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16

You didn't lay out criteria in your question so I'm going to assume that what you're asking is: Let's say Bob diligently acquires as much skill as possible in Monopoly and practices with 50 or more games. If Bob plays several beginners (10 or fewer games - little study of the game), and no players know other players' skill level - is Bob highly likely to win?...


10

Find a new game. Taking of tickets in Ticket to Ride is supposed to be a high risk/high reward action that has the potential to lose you a significant amount of points. Once you try to mitigate an aspect of a game, you're changing how the game plays in ways that weren't intended by the designer. At this point, it's better to find a new game that more ...


8

There are variants of Magic that remove deck shuffling and other sources of non-determinism, but they also make other major modifications that make the game very different from normal Magic. One example is 3-Card Blind, in which any number of players each submit a deck containing 3 cards. Gameplay is as normal, except that attempting to draw from an empty ...


7

The problem with your suggested solution is that it increases the impact of good luck for everyone. The result is that everyone's potential score will be that much higher, so the winner will end up being the person who doesn't get screwed out of routes by other players. As you say, getting lucky with grouped routes does have an impact on the game, and no ...


4

Our house rule is to take all of the tickets that are 17 or higher, shuffle them, and deal one to each player, and deal the other tickets from the (shuffled) rest of the deck. Then shuffle all remaining tickets to form the ticket pile. That way (similar to TTR:Europe) all players have a long route to choose from at the start.


4

A spinner will move along one of two paths every time you spin it (clockwise or anti-clockwise). There is no variation in the spin which could occur with dice, such as bounce, roll, etc. It's always travelling consistently along one path. This means that the distance it travels is always dependent upon how much force was used to spin it. Therefore, if ...


2

We have looked at this game critically and found that we agree with your assessment that there is too much luck. Furthermore, the penalties and rewards for that luck are too extreme the way the rules were written. DISCLAIMER: If you love Monopoly please stop reading this, you will love Boxcars. If you like games of strategy and planning, please continue ...


2

If you want people to have more control over their initial tickets, just give them move to choose from. Instead of 'Draw 4, keep 2-4', you could allow people to 'Draw 6, keep 2-4'. This doesn't impact any part of the game, other than the initial route drafting. There is of course a very simple solution that doesn't involve house rules: ditch your longest ...


2

Skill matters a lot in the game, but with a bit of luck, an player with less skill might beat a player with more skill. The skilled players who know how to take a balance between risk and reward would have a great advantage and would much more likely be able to win the game.


2

From the rules here with emphasis mine A player can use his turn to draw more Destination Ticket cards. To do so, he draws 3 new cards from the top of the Destination Ticket deck. He must keep at least one of the cards, but may also keep two or all three if he chooses. If there are less than 3 Destination Tickets left in the deck, the player only draws what ...


2

I can think of two mathematical measures that might be useful, both based around Elo ratings. Is the correct Elo distribution function. Let's suppose Player B beats Player A 64% of the time, and Player C beats Player B 64% of the time. How often does Player C beat Player A? Generally, speaking, the higher the number, the less of a role luck plays, though ...


1

I think the way to examine the tradeoff between skill Vs luck in a game is by comparing the Expected value Vs Standard Deviation). For example, assume you play Cribbage or Poker a bit better than the other players at the table (meaning that your expected value is larger than zero) . Now, if you play just a single hand, the Variance will be way bigger than ...


1

The accepted answer, while correct, is overly brief. Luck can be reduced in several ways in Stone Age, especially when you think in terms of reducing wasted pips (a pip is 1 dot on a die): When you have no tools, try to concentrate your workers on a single resource each turn. For example, on forest you'll waste 0, 1, or 2 pips on each roll. Your waste per ...


1

As I was playing it many times with two players only, I wanted to remove as much luck as possible. The tools hut may help, but it hardly does in the first few turns, which might be the most important ones. I could eliminate most of randomness using this rule: For resource production use one die only. For each two workers simply count 7 pips without ...


1

Even though I am not 100 percent clear about the game you are proposing (especially what happens when both players choose the same colour) clearly this is no skill game. The optimal strategy is to always take red and beating this strategy can only be done with luck.


1

There is a skill involved in making trades and the rate to build houses and hotels. You can win the game with only the brown properties and hotels on them, that's if your opponents refuse to deal


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