36

That is a house rule as there is nothing in the base rules about communicating with other players and there is also no such thing as paying free parking. Honestly it is a rule that hurts less experienced or younger players as it discourages others from helping them play when other players may try and take advantage of their inexperience/age. While the rules ...


26

That's not how a mortgage works in Monopoly or real life! A bank does not give you a perpetual income and ask you pay that amount plus 10% back once. A Mortgage is a one-time loan based on the property value. It is not a perpetual income. The rules you need are all here. There is no reference anywhere that you get a mortgage value every turn. ...


16

This rule is a house rule, because any rule that involves putting any amount of money under Free Parking is a house rule. As @Joe W quoted: "FREE PARKING": A player landing on this place does not receive any money, property or reward of any kind. This is just a "free" resting place. -The Rules of Monopoly (1935), p. 6 It is understandable that you ...


16

From the rules: SELLING PROPERTY...Unimproved properties, railroads and utilities (but not buildings) may be sold to any player as a private transaction for any amount the owner can get; however, no property can be sold to another player if buildings are standing on any properties of that color-group. Any buildings so located must be sold back to the Bank ...


9

A fat chance/A slim chance, whatever you wish to call it. Even if you could get the last railroad AND the last utility AND get all hotels on your set for $0, you will still lose, unless a miracle happens, i.e. you never land on his hotels or on the set until his hotels are down. There is a 7.54% chance (2 decimal places) you will land on his hotels (and ...


9

If I understand it correctly, you're looking to generate a uniformly distributed random integer in the range 1-16 using only regular d6s. You'll need two distinguishable dice; if you don't have distinguishable dice, then roll one die, note the result and then one die again. Call the dice "die A" and "die B". Map the result of die A as ...


9

Strictly by the rules, no. Auctions only occur if a player lands on an un-owned property and chooses to not buy it for its listed price. However, as you say, unimproved properties can be sold to any other player for any agreed price. The rules don't say how you come to agree on which player, or what price, so you could always ask the other players what they'...


8

Nothing happens (or if you want to say he owes himself money you can). Monopoly spells out what happens in the rules fairly well. The Chance and Community Chest cards also do a good job of explaining what should happen. Nothing in that Chance card says anything about the Bank paying in the event the property is owned by the player. It simply says If ...


8

Just the last throw, as shown on the deed card: If one "Utility" is owned rent is 4 times amount shown on dice. If both "Utilities" are owned rent is 10 times amount shown on dice. "amount shown on dice", not "amount of all rolls this turn." This is further reinforced on the Wiki: If ONE Utility is owned, rent is 4x the number on the dice which ...


8

The short answer is "Yes, but...". The longer answer is, as per the paper in question, that a team of researchers did some calculations on what would happen in a 2-player game of Monopoly where both players follow very simple strategies (and a couple of things that aren't 100% by the rules), notably: Always try to keep a small reserve of cash on hand to ...


8

No you are unable to build houses on any property in a color group where any property is mortgaged. While it does not mention it in the rules about houses it does mention that all hotels and houses must be sold prior to mortgaging any property of that color group. The rules also follow up with an explicit statement that you may begin to buy houses back once ...


7

Philip Orbanes is the renowned master of all things Monopoly. He is the author of 3 books on Monopoly : The Monopoly Companion: The Players' Guide The World’s Most Famous Game--and How It Got That Way Monopoly, Money and You: How to Profit from the Game's Secrets of Success. Kevin Tostado is Director of the movie Under the Boardwalk: The MONOPOLY Story, a ...


7

There are indeed no instructions in the official rules on how to resolve multiple payments. A common mechanism in game design to handle such cases is to pay your debts in turn order. You go bankrupt to the player who you cannot pay. Example: turn order is Alice, Bob, Charlie, Daniel and Eve. It's Alice's turn and she is instructed to pay $50 to each player....


7

Yes, you must give them the correct change. This is not an issue of a specific rule, but rather just one of how "paying things" in general works, both in games and real life. If you owe someone $16, a valid way to pay that $16 is to give them $100 and ask for $84 back. If the person doesn't have $84 to give you in change; then the two of you work out how to ...


