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32

Zeiss isn't completely correct, this is actually the less common reason for omitting the I. The more common reason why I is often omitted where it would normally be expected between H and J is because in sans serif fonts the uppercase "I" is completely identical to the lowercase "l" (L). In a go board if you see a move noted in uppercase as I6 or lowercase ...


19

In most cases, where "I" is omitted between "H" and "J", it's to avoid confusion with number "1". It's also common to omit the letter "O" for the same reason (confusion with number "0", more of a problem in some fonts than others).


10

Common starting practices are to open by placing stones on a Hoshi (4-4 point), or close to it, in order to "claim" that corner. As the players are trying to secure as much area as they can, it makes sense to start out in a place that is easily defended, and that is something that's true for corners more than for any other location on the board at the start ...


8

Yes, this is possible. It requires the living group to circle back on itself like this: $$Bcm0 $$ ............ $$ ...OOOOOO... $$ ..OOXXXXOO.. $$ .OOX.XX.XOO. $$ .OX.XOOX.XO. $$ .OXXO.OOXXO. $$ .OXXOO.OXXO. $$ .OX.XOOX.XO. $$ .OOX.XX.XOO. $$ ..OOXXXXOO.. $$ ...OOOOOO... $$ ............ Here, each of the eight black eyes is locally a false eye, but because ...


7

Four stones is an enormous handicap on a 9x9 board. With perfect play by Black, White probably can't make a living group. If you're taking four stones, you presumably aren't going to play perfectly. The main thing to do here is stay out of trouble. Connecting below 5 is a nice solid move. Playing to capture the two stones is fine, too. As long as you keep ...


7

Capturing territory around the edges of the board is simpler and quicker, because the edge forms a boundary which does not have to be constructed with stones, and which can not be attacked from "outside". Once a player has a safe territory attached to the edge, it can be extended towards the center of the board. It is also relevant that a border just three ...


7

Instead of S8, White can play T7. This may not work right away because White has some bad shape, but if he lets black crawl a few times - T5, S6, T6, S7, etc - and then blocks on the edge, the group doesn't gain any liberties. Like this: $$Bcm1 $$ |...,....., $$ |.......... $$ |.......... $$ |.XXX...... $$ |7OOOX..... $$ |9OXXOO.... $$ |.OXO....., $$ |....


6

Because you need less stones in the corner to live than in the center. And by extension, you can surround more area in the corner with the same number of stones. Some figures to visualize this: Live group in the corner, 6 stones: +------ |.xx.. |x.x.. |xx... |.... Live group in the middle, 10 stones: ...... .xx... .x.x.. .xx.x. ..xxx. ...... (See ...


6

As the right most eye does not have a solid chain it is still vulnerable. This combined white's coverage on 8 means that when white takes E8 white will easily be able to move E9 into atari; after E8 white's next move would be F9, G8 or G9, which black cannot effectively block within the available two moves.


6

Playing in the space above 82 would result in that black group having no liberties while the white groups surrounding it do still have liberties, so the group would immediately be captured by white. According to Wikipedia, most rulesets prohibit moves like that. If you play in the bottom right hole, on the other hand, that black group still has multiple ...


5

The White's are dead if the surrounding Black's are alive. The White's are two moves away from being captured by Black. White can make moves to prolong its dying but not prevent it.


5

There are a lot of possibilities for this opening. If you want the bottom space, you could take pincer move(around D) to cooperate with your corner D4; You also could take A to strengthen corner space and threaten to White(this move might better then B due to more threat on White); Take the open up-right corner also OK(corner is more valuable then side); C ...


4

Seems Black has to take the 1-2 vital point to avoid White making 2 eyes. If White begin to deprive Black's liberty from outside, then Black get connected by taking on 1-3 and White deprives outside again. After that, both Black and White have same 3 liberties, but 2 of them are in common used. This becomes seki and it should be the best result for White.


3

Just think about what happens when your stones get fully surrounded, as will eventually happen: The stone(s) at E9 will only retain a single liberty, the false eye, and you will need to fill that single liberty with a stone to connect E9 to the rest of the black group. And after that, only a single eye remains. That is the point of false eyes: They are ...


3

It is plain and simple that it is much easier and more efficient to make life groups and territory in the corners than along the edges or in the centre. In the corner, you need two outer walls, along the edge three, and in the center four to enclose your territory. And Go is about enclosing territory, after all.


2

The theoretical answer depends whose rules you are using, because different countries use different rules, and have different ways of dealing with the multi-ko1 situation you describe. In practice this almost never arises, and keeping track is usually easy, as something else happens to change the whole-board state, such as a move on a previously unoccupied ...


2

Super Ko can be detected efficiently using Zobrist hashing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zobrist_hashing https://www.gnu.org/software/gnugo/gnugo_11.html#SEC144 The idea is to pick a random 64-bit integer to represent each of the 2x19x19 = 722 positions on the board. The empty board has a hash value of 0. When you add a stone to the board you XOR the ...


2

The black group in the upper corner has two liberties, as does the main white group before you play that last piece. Therefore, if you had instead decided to play elsewhere on the board, white could have decided to capture the black group and done so before you could save it. With that final spot filled in, you are now guaranteed to capture the white ...


2

The Computer Go Server1 is currently a very active test bed for bots. The Computer Go page at Sensei’s Library refers, under Competitions, to various competitions including the Computer Go Server, with its own page at Sensei’s Library, which gives the URL1. On that site, you will find daily updated tables of bots for 9×9, 13×13 and 19×19, These refer to the ...


1

Edits: corrected my miscount of Black area, possible White gain If my calculations are right, you seem to have lost or won depending on the rules in force, but you had a chance in any case! Your score In your position, using area scoring, I count your central group as 40 points as follows: Counting in vertical pairs left to right two horizontal lines at a ...


1

I cannot tell you, what move is best, but here is how I (around 7k) think about it: $$Bcm4 $$ +---------+ $$ |.........| $$ |.........| $$ |..X...X..| $$ |.........| $$ |....,.2..| $$ |...c1Xa..| $$ |..X3OOX..| $$ |.....de..| $$ |.........| $$ +---------+ The white move at G5 is obviously a threat to cut at G4. I guess, that won't surprise you. The threat ...


1

Disclaimer I am about 7 kyu, and seldom play 9×9, so I defer to those with higher ranks or more experience. How would KataGo play? I asked KataGo, running as an engine for Sabaki, and this is what it thinks: The first image shows that it rates the connection at G4 as best, expecting you to win by ~60 points if you play there; the second shows how it ...


1

The previous answers assume Black connects at S3, but what happens when Black initially sacrifices four stones? White tries to kill everything ... $$Bcm1 $$ |...,....., $$ |.......... $$ |.......... $$ |.XXX...... $$ |9OOOX..... $$ |.OXXOO.... $$ |.OXO....., $$ |8OXOO2.... $$ |6X7X134... $$ |.XXX.5.... $$ +---------- and fails. White cannot play at ...


1

Short answer How can a ko fight be “asymmetric”? By offering one player a strong incentive to start it. When a ko is asymmetric You are right that once the ko is started, the result is equally valuable to both sides. Where the asymmetry comes in is when one player, considering whether to start the ko, compares three local outcomes: They start the ko and ...


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