Hot answers tagged

9

White Q19 is a mistake. The correct move is R18. Then Black can't connect at Q19 because the stones would still be in atari. $$c White survives! $$ --------- $$ ..63512.- $$ .XXOO4OO- $$ .XOXOOX.- $$ ..OXXX.X- $$ ......X.- $$ ........- After the capture, a and b are miai to make White a second eye. $$c Resistance is futile! $$ --------- $$ ..Oab.O.- $$ ....


7

I don't think it's that the joseki move is forcing, it's more that the joseki move is better. 5 here is pretty sad for White. For 4 to be joseki, you would need a response to this move that turns out better than the accepted sequence for White. $$ ---------- $$ ..........| $$ ..........| $$ ..3.2.....| $$ ..54..1...| $$ ..........|


5

Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't think that shape is alive. $$B $$ ---------------------------- $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $$ | . O 7 1 . . . . . . . . . . $$ | 4 . O X . . . . . . . . . . $$ | . 5 O X . . . . . , . . . . $$ | 6 2 X . . . . . . . . . . . $$ | . 3 . X . . . . . . . . . . $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $$ | . . . . . . . . . ....


5

The main reason why I think you think this is good is because this joseki looks a lot like another familiar 3-4 joseki: http://josekipedia.com/#path:qdodocncpcndqfjd $$ Good possibilities $$ --------------| $$ . . . . . . . | $$ . . . . . . . | $$ . X . X . . . | $$ . . . , X . . | $$ . . . O X . . | $$ . a . O O . . | $$ . . . . . . . | $$ . . . c b . . | $...


5

It is difficult to tell if the pincer at 3 was the right choice. Generally, such a wide pincer is good if you plan on a moyo on the right side. I'm assuming that W1 was in the upper left and B2 a hoshi in the lower right, as in this: $$Wcm1 $$ --------------------------------------- $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...


4

First of all, simply playing joseki does not mean the result will be even (or even good for you) on a given board. A joseki is a sequence that is considered as often optimal given a particular situation. If the situation changes, a joseki which was fine before might suddenly become a terrible choice. The situation depends on the whole board. In particular, ...


4

It seems to me that playing 3 and 'a' cuts the E15 stone from the F17 stone. $$Bcm1 $$ +---------- $$ |.......... $$ |.......... $$ |..1..O.... $$ |...X75...X $$ |...32..... $$ |..O46..... $$ |.......... $$ |.......... $$ |.......... $$ |...X.....,


3

The point is, that in this situation $$c $$ -------------------- $$ -. . . . . . . . . . $$ -. . . . . . . . . . $$ -. . X . c W . . . . $$ -. . . X b B . . . X $$ -. . . X W d . . . . $$ -. . O O a . . . . . $$ -. . . . . . . . . . $$ -. . . . . . . . . . $$ -. . . . . . . . . . $$ -. . . X . . . . . , the moves at b and c are miai: Either white allows ...


3

You should try to figure out what White is trying to do by "changing moves," as well as what White failed to do. White failed to prevent you from moving into the center (and outflanking him) with a. That is something you should consider doing. It connects your upper side to the upper left corner stone, (and makes both absolutely safe). In a seven stone game,...


3

Black's pincer is too close to White's stone (it should be at least one space lower). (This variation is not in the joseki books because it is not joseki.) That means that White can "lean on it while indirectly attacking Black's corner stone. White should play Q15,Black plays p15, White cuts with P14, threatening to make a ladder to capture stone 3, Black ...


3

1 and 2 are "honte" moves. They result in solid positions as they remove all aji from the marked stones, but are not mandatory. $$cm1 $$ +---------------------------------------+ $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . O O X X Q . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . B O X 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . | ...


2

That should be simple - don't play at 14 in your final diagram. Instead, try this: $$Bm7 $$ . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ . . . . . . . . O . . | $$ . . . . . . . B . . . | $$ . . . . . . . 7 X 5 . | $$ . . X . 8 . O 3 O 1 . | $$ . . . . . . . 6 4 2 . | $$ . . . . . . . . . . . | $...


2

I have never seen Black 5 in any joseki book, but I'm sure I've seen it in my games. Probably a typical amateur mistake :) However, I have no idea why it would be bad - it looks like a reasonable move to me, given the right circumstances. I will first comment on the sequence you gave, then I will show which alternatives I would consider, and finally I'll ...


2

In your shoes, I'd play e16 (atari), Black pulls out to d17, White, e17, threatening to capture two stones, Black c17, you f15 to "capture" the Black stone on f16. But that assumes that the top is the most important part of the board. If, in fact, the left side is more important, the way you outline is better.


