossible for black to survive, no matter how well played. By convention, both sides recognize this and the black stone is counted as a prisoner....
Ray Butterworth's user avatar
21 votes

Is there an equivalent of Deep Blue in the Go world?

AlphaGo Now there is AlphaGo by Deep Mind, a company recently bought by Google playing currently a match against 9p Lee Sedol. It is the Deep Blue of Go. EDIT: The final result of the match of five ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
20 votes

Go: Why did I lose? How is territory defined?

5x5 boards are actually harder to understand than a little bit larger board. There are a lot of weird situations that can happen because the board is so small, so I would recommend starting with 9x9 ...
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,468
19 votes
Accepted

What are the differences between Chinese and Japanese rules in Go?

In most games (as already noted) the two rulesets produce the same strategy and outcome. Differences between the current Japanese and Chinese rules: Japanese counts enclosed territory (of groups able ...
benjimin's user avatar
  • 306
19 votes
Accepted

Why is this tsumego solution wrong?

In tsumegos where you should kill a group, the best (and thus correct) answer is always the solution where you kill unconditionally (if possible). Only if there is no unconditional kill the ko would ...
havogt's user avatar
  • 416
19 votes

Why doesn't a go board have an 'I' ('i') column?

In most cases, where "I" is omitted between "H" and "J", it's to avoid confusion with number "1". It's also common to omit the letter "O" for the same reason (confusion with number "0", more of a ...
Zeiss Ikon's user avatar
  • 1,687
18 votes
Accepted

In this Go position, can black capture the entire length of the white arm?

Yes. That white chain has only two liberties - A and the space next to A. If black fills both of them the chain will be captured. None of the surrounding black stones are vulnerable to capture ...
Arcanist Lupus's user avatar
15 votes

In this Go position, can black capture the entire length of the white arm?

Yes, but Black doesn't need to. Since each of the surrounding groups already have two eyes, there's no reason to play those stones. In fact, it will cost Black two points in Japanese scoring. If ...
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,468
15 votes

Is "Adversarial Policies Beat Professional-Level Go AIs" simply wrong?

Regardless of the validity of this particular strategy, the general technique seems quite valid. They did not simply discover a bug in KataGo and then write a program to exploit the bug. Rather, they ...
user253751's user avatar
14 votes
Accepted

How do I chose invasion or reduction points?

First off, count the current score. If you're winning, do not invade. Just make sure you keep white small enough that you still win. Let use further presume that black would be losing. You counted, ...
mafu's user avatar
  • 7,012
13 votes

Why are Elo ratings for go higher than for chess?

There is no ELO rating in go. And even no official international rating at all. A common question in go forums is "how does my rating in [whatever country or online server] compare with [other country ...
Christophe's user avatar
  • 1,081
12 votes
Accepted

How much of AlphaGo's success is due to novelty?

I would argue that AlphaGo's advantage cannot be significantly attributed to the novelty of its moves. The original public AlphaGo games were those against Lee Sedol, the second ranked player in the ...
murgatroid99's user avatar
  • 81.8k
12 votes

Who won this match of Go?

Summary You needed to finish the game, after which, assuming optimal play, White would have won by a very large margin (if it was their turn next) or a large margin (if it was Black’s turn). The ...
PJTraill's user avatar
  • 1,418
11 votes
Accepted

How does AlphaGo calculate?

Here's the AlphaGo team's paper that has all of the details (behind a paywall): http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v529/n7587/full/nature16961.html I gave a couple of tech talks about this recently....
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,468
11 votes
Accepted

What's the longest possible forced repetition in Go?

Molasses ko: http://denisfeldmann.fr/bestiary3.htm#mol "The semeai in figure 11 is probably the worst known case of repetition. Known as "molasses ko", ..." Denis Feldmann's Go Bestiary is a ...
Olivier Dulac's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

In Go can you put a counter in a place that had a prisoner

After a piece and/or group is completely out of liberties, it is removed immediately. The only rule that would really prevent you from placing a stone back on the captured space is the ko rule, in ...
goldPseudo's user avatar
  • 6,692
11 votes

Is it possible to live with false eyes, only?

Yes, this is possible. It requires the living group to circle back on itself like this: $$Bcm0 $$ ............ $$ ...OOOOOO... $$ ..OOXXXXOO.. $$ .OOX.XX.XOO. $$ .OX.XOOX.XO. $$ .OXXO.OOXXO. $$ ....
cmaster - reinstate monica's user avatar
11 votes

Is "Adversarial Policies Beat Professional-Level Go AIs" simply wrong?

In the Tromp–Taylor rules, the concept of dead stones is left out—all stones on the board at the end of the game are treated as being alive. The KataGo AI was trained primarily using the Tromp–Taylor ...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
10 votes

Do Go players play to minimize score difference after realizing they cannot win?

In general, if you realize that you can't win, you should resign. It's considered rude to make plays that will only allow you to catch up if your opponent makes a stupid mistake. I don't think Go ...
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,468
10 votes
Accepted

Why do asymmetric ko fights exist?

I think the easiest way to think of this is in terms of options, and the freedom to take whatever options benefit me. In your example, you have no options: You need to win this ko, or you will lose. ...
goldPseudo's user avatar
  • 6,692
10 votes
Accepted

Why do player start with fighting for the corners in go?

Common starting practices are to open by placing stones on a Hoshi (4-4 point), or close to it, in order to "claim" that corner. As the players are trying to secure as much area as they can, it makes ...
TheThirdMan's user avatar
  • 9,156
10 votes
Accepted

Is there more than one solution to this problem about cutting in go

Your idea does keep the stones connected, but it isn't as good as the correct answer. $$W $$ ------------------ $$ . . . . . . . .| $$ . . 1 . . . . .| $$ . O X 2 B . . .| $$ . O O X . X . .| $$ ...
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,468
10 votes

Go: Why did I lose? How is territory defined?

Territory is a conceptual shortcut, not fundamental Motivation The fundamental idea of Go is to get your stones onto the board and keep them there. The first question you should ask yourself is: what ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar
9 votes

Why are Elo ratings for go higher than for chess?

There are three determining factors for how high the highest Elo rating for a given game will be: Internal aspects of the rating system: First an foremost how the ratings are initialised. If you ...
BlindKungFuMaster's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Do Go players play to minimize score difference after realizing they cannot win?

Sadly I do not have a reliable source for this answer, but as far as I know, continuing when clearly behind is not generally considered rude, at least at professional level. One reasoning was that it ...
mafu's user avatar
  • 7,012
9 votes
Accepted

Go Surrounding Rules

The game is incomplete. Literally nothing is "surrounded" here, and if the game ended in such a state nobody would get any points at all until you can mutually agree on which groups are "dead" and ...
goldPseudo's user avatar
  • 6,692
9 votes
Accepted

Why do we surround the corner in go?

It's entirely a question of efficiency: It simply takes fewer stones to secure more territory if you play in the corner. Taking, for example, the eleven stones White plays in your sample game, if ...
goldPseudo's user avatar
  • 6,692
8 votes

End game deciding on dead stones

As TimK pointed out, the situation could be but may not be a Seki but without a diagram to show to us, it's not easy for us to guess what happened. Seki : no one die, everyone live $$cm1 $$ +--------...
Kii's user avatar
  • 475

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