94

Being in jail only prevents you from moving, and does not prevent you from doing any other action, including collecting rent. The rules state: Even though you are in Jail, you may buy and sell property, buy and sell houses and hotels and collect rents. This is a very popular strategy late in the game, as the less you move, the less likely you are to ...


92

Yes, you still collect $200. From the rulebook: Each time a player’s token lands on or passes over GO, whether by throwing the dice or drawing a card, the Banker pays him/her a $200 salary. No mention of the player "asking" for the money or anything. It says the Banker pays him, so the Banker pays him.


78

You go to jail directly on rolling the third double, so there’s no opportunity to land on “go to jail”.


77

Yes, they would still gain $200 from passing GO then landing on a square that makes them draw a card like this. You collect $200 immediately when you land on or pass GO, then the player would continue their move and land on Chance/Community Chest, then draw that card. The text on the card specifies that you cannot collect $200 if you pass GO (again) in ...


58

First of all make sure you are following the base rules for Monopoly as there are a lot of different house rules that are used that make the game take much longer then it should. Judging on the accepted answer it seems that you are indeed using some house rules that make the game take longer. I am including 3 rules that are commonly changed by house rules ...


53

Look closely at the card and it tells you exactly what to do. Advance token to nearest railroad Pay owner twice the rental to which he/she is entitled. If railroad is unowned, you may buy it from the bank. Advance means you are moving forward on the board so this will always move you to the railroad that you run into. In your example it means that ...


50

Not being able to collect rent is just one of many fairly common house rules. Some house rules disqualify an owner from collecting rent while in jail. This allows reprieve for other players landing on an expensive property with houses or a hotel during the time a player is incarcerated. While this is not an official rule, some people choose to play by ...


46

You're thinking about this too much in terms of real-life prison sentences, and too little as game mechanics. "Jail" is simply a location on the board, associated with a few specific rules, but none of those rules suggest that there would be "Jail Time" stacking up. Instead, you are either in Jail, or not. Furthermore, upon rolling doubles a third time, you ...


45

Original answer You collect $200 each time you pass over or land on the GO. See the official rules. Each time a player's token lands on or passes over GO, whether by throwing the dice or drawing a card, the Banker pays that player a $200 salary. "The $200 is paid only once each time around the board. However, if a player passing GO on the throw of the ...


34

"Anyone can bid in an auction, including the one who declined the option to buy it at the printed price." Also, more official rules PDF. From other forums I have visited, it seems as though most people do not play by the rules, the entire rules, and nothing but the rules...


30

It appears you have the Championship Edition (or the Mega Edition or some other recent modified version), which includes a "speed die" (that third die) for speeding up the game, though it's definitely not part of the original game. There are two "bus" faces, and one "Mr. Monopoly" face. I found these rules on Hasbro's site explaining how it works. The PDF ...


30

Keeping 4 houses on your property(ies) is a very simple strategy that reduces the length of the game quite dramatically. Tying up 8 or 12 houses prevents other players from buying those houses, keeping rents on their properties low, while increasing rents on your own. On many properties, the difference in rent between 4 houses and a hotel is relatively small ...


28

When I've played Monopoly, the owner of property always kept the property card ("title deed") on the table in front of them, visible to all players. The bank should also keep the unsold property cards visible to everyone; that way, you won't need to call attention to yourself if you land on an owned property. That is, you shouldn't keep track of who owns ...


25

The utilities are decent "fire and forget" properties, which pay for themselves quickly. Think of them as equivalent to owning two railroads, but paying a bit better because you can't improve them further. They don't have the same explosive-growth potential of railroads or properties, but they're cheaper. You're not going to bankrupt anyone with them, but ...


25

Sounds like a house rule to me. http://richard_wilding.tripod.com/monorules.htm claims to be a copy of the rules from the official rulebook. The section on Buying Property reads only: Whenever you land on an unowned property you may buy that property from the Bank at its printed price. You receive the Title Deed card showing ownership. Place the ...


