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21 votes

Go: Why did I lose? How is territory defined?

5x5 boards are actually harder to understand than a little bit larger board. There are a lot of weird situations that can happen because the board is so small, so I would recommend starting with 9x9 ...
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,488
10 votes

Go: Why did I lose? How is territory defined?

Territory is a conceptual shortcut, not fundamental Motivation The fundamental idea of Go is to get your stones onto the board and keep them there. The first question you should ask yourself is: what ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Go ending. Why do players stop?

This is anwered by 'gennan' here: Why players don’t try to occupy opponent’s territory with living group of stones at the end of a game? When using territory scoring (points for empty intersections ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
5 votes

Go: Why did I lose? How is territory defined?

Summary It would have been clearer to you if you had played on until the boundaries between Black and White were clearly defined. “Territory” means surrounded vacant points. Details Easier if you ...
PJTraill's user avatar
  • 1,468
4 votes

Go: Why did I lose? How is territory defined?

You have lost because a computer arbiter has decided that all the Black stones are dead. Therefore White controls the whole board and gets 25 points and Black gets 0 points. If this had been a human ...
Stef's user avatar
  • 397
3 votes

Go: Why did I lose? How is territory defined?

@TimK is right about why Black lost. How territory is defined -- a player's territory is that part of the board that the player exclusively controls, such that any opponent stones in that area will be ...
m_mlvx's user avatar
  • 316
3 votes
Accepted

How is this Go game scored?

This game isn't really finished - there are still moves available that gain points. If it's your turn, playing in the center and then extending upward if Black connects will capture at least the five ...
TimK's user avatar
  • 3,488
3 votes

Go ending. Why do players stop?

As Weather Vane explained, if you play in your opponents territory and your opponents responds with a move inside their territoy this is point neutral. This basic principle is used to resolve disputes ...
quarague's user avatar
  • 263
3 votes
Accepted

What does an equal odds Go game look like between a top human and top AI?

I found a recent life in 19x19 thread which had mentioned a KataGo result only in passing, but which received some notice. It seems that succeeding with a 3-stone handicap against a top-rated AI ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

How does black kill white in this Tsumego?

$$ |-------------- $$ | a O O c . . . $$ | 1 b O X X . . $$ | 2 O O X . X . $$ | X X X O X . . $$ | . . . O . . . $$ | . O O . . . . $$ | . . O . . . . $$ | . . . . . . . You are absolutely right ...
Stef's user avatar
  • 397
2 votes

How is this Go game scored?

This is an intriguing position. TimK already explained that a white move at F6 will capture 5 black stones and that this is not because black cannot save them, but because saving them would lead to ...
mafu's user avatar
  • 7,028
1 vote

Why don’t you capture more territory in Go?

why can't black just put a stone in upper left corner? Then white would lose one point. It does not work this way. In territory scoring, the captured stone counts for a point (which offsets the point ...
Karl Knechtel's user avatar

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