22

These are replacement effects, and you can't apply any single replacement effect to any single event more than once. So, once you apply both effects, you stop, the damage is dealt, and the game continues. These are the relevant rules about Replacement Effects: 614.1. Some continuous effects are replacement effects. Like prevention effects (see rule 615), ...


15

Not sure how applicable it is, since it never had an actual physical card-based implementation (and ergo isn't strictly on-topic for this site), but Alteil was an online game based on CCG deck-building mechanics. While the original Japanese game still appears to be in active development, this answer is based on the English localization of it that has been ...


13

There are several ways to implement timers in board games Tokens. Games like Paper Tales or Pixel Tactics (starting from 2nd set) use addition/removal of tokens from game components to track passage of time. Like this: this option works well for cards (or other components you can easily store tokens upon) with relatively small number of simultaneous ...


10

I feel that most board games favour clearer rulebooks over short sentences, so they'll often tell you the number to deal based on the number of players. If you prefer a shorter sentence: Shuffle and deal out all the cards evenly amongst the players. Set aside any leftover cards - all players should have the same amount. If you wanted to go with ...


10

Replace 2 & 3 with: "Deal out the entire deck, giving an equal number of cards to each player and setting aside any remaining cards"


9

Zatch Bell The Card Battle TCG (http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/18287/zatch-bell) is a TCG with no shuffling. It also features deck as health and deck as resource.


9

It is to promote communication between players. If you and I (try to) use the same lift/elevator in the same turn, one of us will be delayed - and this send all of that player's subsequent plans back a turn! Likewise for shooting guns, firing missiles, certain energy transfer actions... you can get really messed up if two players "do" the same thing in a ...


9

While your example is not a loop, as @murgatroid99 described, the answer to your question for actual loops is still No. Any time there is a loop that involves optional actions (...you may have that damage...), the active player must choose a finite number of iterations in which to perform the loop, then perform an action that would not continue it (were your ...


9

Not sure if this is the right way to offer a suggestion I have thought of myself for feedback, but... A time bar Labelled 0-5 or so, various items are put on the time bar, and everything is brought one step down at the beginning of my turn. Normally, most of my action points are just set at "1" when used, to be regained next turn. However... In ...


8

Mage Wars is a living card game and not a CCS, but that is an irrelevant point once gameplay begins. Unlike a CCG, a living card game sells packs open so you always know what you are going to get. I think the most popular idea of this is actually Warhammer 40k where players buy the exact units that they want for their armies. In Mage Wars, players build ...


8

I'll illustrate with a five-player example. It is player A's turn. Based on my reading, I am assuming the following things. Are these assumptions correct? Players B, C, D and E each play a card face down and give it to player A. All cards are played simultaneously. Player A does not know which player played which card. Some cards may cause player A to ...


8

For starters, you cannot objectively have the scoring based on precision, cleanliness, etc. Players will vote however they want, which - depending on the system you use to collect votes - can allow for votes in bad faith, votes in error, and random votes. To compound the situation, more players voting on a single set of submissions will result in fewer and ...


8

Instead of modeling you can compute these results exactly. If you roll n dice at difficulty d, the variance will be [d * n * (d-1)/6 * (7-d)/6], and the mean net gain will be [d * n * (7-d)/6 - 1]. Both scale linearly with n, so here are the mean (measured in Net Gain Per Die) and variance for each value of d: ----------------------- | d | Mean | Variance | ...


8

I would recommend building your own timer out of something like card stock with spinning wheel, something similar to the design below (pardon the MSPaint): The Bottom layer: The base of the Timer, it holds everything else. The Middle Layer: It has four support posts in the corners and a central wheel that can spin freely. The wheel has been subdivided into ...


7

Under normal circumstances, you cannot forget to untap lands because it's not an optional action. As for rules enforcement in your own group: that's entirely your group's call. Untapping lands is not optional. It's a turn-based action that happpens automatically. If you forget to do that, your group may handle that situation any way you decide to. The ...