23

Yes. From the official rules, "whenever you land on an unowned property you may buy that property from the Bank at its printed price."


22

The player who cannot pay has just properly incurred, according to the Rules, a debt to the Bank that cannot be paid. That is the definition of Bankrupt. If the player is unable to relieve the bankruptcy, then all their assets go to the Bank, which then auctions off all properties to the remaining players, as per the Official Rules for Bankruptcy. The ...


21

Yes, you have to pay. Consider what the card says: Advance token to nearest Utility. If unowned, you may buy it from the Bank. If owned, throw dice and pay owner a total ten times the amount thrown. This has nothing to do with paying rent. As you mentioned, there is another Chance card that sends you to a railroad: Advance token to the nearest ...


21

Yes, the player collects $200. To understand this, let's step through each action the player takes. First, the player passes GO during normal movement of his/her token. The GO square reads: Collect $200.00 salary as you pass GO Read plainly, this means the player collects the $200 the moment the player's token reaches GO while moving around the board. ...


19

No, you only collect $200 dollars, not $400. From the official rules: Each time a player's token lands on or passes over GO, whether by throwing the dice or drawing a card, the Banker pays that player a $200 salary. The $200 is paid only once each time around the board. You only land on GO once, so you only get one payout. The message on the card is ...


19

What is the M-symbol? It is most likely just an imaginary symbol for Monopoly money. For "everyday use", the closest symbol might be "₩" or "₩", just turned upside down. This is a symbol for Won, currency used in South and North Korea. How to use it?: LaTeX Since the Monopoly M is not a real symbol, it does not have an alt-code. It can be still used via ...


19

Community Chest is named from the original Atlantic City version of Monopoly. In Atlantic City, the Community Chest was a welfare organisation. Therefore, Community Chest cards are more likely than not to give money. On the other hand, Chance cards are more likely to move you to a random 'chance' location.


18

The usual ruling is that if you are threatened with bankruptcy (you've landed on a property and don't have enough cash), you can only make trades with other players if they will allow you to avoid bankruptcy. If you can't avoid it, the bankrupting player gets everything you owned (cash and property) at the instant you landed on them, after selling houses/...


18

Yes, you can only downgrade a hotel to a number of houses if that number of houses is actually available in the bank. If there are no houses, you must sell the entire hotel outright. This fact can be used strategically: If there is a shortage of houses, players should consider buying the last houses rather than buying hotels because each hotel built ...


18

From the Official Rules of Monopoly (my emphasis): The bank has a fixed supply of 32 houses and 12 hotels. If more players decide to build more houses at the same time than there are houses in the bank, the houses are auctioned off one at a time to the highest bidder. This rule favors the owners of expensive properties, for which the houses cost more in ...


18

The rules state: If you throw doubles three times in succession, move your token immediately to the space marked "In Jail". So when you roll the third doubles, you go straight to Jail and never visit the space you would otherwise land on, so you don't get to purchase it.


18

The property can be bought (or auctioned) if it's unowned, and rent is owed to its owner otherwise. The card in your example doesn't exist as a Community Chest card. There is such a Chance card. It's exact text is Advance token to the nearest Railroad and pay owner twice the rental to which he/she is otherwise entitled. If Railroad is unowned, you ...


17

The official rules are here. I can see nothing in the rules that would explicitly prevent one player offering immunity to another player. You only have to pay rent if the owner of the property asks you for it: The owner may not collect the rent if he/she fails to ask for it before the second player following throws the dice. However, you could argue that ...


17

As per the official rules, "[y]our turn ends when you are sent to jail". So in that situation, having landed on the "Go To Jail" space, the player gets put in jail and his turn ends so he has no opportunity to roll the third time.


17

The wording is ambiguous, but in the many years that I've played this game, I have never heard it interpreted as "Find the closest railroad in front of or behind you, and advance until you arrive there". While I know of no official ruling that spells this out (which is, in itself, somewhat telling, since most people seem to assume that "nearest" only ...


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