7

The use of passive language here is quite annoying, and the official Monopoly rules from the Hasbro website don't actually provide enough detail to give a definitive answer. There are plenty of websites that argue in favour of the interpretation that it's based on how many Railroads are owned by the player collecting rent, but for a definitive answer? We ...


5

Building shortages are part of the strategy of the game and it is intended that players might not be able to buy houses because of a lack of them in the bank. It is also intended that when a player has to sell a hotel they also have to sell all all houses as well if there are not enough in the bank. BUILDING SHORTAGES When the Bank has no houses to sell,...


4

You can offer any trades to any players; and there’s no specific rules about the format that these offers take. So you can make offers in such a way that it’s basically an auction. If someone says they are willing to pay $100 for your property, then you can always ask if anyone else is willing to pay more. So yes, you could auction your properties in this ...


4

The player is bankrupt and out of the game and you get the mortgaged property with some conditions. You will have to pay the bank 10% of the mortgaged value when you get it and before you unmortgage it if it is not on the same turn. Rules If you have mortgaged property you also turn this property over to your creditor but the new owner must at once ...


4

The following ruling was received from Hasbro, publisher of Monopoly and organiser of International Monopoly Tournaments. I have therefore completely rewritten this answer. My questions to Hasbro : The rules of Monopoly state that when a players goes bankrupt to the bank, the player turns all assets over to the Bank. The Bank then auctions off these ...


4

You played within the rules. Houses must be built up (and sold off) evenly within a color group, but different color groups can be built up differently without regard to each other. The section of the rules you quote is exactly the section that supports your play. Addendum: not an official source, but this same question came up on boardgamegeek (with the ...


4

If Player 1 does not want to lose the game, one thing (and the only thing) he can do is to mortgage the (only) property that he owned. So although he will still lose $15 from this deal, at least he would not go bankrupt when Player 2 lands on his property. Doing this move is a gamble as Player 2 might not land on his property at all (For obvious reasons, ...


4

According to Hasbro, publishers of Monopoly, you move forward to the next railroad. Here is the answer I received from Hasbro's Global Customer Care Representative :


4

Since the "no trading/selling" rule is your own house rule, you're going to have to determine this yourself. My own opinion is that you should probably allow the auctioning off of mortgaged property. Why? Because the only thing the standard rules say you can't sell is improved properties (property with houses/hotels). It explicitly allows the ...


4

The vast majority of countries in the world are either signatories to the Berne Convention or the TRIPS Agreement, both of which ensure that copyright is protected in those jurisdictions. As such, what you're suggesting is a copyright violation and could definitely lead to legal difficulties for you. Will the US Company sue me for distributing the game in ...


4

If you aren't opposed to buying different dice, you can obtain the result directly from two consecutive d4 rolls. The first roll tells you whether you are looking at the first, second, third or fourth quarter of the list. The second roll tells you whether you want the first ... or fourth item in that quarter. No dice need to be refilled (no empty results) ...


4

There are several different levels on which this question can be answered. First, there is no mechanism given in the rules for holding such an auction. So it is not possible to hold such an auction in the game. But just because you can't perform an activity as a game action doesn't mean that you can't do it. There's nothing in the rules allowing you make a ...


3

No you absolutely should not have had to sell the house back in order to pay the extra 100 back to the other player. At worst you should have have undone the transaction so that you had enough money to return the extra 100. I say this because having to sell the houses punishes you as you would end up with less money and 2 fewer houses purchased with the sell ...


3

Frame challenge: I don't believe it's plausible for this to happen in any game with sane players, and so there is no need for the rules to cover it. Any property, once bought, can be instantly mortgaged for half its face value. It is therefore in every player's interest to buy a property in an auction for half its face value or lower. If a player has no ...


3

It is not in the rules. But on this page: Utilities are the only properties without fixed rents, as rent depends on the dice roll which landed the token on the property. They only mention the dice roll, that landed the token on the property. So the rolls are not added.


3

It's concept art From an ebay description: an Original Monopoly Neiman Marcus Concept / Prototype Artwork from 1976. This was purchased from a Neiman Marcus marketing executives estate sale, whom worked at the company in the late 60’s & 1970’s.


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