Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

8

Common starting practices are to open by placing stones on a Hoshi (4-4 point), or close to it, in order to "claim" that corner. As the players are trying to secure as much area as they can, it makes sense to start out in a place that is easily defended, and that is something that's true for corners more than for any other location on the board at the start ...


7

For each intersection, ask yourself if it belongs to white or black. The issue with your examples is that the games are not finished yet. You should keep playing until you can answer the question above. For now let me just try and address the top right corner. In scenario 1, white is currently enclosing two intersections. But black will eventually capture ...


6

Capturing territory around the edges of the board is simpler and quicker, because the edge forms a boundary which does not have to be constructed with stones, and which can not be attacked from "outside". Once a player has a safe territory attached to the edge, it can be extended towards the center of the board. It is also relevant that a border just three ...


5

Instead of S8, White can play T7. This may not work right away because White has some bad shape, but if he lets black crawl a few times - T5, S6, T6, S7, etc - and then blocks on the edge, the group doesn't gain any liberties. Like this: $$Bcm1 $$ |...,....., $$ |.......... $$ |.......... $$ |.XXX...... $$ |7OOOX..... $$ |9OXXOO.... $$ |.OXO....., $$ |....


5

Under Chinese scoring (AKA area scoring), you can (and with new players should) play until each player has no move they can make. There is no downside under Chinese scoring for a player to play stones into untenable positions, nor is there downside for a player to defend a position inefficiently (so long as they don't fill in their eyes). As a result, a ...


4

There are a lot of possibilities for this opening. If you want the bottom space, you could take pincer move(around D) to cooperate with your corner D4; You also could take A to strengthen corner space and threaten to White(this move might better then B due to more threat on White); Take the open up-right corner also OK(corner is more valuable then side); C ...


4

Seems Black has to take the 1-2 vital point to avoid White making 2 eyes. If White begin to deprive Black's liberty from outside, then Black get connected by taking on 1-3 and White deprives outside again. After that, both Black and White have same 3 liberties, but 2 of them are in common used. This becomes seki and it should be the best result for White.


4

The number of stones for a board is meant to be effectively infinite. The typical procedure if players run out is to exchange captured stones in equal quantities and continue with them. This means that enough stones so that either player could completely fill the board is guaranteed to be enough stones.


4

Because you need less stones in the corner to live than in the center. And by extension, you can surround more area in the corner with the same number of stones. Some figures to visualize this: Live group in the corner, 6 stones: +----- |.xx |x.x |xx | Live group in the middle, 10 stones: xx x.x xx.x xxx (See Smallest Group with Two Eyes on Sensei's ...


3

N.B. The links to terms are for third parties, rather than the questioner, who as 7 kyu will already know them. Where she is now The best approach depends on the sort of person she is and what she hopes to get from playing go, so stay alert to any feelings, wishes and opinions she expresses. As Forget I was ever here’s answer says, I think you should find ...


3

It is plain and simple that it is much easier and more efficient to make life groups and territory in the corners than along the edges or in the centre. In the corner, you need two outer walls, along the edge three, and in the center four to enclose your territory. And Go is about enclosing territory, after all.


2

I decided to revisit this post with the help of Leela Zero. LZ's assessment is that there is no good move for black above the 11th line. The sequences are fascinating, here is the start of one: $$cm1 $$ +---------------------------------------+ $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . O . . . . . . . . 6 . | $$ | . . . . . . . O O ....


1

This seems like a much harder problem than it actually is. The key is the undecided territory. You know that you loose points when you play into your own territory (Japanese rules). You also loose points when you play into your opponents territory without requiring an answer. Consequently, virtually all moves go into undecided territory. Once the undecided ...


1

I would recommend to use Chinese scoring, where prisoners are given back to your opponent. Go is played on a 19x19 board and comes with 181 black stones and 180 white stones. This is to accommodate filling every spot on the board with a stone. Think about this: you'll never fill every spot in a game of go. Also, technically it is possible that one ...


1

I think you could follow the same formula you've listed for other boards and you will be fine. That is black gets half the square of the number of lines rounded up and white gets half the square of the number of lines rounded down. In a regular game you will not need more stones. That may not be true for go variants.


1

There are two logical places when to stop (with Japanese or European rules in mind): When there are only dame points to fill When all dame points are filled The score does not change between these two stages, there are just zero-point moves in between. I think 2 is easier to see and teach in the beginning, while in practical play passes occur when 1 is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible