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6

I beg to disagree with User545. Mahjong is drenched in formal--even ceremonial--aspects: The sorting of the seats, the selection of the first east, the building of the wall, the breaking of the same, the collecting of the tiles, the procedures of play, the vocabulary... To a person who grew up with the game around her or him many of these might seem ...


6

Furiten is when you are unable to win on a tile due to certain circumstances. There are about 3 different circumstances. One type of furiten is when you previously discarded a tile that you needed to complete your hand. Let's say if you go for a hand without honors, 1s or 9s(a hand called 'tanyao', worth 1 han), and you have a double wait of 3 or 5 circles ...


5

According to the Japanese Wikipedia article on riichi: 打牌の選択(手牌の入れ替え)ができない。つまり、和了する場合と後述の暗槓する場合を除いて、自摸した牌をそのまま捨てなければならない。 Translating, this means "You are no longer allowed to select your discards (switching the drawn tile with a tile in your hand). In other words, save for drawing your winning tile or calling a concealed kan as described below, you must ...


5

I think most "official" rules will not allow you to do this. (For reference, I looked up the Japanese Mahjong rules from the European Mahjong association here.) In principle, I think swapping tiles that do not change the wait structure would be allowed, but it is impossible to verify. In your example of swapping the 5 for the 8, all that is visible is the ...


4

According to WWWJDIC, the word is イーチャン, or 一荘 in kanji - read as iichan (although it's unusualy in that it appears to be written in katakana, which I'm guessing could mean that it's a fairly new loanword from Chinese?). There's a JMdictDB entry on it here.


4

The official mahjong rules do not allow for "cross" bets by players on each other, or by outside parties on or against players. Now this lady may have been playing by "house" rules in "her" games. But those rules do not apply to your table unless you all agree to them.


4

The simplest answer is that the "Dragon" tiles are more of a triplet, and not a pair. This is pretty clear when using one of their Chinese names 三元牌 or Three Fundamental Tiles, the name "Dragons" was added by Joseph Babcock when introducing the game to America (he also mistakenly named the 索子 suit bamboo). When translating the game Babcock should probably ...


3

I do not know the answer, but I asked in a experienced Mahjong group I'm in, kindly received a most valuable pointer and was subsequently able to extend it to this answer: Was it just a culturally interpretive term invented by English-speaking players? Probably. An online search brough up http://i.imgur.com/crKOGnw.png (A Mah Jong Handbook: How to Play, ...


3

These rules have 2 and 3 person variant rules. So yes you can play with 2 or 3 people as well. Here's the relevant rule changes: Two-Player Mah Jong This is good practice for beginners although not quite such a good game as the more typical version with 4 players. One player plays East, the other West. The preliminaries are conducted in the same ...


3

If you're eyeballing it, then you go with counting three things: the standard count from 8. (worst case scenario: 147m147p147s1234z or 13-sided kokushi) the terminal count from 13. (worst case scenario: all simples is 13-shanten) the seven pairs count from 6. (worst case scenario: anything without a pair) Standard count from 8 is to identify up to 5 ...


3

Well, the good news is that you are not in Furiten. The waits on that hand are 2-char, 5-char, and 8-char, and none of those have been discarded by either player, so Furiten does not apply. What you DID fall victim to is the yaku requirement. That hand does not meet the requirements on account of it being open. It would need to be a concealed hand for a win ...


3

I wrote a program that draws a random 14-tile set from a reservoir of all possibles tiles (expect flowers and seasons, sorry): then the program checks if the hand is a mahjong. So far here are my results: This means that for 71 millions random hands, I got 151 mahjong hands. We can say it has converged (almost). Conclusion: You will get a "tinwu", "tenhou"...


3

I'm generally a fan of Riichi Mahjong, but what I use for teaching beginners is Zung Jung, a very simple and logical ruleset. See the scoring chart here - it's easy to apply (no "small points" and "multipliers", only one limit), and the point values are adequate to the effort required for a given pattern. At the same time, you can find most of the commonly ...


2

What I call a dead hand is one where there is no possibility of winning. The case I’m thinking of is a hand that was complete except it was missing one pair. All four of the needed tiles were out. Because it was for a pair and I didn’t have even one of the two, my hand was “dead”. If I had one, I could claim a discarded one even though it was for a pair ...


2

My preferred ruleset is Mahjong Competition Rules, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guobiao_Majiang (I don't think anyone in the west call them by the name Guobiao though, or at least I have yet to hear anyone do so, even at major tournaments). The rules can also be found at http://mahjong-europe.org/. These may seem very complicated at first, but the scoring ...


2

Riichi Mahjong has a one-yaku minimum before you can complete your hand. While tsumo gives you a yaku if the hand is still closed, it won't give you anything if you've already opened your hand by calling melds. For further details, you can read the related answer here: Why couldn't this hand win with ron? Your hand, as it stands, doesn't have any yaku. ...


2

It doesn't look like you're in furiten. However, in riichi mahjong, a hand also needs at least one complete yaku (multiplier) before it can be completed, and I'm not seeing one in your hand. If your hand were still closed, you could easily supply the needed multiplier simply by calling riichi. However, calling riichi requires a closed hand, and since you'...


2

I know some sets use a blank tile for a white dragon. The red one could be a red dragon. This page has a blank white dragon. And according to this page (link provided by L. Scott Johnson): There are blank tiles in other sets too, including Chinese Bakelite and Bakelite sets. These tiles were always a bit of insurance that a lost tile would not make the ...


2

Generally yes, but it will depend on which variant you are playing and any special rules. It sounds like you are playing Japanese Mahjong (since you use the term "ron"), in which case you will need to be sure your hand has at least one yaku if you use someone else's tile to win, and obviously you can't be in a "no ten" state. Precedence rules may also apply ...


2

The Rules of Mah Jong by The World Series of Mah Jong state: Change of Claim: If a player, after announcing a claim for “chi”, “pong” or “kong”, changes his mind and wishes to change his claim into one of another type (or to “win”), this is usually allowed without penalty. (Unless the player has already exposed his set, in which case any illegally exposed ...


1

From Tom Sloper's rules, there are no loose tiles: After breaking the wall, each player takes 2 stacks (4 tiles) at a time until everyone has 12 tiles, then: East takes one tile from the first and third stacks, and the following three players take one tile each in order. This leaves East with 14 tiles and they discard to start the game. Here's another set ...


1

We have a mahjong set and regularly play with only three people but using the same rules as the four-player game. The only difference is that it is often slightly easier for someone to win with three players. That said, we still goulash every so often. The two player game is also possible using different rules, usually with making all pairs in a hand, ...


1

I commonly flip over the next tile. (following the procedure in HK-style where if a player draws a flower, it is revealed and a replacement tile drawn)


1

If you're taking over a minute to count shanten you're thinking too hard. Shanten counting can be done in seconds using your head. Look at your hand. For every pair or incomplete sequence, count 1. For completed melds, count 2. Subtract the total from 8. Do not count tiles with overlap! Example: 1225dots 56bamboos 23588characters red east 12dots = 1 ...


1

I'll be assuming you're playing Riichi, that's the only ruleset I know which has "dead hands". If I understand your question correctly, I don't see why she would declare your hand dead at all in this situation. I take it you declared Riichi in that game. If she called you dead because you could not win, since she kept your winning tiles, that is not a ...


1

As the question refers to game flow, the short answer is yes. {OP MainQ} The long answer is that calling a kan (closed or not) does three things: First, It will break time-sensitive bonuses: any calls to meldwarning tiles into a group is registered as incrementing the turn count. It is properly understood that when open calls occur, this is the case. ...


1

Warning: not exactly familiar with the term Riichi, nor with the specific Mahjong ruleset Riichi Mahjong (Henceforth, RMJ). In the books I've read, and the 3 different published rulesets I've played (One of which was a 1960's Japanese rulebook translation), the functional definition of "on the first turn" is "without having discarded." Having just read ...


1

Here is yet another answer from this page. 以上により、天和の確率は12859078207674÷4250305029168216000 =約0.000003025 (約1/330530)となります。 I think it means that the probability to get a tenhou=tenwu is 1/330530. Unfortunately i don't follow precisely the derivation because it is written in Japanese. So far the answers are: 1/350000 according to @mafu's program ==> Is the ...


1

Note: I am basing this answer on Japanese Mahjong rules; Chinese rules will probably lead to a different outcome. Tenhou, Chihou or Renhou hands must be valid hands, i.e. they must satisfy the requirement of having four groups of three and one pair; except for Chiitoi (seven pairs) and Kokushi Musou (13 orphans) which we must treat separately. The four ...


1

The https://tenhou.net/sc/prof.html page contains statistics on yaku. As I understand it, Tenhou (天和) is found in 0.00046% of the hands that ended in someone victory, and Chiihou (地和) in 0.00091%. Thus, one case is obtained for approximately 100,000 or less.


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