15

It Has a Child doesn't prevent you from being eliminated. If it did, it would be phrased If you would be eliminated, instead ... instead of If you are eliminated, ... This means that other effects that occur on elimination still occur. Specifically, If you are eliminated by an attack on Tokyo, the Monster who attacked you automatically takes control of ...


12

The skull is actually indicating 0 Life Points (i.e. you are dead and eliminated from the game). This is made more explicit in the Fifth Anniversary Edition rules: In other words, the skull is one lower than 1 Life Point rather than one higher than 12. The fact that the skull and 12 are next to each other is only because this is a round wheel.


12

They cannot heal using the "heart" dice, but they can still heal in other ways. From the rules: Being in Tokyo (Tokyo City or Tokyo Bay) has some advantages and disadvantages: The Monster in Tokyo cannot use the [heart] result on the dice to heal (but can heal using cards)


12

Damage rolled outside of Tokyo is dealt to those in Tokyo. Each [Claw] results in a point of damage dealt to Monsters who are not in the same place as you. If you are in Tokyo (Tokyo City or Tokyo Bay) when you get [Claw], you deal damage to all the Monsters who are not in Tokyo. If you are outside Tokyo when you get [Claw], you deal damage to all the ...


11

Yes. From the rulebook: If the monster in Tokyo Bay is attacked it can choose to abandon Tokyo Bay. In this case the monster that attacked must move in unless it is moving into Tokyo City, in which case Tokyo Bay becomes temporarily unoccupied. If both monsters yield, as this indicates, the attacker would move into Tokyo City and Tokyo Bay would become ...


10

King of New York is essentially King of Tokyo with some modifications: Victory points on the dice are less dominant, having a single VP result. The other 2 faces are replaced with buildings and skulls. There are regions and things to do for people not in the middle. Buildings are able to be destroyed, adding a risk/reward mechanic as destroying buildings ...


10

No. If there are 4 or fewer players currently in the game (i.e. not including players who have been eliminated), then there can only be 1 monster in Tokyo, occupying Tokyo City. The only way for another monster to enter Tokyo is for the monster in Tokyo to leave, and unless someone uses an ability to kick the monster in Tokyo out, then this only happens if ...


9

Rules are here. Purchasing Cards: Turn Overview Rolling and rerolling the dice Resolving the dice Buying cards (optional) End of your turn So you can only buy cards during your turn, and only after rolling and resolving the dice. One exception to this is if you have the Opportunist card, in which case you can buy newly revealed cards ...


9

You only get 9 victory points from that combination if you have the Complete Destruction power card. Complete Destruction 3{Energy} Keep If you roll {1}{2}{3}{Heart}{Claw}{Energy} gain 9{Victory Point} in addition to the regular results.


8

Page 2 of the rules, under the Advanced Rules section, answers this question: If a monster is eliminated and that brings the number of Monsters below 5, Tokyo Bay can't be occupied anymore. The monster in it must leave Tokyo. So your guess was correct. You can only occupy Tokyo City once you drop down to 4 Monsters.


8

At any time, including between other rolls, and these do not count against your normal reroll count.


7

If the card doesn't specify that the damage has to come from you it's not considered an "attack". The rules state If a card deals damage when purchased (like Gas Refinery), this is not considered an attack. Monsters cannot yield Tokyo based on this damage, and cards that affect attacks do not affect these cards. Since the Mecha Blast evolution does ...


7

In general, damage from cards are not considered attacks. For Acid Attack specifically, a search of the net shows the unanimous result that Acid Attack is not considered an attack. Since it's not an attack, you do not have the option of ceding.


7

This is what the rules have to say: If you are attacked while in Tokyo and you don’t want to be there anymore (and who can blame you – it can be rough!) you can yield to the Monster that attacked (he has to take your place). You still take the damage, however. And close by: Warning: A Discard card that deals damage to you is not an ...


7

Yes, Alieniod with Herbivore should gain 1 Star for not damaging anyone. Herbivore specifically tells you to gain a Star if you don't damage anyone, so assuming Alienoid doesn't buy a card that damages anyone, they will gain 1 Star from Herbivore. The rules specifically call out the matter: If an attack somehow ends up doing no damage (due to Camouflage ...


7

There are a few things you could do, but they would have a significant impact on the way the game works. There are 2 ways to win King of Tokyo. Get 20 points, or be the last monster alive. Any suggestion that makes it no longer a game of elimination would remove the second way of winning. The trick is that if losing all your health doesn't eliminate you ...


7

You do not have to hit 20 points exactly, you just need at least 20. While the rulebook doesn't state this explicitly, this is how pretty much every game works unless it specifically states otherwise. Getting 21 points DOES mean that you've gotten 20 points; just like how I literally do have $20 even if I also have more money than that. The heart dial goes ...


6

I assume you are talking about Psychic Probe as the card forcing the reroll. Based on the English translation of the French faq from Boardgame Geek: Psychic probe: If you still have rerolls left, you cannot use them after a psychic probe effect (which takes place the moment you declare that you keep the dice results).


6

When a monster is eliminated while inside Tokyo, they do not yield. Look at the exact phrasing: If you are eliminated by an attack on Tokyo, the Monster who attacked you automatically takes control of Tokyo. The rules say "takes control of", not "is yielded," so no yielding happens and the extra damage from Burrowing doesn't occur. Thematically, this ...


6

There are no rules that say effects that originated from a monster go away once that particular monster has perished, so they persist. Other than being logical it saves on bookkeeping too, otherwise you'd need to track who gave you which counter because powers can be stolen and multiple monsters may have given you a counter from the same power...


6

No, Monsters do not move from Tokyo Bay to Tokyo City. In a 5-player game, there are multiple possible outcomes when you are attacking Tokyo City and Tokyo Bay. If neither Monster dies - The attacker occupies Tokyo City , since you are still playing 5-player. The Monster in Tokyo Bay can choose to yield or not. If the Monster in Tokyo City dies - The ...


6

There isn't really a concept of them belonging to the owner. They go back to the token pool, which is where people take them from as needed. So they can be used again on the same or different players.


5

This boardgamegeek thread has a poster who appealed to iello's site and got this response "The energy cubes that were already on Monster Batteries go back into the bank pile, and the purchaser of Monster Batteries may then use the effect upon purchase." So it seems like whatever cubes are left on there are simply lost to the bank, meaning the longer you ...


5

No, you may only draw one Evolution per set of rolls. The rulebook states: If a monster ends their rolls with at least 3 [hearts], they draw the top Evolution of their deck Firstly, the term "at least 3" indicates that any number above 2 will match the condition, thus 3 or 6 or anything between will give you the same result. Secondly since the card ...


5

Yes. Your doubts probably stem from thinking about the cards that react to attacks. Damage from cards aren't attacks, so those cards don't react to damage from cards. However, Camouflage doesn't mention attacks, only damage. As such, there's no reason for it not to function in the scenario you describe.


5

The probability of getting a Complete Destruction in 1 turn is roughly 20%. So, the expected number of turns is 1/0.2 or 5 turns on average. The 20% number comes from two sources. First, I found a lengthy discussion at board game geek on this topic, which gives the final result of approximately 20%. http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1155539/king-tokyo-odds/...


5

From a game design perspective, adding a house rule that eliminates monster deaths doesn't make much sense. King of Tokyo is centered around two resources: victory points and health. If you take away the death of monsters, you essentially remove health as a resource from the game. This also eliminates many of the game mechanics, such as monster powers ...


5

Is it every turn of the game (my assumption) or every turn of that player? You are right. Notice that Mimic reads At the start of your turn, while Monster Batteries reads At the start of each turn. Interpreting the cards literally also makes the batteries a card that might be worth buying. :) My rationale on this (seeing as it is a "keep" card) is that ...


5

The damage will hit any valid target of a normal dice-based attack, so if you are in Tokyo (City or Bay) all players outside Tokyo are hit, but if you are outside Tokyo the player(s) in Tokyo are damaged. (Taken from the official-ish FAQ from BoardGameGeek) The damage from Acid Attack does not count as an attack, and a monster in Tokyo cannot yield their ...


5

The rules explicitly state that Discard cards are immediately used and discarded. It's in a text box right above "3. Buying cards".


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