57

Use this bias in your favor! Some players just won't listen to the most reasonable arguments. Trying to convince them that you were attacked enough won't work, instead use their biases in our own favor. Don't lead on the start of the game, try to be the second strongest player, then stay quiet while others attack the leader. It is nice to see everybody ...


23

My experience is mostly from Magic: the Gathering, so may not be applicable here but I have found a couple of effective tactics. Make Attacking You Painful Since the first person to be attacked frequently becomes a target for others, you must avoid being that player. To achieve this, the best way in my experience is to make attacking you involve a ...


11

Appear less threatening than you really are. Depending on the game, you have a variety of options available to you: Sandbag or stall your plan like Cohensius describes so that you are not the first target. Amass resources instead of spending them on flashy plays. For example, in Lords of Waterdeep, this could mean saving your resources for future plans ...


5

There are many ways to mitigate this, although which one(s) work will depend on the game and the playgroup: Don't take an early lead. In a game where players have an easy way to penalize/attack one player, hanging out in second and pointing out how dangerous the person in first is can be a great way to sneak into the victory if everyone dogpiles the person ...


4

You could embrace your notoriety and play with "everyone vs you"-rules. For example, Magic: The Gathering has an "Archenemy" game mode, where one player is the "Archenemy" and everyone else gangs up on them. It might not make you win more, but you won't feel cheated, and victory will be all the more sweet. You could also take turns being the "Archenemy" so ...


4

I think the important thing to distinguish is why the other players are attacking you for. Are they attacking you because: it is funny to them? (them attacking you has little to no benefit to them in game, and they enjoy seeing you suffer more then they enjoy winning the game) you are too good at other games compared to them and they think you will win ...


3

You do not need to give your deck a name. A name for a deck is just an easy way to describe the same set of ~60 cards (accounting for the fact that you won't need a different name for a deck that only changes two cards). A deckname is just used to communicate about that specific deck easier. If you want to name your monored Goblin-deck "Green Guys" (since ...


1

I propose a system where each game night has 20 points to allocate. You divide the points between the number of times you play that game. (e.g. You play a game 2 times, 10 points for each game). The allocation of the points is: ~25% to winner, ~15% to second place, ~20% each to three achievements. The set amount of points fits #1. The scores for wins/...


1

Make yourself beneficial to them As with some of the other answers, this one is coming from experience with the card game Magic: The Gathering. I have a reputation among my friends of being tactical and pulling out surprise combos and come-from-behind victories. This causes me to be a frequent target if the deck I'm using can't readily fend them off. One ...


1

I rather think that people name their deck to express what's inside, to easily tell the other what you are going to play. Typically (at least with the people I play) we use the color code (see this question) added with the typical category of the deck (aggro, control, mid-range, combo... you can find an exhaustive list on various websites). This is the ...


1

If you are interested in redesigning a classroom experience into a game format, I would recommend the author The Multiplayer Classroom by Lee Sheldon. In addition to discussing his own experiences as a college professor trying to teach game design by turning his course into a game – and incorporating game lingo such as mobs for quizzes, raids for ...


1

I think you could provide a set structure for the game mechanism while keeping the actual content of the game to be defined by teacher and students. This allows less skilled people to join in while these boundaries (you may call them guiding principles) to provide guidance and inspiration. Example: think of a customised happy families (kwartet in Dutch) as ...


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