6

It is 10 just like in a normal game. The only format that changes the number of poison counters needed to cause a player to lose a game is Two-Headed Giant. 704.5c If a player has ten or more poison counters, he or she loses the game. Ignore this rule in Two-Headed Giant games; see rule 704.5u instead. 704.5u In a Two-Headed Giant game, if a team has ...


5

Formula D is a racing game where you select your die (non-standard D4, D6, D8, D12, D20, D30) based on your "gear". So if you are in first gear, you roll the D4 and you can roll between 1-4. If you are in 6th gear, you roll a D30 with numbers 20-30 printed on it. You move forward the number of spaces specified on the die. It also has a D20 Danger Die ...


5

The best way is obviously subjective so I'll throw out some ideas for Severance. Here's two quick ideas to make Severance possibly work during the initial reveal: A): When you reveal your card, orientation matters. Straight-up means play as normal, sideways means severance. This is a simple way to do it but opens up the door to misplays of "Oh, meant to ...


5

The great granddaddy of deck-building actually does have a negative feedback loop in it: In Dominion, victory points come in the form of green cards which you add to your deck[1]. In every game of Dominion you will have access to three basic Victory cards - Estate, Duchy and Province - and there are others that get added as part of choosing the kingdom for ...


5

The social contract does most of the heavy lifting The social contract is an unspoken agreement between all the players of the game as to how the game should be played to maximize the enjoyment of all the players. (Sometimes it's a spoken agreement, especially in tabletop roleplaying games. Regardless, it's always present.) The goal of a game isn't to ...


5

It is likely that making this kind of prediction to any useful degree of accuracy is beyond the current state of the art in computing. First, consider that forecasting the future metagame that uses unreleased cards is essentially equivalent to "forecasting" the current metagame using the current card pool. This actually helps, because that means that you ...


4

It all depends on what you want your players to do. Diminishing returns tells your players that you want to be the first to do this, and you don't want to do a lot of it. As soon as I have H2O in hand, I want to make water before anyone else does. Once it's been done, I don't want to do that unless I have to because other plays are more valuable. ...


4

The decision is obviously localized to the game and requires a significant amount of background to answer objectively. The important distinction between the two is this: diminishing returns is easy, but amplifying returns is hard. When you have diminishing returns, you introduce two elements. The first is resourcefulness (no pun intended). If you can ...


4

I might recommend Carcassonne - it has a slightly different take on builder placement, while relying primarily on tile placement. The game board itself will be different every time, as you're drawing and placing random tiles every turn. Play itself goes quickly after your first playthrough, and there are several different strategies toward victory. With ...


4

I am unable to find any game with that precise mechanic, but there are many related: Snowblind: Race for the Pole uses different sided dice to provide different probabilities. Every action you perform in a round requires you to take a die, and after every action you must roll all dice in your possession, with low numbers causing bad things to happen to you. ...


4

Make sure that single actions can have multiple different outcomes depending on how and when they are used Strategic complexity is created when a player has multiple mutually exclusive actions* they can take which could all theoretically lead to victory, and the player has to figure out which one is the best. The more plausible options they have, the more ...


4

Nertz requires a different color back (or back design) for each player to determine the score at the end of the game, so two-player Nertz would match your description. Each player (team) scores one point for each of their own cards that they managed to play into the common area. To determine this, the foundation piles have to be sorted out according to ...


4

There is really not much that you can do in rules to totally eliminate this problem, but you can try to reduce it. One possibility is to implement catch-up mechanisms so that it is rather unlikely that a player falls so far behind that (s)he has no chance of winning any more before the game is close to the end. Another one is to have all or at least part of ...


3

You really do need to read the rules, more thoroughly than it sounds as if the rest of the group has done. If you do, you will find that RoR is not a common-or-garden multiplayer game where an ally is somebody you have no reason to attack at present; it is designed so that the players all have to genuinely co-operate to keep the state going, and the winner ...


3

With 2-3 sets, you could play Button Men, a Cheapass Game about capturing dice. Lots of entirely free characters available.


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