2

Take a look at Kogo's Joseki Dictionary. It has several variations for this move - too many to show them here.


2

Actually, corner fighting (so-called Joseki), is still evolving. With AlphaGo and AlphaZero, and the latest other AIs such as FineArt, there's no final conclusion yet. So, to your question “what strategic purpose is served by tsuke-nobi, regardless of where White plays 4 (a/b/c/d)?” I would argue that, however White continues (a/b/c/d), Black can achieve an ...


2

Black at the 3-3 point is a special strategy that requires supporting stones in the area. In the fuseki, without supporting stones, black's objective is to separate white, with 3 main options: tsuke nobi against the pincer stone (your diagram) tsuke nobi against the pincered stone 5-5 point 38 Basic Joseki is an older book that favors the first option. In ...


2

W1 looks like a small mistake to me, if any. This move indirectly protects the cut at the right side, so the third line stone cannot be cut off easily. It is, however, not strongly connected. White needs to be flexible, in case the naive result (the 3 stone group) is too dangerous. $$B $$ ---------------------- $$ |...................| $$ |.....................


2

When White hanes at 10, you need to play 11 at 13, then connect after he does. You cannot answer a contact move with a non-contact move in this situation (and most others).


1

The joseki This is, as mafu pointed out, the result of a joseki starting with high and low near kakaris against a hoshi, shown in 38 Basic Joseki, page 188, Dia. 4 (with colours swapped and rotated to match the question), and in Josekipedia: $$Wc Double kakari joseki $$ ----------- $$ ..........- $$ ......c7b.- $$ a...X.54..- $$ O...9.O6..- $$ d....38...- $$...


1

9 looks like a severe mistake to me. White may simply capture the single stone and be satisfied, like this: $$B Simple punishment $$ ........- $$ ....Ob..- $$ ....XO..- $$ ..1.XO..- $$ ...XOX2.- $$ ...cOa..- $$ ........- $$ --------- After this, if black c, white may answer at a, or may tenuki. Tenuki is reasonable, because the black followup does not ...


1

The problem with W4 is that it is a "slow," non-forcing move that gives Black many options. Some of those have been covered by other answers, but one good move is P17 (one right of 2) that gives Black the corner, while leaving White very cramped. If you play a sequence that gives your opponent so many good options, the sequence is probably to your opponent'...


1

White 4 gives black another chance to reinforce the corner (at a or b), as it doesn't put much pressure on 3: $$ ---------- $$ ..........| $$ ..........| $$ ..3.2.....| $$ ...4..1...| $$ ..........| $$ ......ab..| For example: $$ ---------- $$ ..........| $$ ..........| $$ 7.3.2.....| $$ ..64..1...| $$ ..........| $$ ......5...|


1

NOTE: I am stupid and misread your diagram as komoko (3-4) instead of hoshi (4-4) in the corner. The following applies to komoku only! I was going to delete this answer, but then decided to leave it up, because the question would probably be interesting for komoku, too. W4 is actually joseki, but it is very, very rarely played. I have never witnessed it in ...


1

If the pros tell you both are joseki... trust them! Your analysis is only based on corner points. To get a better picture, factor in: territory on the sides (depends on the presence of other stones on the board) initiative, for example the ability to interrupt the sequence and play elsewhere aji: whether white can live in the corner is only part of the ...


1

As always it's difficult to give a categorical answer (to say the least), but here are some aspects which I think are relevant. (By the way I am not a strong player so there probably is a better answer) First, contact moves reinforce the adversary and this is exactly what happens in the variation you prefer: white makes good shape with the tiger mouth and ...


1

the high approach is not for territory, but always a special approach due to a particular scenario of the whole board. One purpose of high approach is to attack. Refer to http://eidogo.com/#2LRby3iCq , the 3rd game of the Kamakura jubango between Go Seigen and Minoru Kitani. White 12 is the high approach. The idea is to cut the black 1 (4-4) from black 11. ...


1

You didn't lose the corner, you exchanged it for a position on the right side. That's how pincers work, so nothing wrong here. The high pincer combined with your move at 11 looks right here as it prevents a white moyo. The sequence might not be optimal (see josekipedia/eidogo for the many variations), but the end result looks ok. Capturing at 13 is quite ...


1

Another option for white: $$cm1 $$ +---------------------------------------+ $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . X . O . 2 3 . . | $$ | . . . , . . . . . , . . 1 . 4 X . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . O . a . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . ...


1

Nice one with discussion of the positions is here: http://senseis.xmp.net/?Joseki This page is referred to as a source by Josekipedia.com: http://senseis.xmp.net/?GendaiJosekiJiten But I am not actually sure what that is, if it is equal to http://senseis.xmp.net/?Joseki or not.


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